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  2. Species Name Changes Against ICZN Code

    I think most public figures in this age of social media are pretty much inured to the (dubious) honours they get or else they wouldn't last very long. I was actually thinking of these examples after I read your initial post. There have even been occasions where scientists will name species after their scientific nemeses! One can suppose that scientists are human beings with political views just like anyone else. A less charitable view would be that those who choose to use their "naming rights" to be cheeky, satirical, or make political statements might be doing a somewhat childish disservice to the privilege of naming a new taxon. But as scientists are human beings, and humans have their own motivations and ego, we should not be surprised by the wide variation of motivations that go into naming. Of course, revising taxons for political reasons post facto is simply unnecessary and veers into serious ethical questions.
  3. Mosasaurus or Something Else?

    Mosasaur pterygoid teeth can be found much smaller than that. Size, alone, is too variable a characteristic to determine tooth ownership. The shape, surface character, geology, and size suggest this is a mosasaur pterygoid tooth.
  4. Show Us Your Starfish (And Brittle Stars)

    And a bad photo or two of a starfish from the Jurassic Solnhofen limestone.
  5. Show Us Your Starfish (And Brittle Stars)

    Ophiuroid , Morocco
  6. Show Us Your Starfish (And Brittle Stars)

    Petraster, Morocco.
  7. Species Name Changes Against ICZN Code

    I suspect that some scientists are bringing politics into science by the creative names given to new species. I wonder if George W. Bush, Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld thought that it was a honor to have slime beetles named after them? Link Of any US president, Obama has the most species named after him including that of a blood fluke and a parasitic worm: link Here’s an article about a moth named after Trump. link Lots of interesting new species get named after celebrities: the good, the bad and the ugly.
  8. Kem Kem bone - What is this?

    Thank you!
  9. Show Us Your Starfish (And Brittle Stars)

    Ophiopinna, france Asteriacites ichnofossils, france Geocoma, germany Argoviaster, france
  10. Stating the obvious - no fossils in the Hillsborough

    For the record, I only return to maybe 20% of new areas I explore. Some have nothing; others just a few things on the first hit, then obviously downhill from there for various reasons. It takes discipline to explore, especially when you know another site is guaranteed to give up more of the same old stuff. Exploring may not pay off today, but over time generally does.
  11. Rapp beach hunting

    It took him 16 years to find the Atocha!
  12. Rapp beach hunting

    Very nice. i'd be happy with that lot.
  13. Today
  14. Rapp beach hunting

    A few nice teeth are better than none. Go out everyday like Mel Fisher and "say today's the day"!
  15. My Wife's Jurassic Ammonite Finds from Europe 2011

    While walking out, our friend Jean-Louis spotted this killer Porpoceras, and handed it to my wife. I was afraid to mess it up with aggressive prep, so I saved it for last, when I'd hopefully be at the top of my prep game for material from Belmont. We like it.
  16. Kem Kem bone - What is this?

    100% a fish braincase.
  17. My Wife's Jurassic Ammonite Finds from Europe 2011

    More lady luck.
  18. Species Name Changes Against ICZN Code

    Indeed, which is why the statement of "nobody really cares" is inaccurate. However, it would not be the first -- and doubtfully the last -- time politics interferes with science.
  19. My Wife's Jurassic Ammonite Finds from Europe 2011

    The underlying Aalenian layer was equally as impressive, if not more so. Ammonites could be found loose as well as in blocks studded with belemnites. Here are some loose ones my wife found. Last 2 pics are forward and reverse of a double.
  20. My Wife's Jurassic Ammonite Finds from Europe 2011

    Awesome that you have a partner that enjoys this sort of thing too...
  21. Species Name Changes Against ICZN Code

    They are bringing politics into science. Uncalled for and an insult to the scientific community worldwide.
  22. My Wife's Jurassic Ammonite Finds from Europe 2011

    More Belmont.
  23. My Wife's Jurassic Ammonite Finds from Europe 2011

    One of our favorite spots in France was the Lafarge Quarry at Belmont, near Lyon. Insanely productive. There were at least 100 collectors there that morning, many "in the know" showing up with wagons. We only had about 4 hours to collect, but everyone was finding ammonites, gastropods, bivalves, and belemnites hand over fist for the entire time, even walking out. First, let's look at what my wife found in the overlying Toarcian layer. First 2 pics are forward and reverse of the same specimen.
  24. Amazingly Small Osteoderm

    Jack, I don't know if you got your answer but I purchased similar osteoderms. They were found in N. Florida, Pleistocene and he said they were Holmesina Septentrionalis, not Glytodon. Here is the pic.
  25. My Wife's Jurassic Ammonite Finds from Europe 2011

    More from Gräfenberg.
  26. Species Name Changes Against ICZN Code

    Well, obviously some people do care, such as those in the scientific community who oppose the politicization that goes with these name changes, Armenians, and the OP.
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