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  2. Winner of the November 2019 Vertebrate Fossil Of The Month

    Congratulations Liam nice micro fossil Mike
  3. Beautiful fossil congratulations
  4. Winner of the November 2019 Invertebrate/Plant Fossil Of The Month

    Congratulation Greg nice specimen. Mike
  5. Sometimes You Have To Whack It !!

    Congrats, Ralph, on the new species addition to your Mazon Creek fossil collection!!!
  6. Crinoid Cups Excite Me, BUT........

    Hey Mike! Once while I was hunting in a local creek I thought I saw a beautifully-shaped, large crinoid calyx... As soon as I ran over and picked it up, I saw that I was wrong... Because it was a coconut shell!!! (What an empty coconut shell was doing in a Toronto-area creek, I have no idea) Monica
  7. Today
  8. Congrats, Greg! It's a beautiful blastoid
  9. very tiny mosquitos mating?

    Third photo. I strongly suspect it represents a more destructive event though.
  10. Pennsylvanian Holocephalian teeth

    Here are a few holocephalian teeth from the Pennsylvanian LaSalle Limestone from Illinois that I have been unable to ID. I find these teeth hard to ID since the tooth plates of a single species are often so varied in morphology, and I can rarely tell if I'm looking at a fragment or whole plate. Hopefully someone more experienced than I can tell. For the first tooth, I tooth a picture in situ before trying to split the boulder as I was afraid it would crack. Well it did unfortunately and I was only able to save a few pieces. This second tooth looks like Psammodus but I'd love a second opinion (or even a species identification if possible). And this third tooth looks like a fragment, but I really don't know. @Archie @deutscheben Let me know if you have any thoughts. Thanks.
  11. Pennsylvanian Holocephalian teeth

    Here are a few holocephalian teeth from the Pennsylvanian LaSalle Limestone from Illinois that I have been unable to ID. I find these teeth hard to ID since the tooth plates of a single species are often so varied in morphology, and I can rarely tell if I'm looking at a fragment or whole plate. Hopefully someone more experienced than I can tell. For the first tooth, I tooth a picture in situ before trying to split the boulder as I was afraid it would crack. Well it did unfortunately and I was only able to save a few pieces. This second tooth looks like Psammodus but I'd love a second opinion (or even a species identification if possible). And this third tooth looks like a fragment, but I really don't know. @Archie @deutscheben Let me know if you have any thoughts. Thanks.
  12. Fossil Bone?

    I agree, some areas resemble bone a bit. And the hole is suggestive of something of a vertebra. But the detail is just all wrong. I don't think this is bone.
  13. List of Ways Fossils are Preserved

    I hate to tell you this, but it looks like you left out "Bioimmuration" this time around. Edit: Ooops! I obviously didn't look at the bottom line
  14. This one really has me stumped. Round hollow bone?

    Ok, so on the plant nut side of things could it be a washed out and bleached Prickly Palm nut ? Acrocomia spp. In that case the smaller hole could be from a parasitic wasp ... or some such creature. Or not. I'm digging the nut line of questioning .. hmm ... no-one else gets obsessed with these odd balls ? .. too much coffee I suppose. Cheers, Brett
  15. Help identify this fossil

    I find it really something special that Missourian politicians give a home to their fossils.
  16. This one really has me stumped. Round hollow bone?

    I kept staring at this thing ..... could it be some type of sponge ? ... there are a few along these lines. These are deep water sponges. Of course the location and depth is all wrong, but still, nature has a way of repeating itself in different locations. Geodia baretti Demosponges can take on ball shapes as well ... time to cut it open !! haha I will say this is waaaay out of my wheelhouse .. but I like a visual mystery and I enjoy staring at images and heading down Google Image wormholes ! Hopefully I've just confused matters a bit. It does look a bit eroded (bio-eroded ?).. or rather ... it has been sitting in the water and rolling around for a bit. Cheers, Brett PS. Now that I think about it .. I assume the skeleton would look rather different once it is left behind ... hmmmm ...
  17. Is this megladon tooth real?

    Quality stuff, can't see any problems. I would go for it.
  18. It looks like a 100% real Bone Valley tooth and a beautiful one to boot!
  19. Crinoid Cups Excite Me, BUT........

    If you'd like to know what "time period" it is from, this is a good resource: https://aussiemetaldetecting.com/shotshell-resources/shotshell-headstamp-database/ We metal detectorists use shotgun headstamps like index fossils
  20. Hi everyone, I found this stunning piece online and am very keen to get it as my first real quality piece. My only concern is that is the quality too good to be true? I really do hope it's all it's said to be though! Seller reported no restoration or repairs done. Appreciate any thoughts on this! Thanks in advance! Cheers!
  21. List of Ways Fossils are Preserved

    Final (for now) version with 27 ways instead of 17 so it sounds more impressive. I reduced the font size to make them all fit on one page better. Thanks to everyone for all the help. Feel free to use this any way you like. 27 WAYS FOSSILS CAN BE FORMED DUPLICATION 1 Internal Mold (minerals in contact with inner surface solidifiy then original dissolves) 2 External Mold (sediment in contact with outer surface solidifies then original dissolves) 3 External Cast (original outer surface dissolves and space fills with solidifying material) 4 Internal Cast (original inner surface dissolves and space fills with solidifying material) MINERALIZATION 5 Permineralization (space between cells fills with minerals that solidify) 6 Petrification (space between cells fills with silica binding to cellulose) 7 Replacement (cells replaced with new minerals that solidify) 8 Recrystallization (replacement when the new minerals are a crystal form) DESSICATION 9 Peat Pit 10 Tar Pit 11 Frozen Tundra 12 Mummification ICHNOFOSSILS OR TRACE FOSSILS 13 Tracks 14 Infilled burrows 15 Coprolites or droppings 16 Feeding traces 17 Urolites or urine splatters 18 Regurgitants or vomit 19 Body rests 20 Gastroliths 21 Bite marks 22 Bio-sedimentological structures like stromatolites 23 Termite mounds OTHERS 24 Compression or Carbonization (thin carbon film formed by chemical change) 25 Coalification (carbonization occurring by much slower processes) 26 Resin Inclusion (Life trapped in resin which hardens into amber or copal) 27 Bioimmuration (impression formed on a shell by growing over another life form)
  22. A Good Day to Hunt in the Rain

    Great report. Wayne; I felt like I was there with you. Love the finds.
  23. Fossil Bone?

    Hello StackB and a warm welcome to TFF from Austin, Tx. You've found a great place to find out the answers to such questions. We welcome all inquiries and thrive on nubie questions because in answering them, we ourselves learn. I would agree that this is not a bone, but boy is it an interesting rock. I'm sure that many of us would have picked it up for a second look. I myself would have taken it home and added it to my "unique rocks" collection. Glad to have you as part of the forum.
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