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minnbuckeye

compressor

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minnbuckeye

I know little about compressors and I am thinking of putting a compressor in an unheated garage. Is that an issue? Winter temps in there could be minus 25-30 F. Also, is distance from the compressor to the work area a problem?

 

Mike

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Kane

Starting any motor up in the cold can be an issue. Maybe get a portable heater in there running for a bit before firing up the compressor?

 

Distance shouldn’t be an issue if your lines have no air leaks. You should still get ample pressure with a longer hose. :)

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RJB

What Kane said.  I too live where it gets a bit cold.  When I get up in the morning I go out to the garage and turn on my little heaters, ( I have two), then go back inside and have my coffee and do my computer stuff.   I do have an insulated garage though.   if you run that hot air coming from the compressor into those cold hoses/pipes you can get some serious condensation.  Good luck

 

RB

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minnbuckeye
2 hours ago, RJB said:

if you run that hot air coming from the compressor into those cold hoses/pipes you can get some serious condensation.  Good luck

 

@RJB, That was my concern. I do have a heater that can be used to warm things up a bit when I think about using it. Would a water trap between it and the hand equipment be enough to prevent problems if I spot heat? I assume it needs to be located indoors. The garage is insulated, just not heated. I try to keep it under 32 or the snow melts off the vehicles and creates a mess.

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Bob Saunders

when you say minus 35 below zero I shudder. You did not say type, oil will be very thick. so it may not start and motor will kick out. Small oil-less may work. 110 or large 220 volt  and do you have the outlet? A water trap would be a must either way. A basement would be better. also drain the tank monthly. distance may not be an issue unless water freezes in the line, like a low spot. 

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Malcolmt

Mine is out in an unheated Canadian winter garage... No issues at all have 50 foot air hose running back into prep area

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minnbuckeye

Thanks to all for the education!!!

 

Mike

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Ptychodus04

I would put a water trap on the line before it leaves the garage and another on the line immediately ahead of your tool manifold. This will capture moisture before it gets to your exposed air line to the work area and will help prevent condensation build up in the line which could lead to a frozen line during your mild Minnesota winter. :P

 

I don't miss Minnesota winters at all.

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RJB

   Ive got a 50 foot piece of hose from the compressor all coiled up and hanging from the ceiling to collect condensation and then a water trap after that.  You cant see the water trap cause its behind stuff.  But on certain days I still get some moisture coming out of my airscribe. 

 

RB

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Malcolmt

In winter the temp in my garage is well below the dew point so very little if any  moisture is actually in my winter lines. It is the humid summers up here in Canada that are the issue. I am draining the tank every 2nd day in the summer and I have multiple water traps and a large Pipe desiccator in my setup,

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Ptychodus04
57 minutes ago, Malcolmt said:

In winter the temp in my garage is well below the dew point so very little if any  moisture is actually in my winter lines. It is the humid summers up here in Canada that are the issue. I am draining the tank every 2nd day in the summer and I have multiple water traps and a large Pipe desiccator in my setup,

Makes sense. You can't have sub-freezing air temps with a high level of dissolved liquids in it at the same time. I almost never have dry ambient air and have to trap water 365. I'm contemplating an automatic drain setup just to make the process easier. I run the dual trap setup I mentioned, except there are 2 traps on the lab side of the line as well as a desiccant canister feeding my abrasive.

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minnbuckeye

@Malcolmt, @Ptychodus04, I am not intelligent, call it dumb,  when it comes to mechanical things! Wouldn't a water trap and a desiccant thingy do function the same?? Why 2 different inline additions?

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Malcolmt

You want to eliminate as much as you can before it hits the dessicant. The dessicant only can absorb so much. 

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Ptychodus04

Also, the water traps are indefinitely serviceable as you simply empty them when they get water in them. The desiccant media has to be replaced after it absorbs all the moisture it can. Using both is advised for abrasive work as you want no moisture getting to your media.

 

If you are doing scribe work only, the traps are sufficient.

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minnbuckeye

Thanks for all of the advice. Will have to pick up a desiccant canister.

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