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  • MikeR

    The End Of My Pliocene Project

    By MikeR

    When I began this blog late in 2010, my intention was to report on recent field trips however, with the exception of one excursion each into the Upper Miocene, Lower Pliocene and the Calabrian Pleistocene, all of my posts have concentrated on the Upper Pliocene of the US Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains. I already had an extensive collection of Florida Upper Pliocene invertebrates that I had collected while a resident of the state in the late 80s and early 90s. The fossils from these beds are
    • 9 comments
    • 7,574 views
  • andreas

    The Columbianus Zone/alaunium 2/ Norium/upper Triassic, In The So Called “Hallstatt Limestone” Of The Northern Calcareous Alps In Austria

    By andreas

    The columbianus Zone/Alaunium 2/ Norium/Upper Triassic in the so called "Hallstatt Limestone" of the Northern Calcareous Alps in Austria Dear Fossil Forum members! This pictured report about the ammonite bearing Triassic Hallstatt limestone will be the first one of a continuous series of reports. Since the beginning of the geological research in the Northern Calcareous Alps of Austria in the 19th century, about 500 species of Triassic ammonites have been described from the Hallstatt limestone
    • 14 comments
    • 10,800 views
  • MikeR

    The Problem with Siphocypraea

    By MikeR

    For millennia, humankind has been fascinated by the hard-external shell of the organisms classified within the Phylum Mollusca.   Consumed first as food, their empty shells have served multiple functions in the past; as tools in many ancient cultures, in religious ceremonies by the Aztecs, and money by Pacific Islanders. During the Age of Discovery, sailors could supplement their meager incomes by selling exotic seashells to wealthy gentlemen for their Cabinets of Curiosity.  Today many people f
    • 3 comments
    • 1,849 views
  • JohnJ

    Ancient Hunters

    By JohnJ

    June 5, 2010 Barry held his camera barely two feet away from the back of an Agkistrodon piscivorus. Although a small snake, it was still very dangerous and he positioned his camera based on years of experience with these reptiles. Known more commonly as a Cottonmouth or Water Moccasin, the twelve inch juvenile snake had coloration similar to the closely related Copperhead. However, its patterns were muted by late afternoon shadows in a remote location that was not favorable to an easy medic
    • 26 comments
    • 7,285 views

Geopaleo Poem

I was surfing the web recently and came across a site whose members collect rocks that have faces in them. Here is a quick link to it… http://www.cst.cmich.edu/users/dietr1rv/mimetoliths/ It’s interesting to me. I turned to my wife and told her, “Wow, I’m gonna have to keep my eyes open for rocks like these and start collecting them!” Well, to put it bluntly, she puts up with my collecting, if I keep them picked up and don’t wash to much mud down her kitchen sink while scrubbing that latest fos

Kehbe

Kehbe

Tamiami Formation, Bed 11

Between 2.5 and 4.5 mya most of Florida south of St. Petersburg was submerged under a cold but warming sea. The series of sand, shell and limestone deposited during this time is named the Tamiami Formation. In April 2011, I visited one of the famed Sarasota shell pits exposing primarily Beds 10 and 11 of the Tamiami Formation, my locality 1016 (fig. 1). My earlier days at APAC were spent collecting from a mixture of beds 1-11, so I was excited that I could collect in a biostratigraphically re

MikeR

MikeR

Whiskey Bridge - Faunal Community - Most Common Species, And Other Info (Updated 28 August)

Here are the top common species and counts at WB, as per Emerson's book. Coral - Turbinolia pharetra 1000 (common, ranges from 5mm and up) Bivalve - Anomia lisbonensis 1000 (fairly large) Bivalve - Barbatia (Barbatia) uxorispalmeri 1000 Bivalve - Notocorbula texana 1000 Gastropod - Latirus moorei 1000 Gastropod - Polinices aratus 600 (very common snail, as a Naticid, drills holes in prey) Bivalve - Vokesula smithvillensis petropolitana 500 Gastropod - Buccitriton texanum 500 (v

steve p.

steve p.

...and Now For Something Completely Different !

Business travel through the years has been very good for me in regards to fossils. My entire collection of Texas Cretaceous and Eocene and west coast Cenozoic was collected when time was available in afternoons or late evenings after work. My latest trip took me to London and Cambridge, England. I cashed in some airline points to take the Mrs. along and the plan was to sightsee in London on the weekend before moving on to Cambridge to work. I consider myself a natural history museum junkie a

MikeR

MikeR

Whiskey Bridge - Links And Documents (Updated 22 August)

There is quite a bit of Whiskey Bridge reference material available online. Here are my favorites: Geology Related Links Good description of the geology of the location. Helps you understand the Eocene environment and the forces that caused the sediments to be deposited. Locally here.Yancy1995-2.pdf Here is an easier to read (but much less info) summary of the Stone City member of the Crocket Group. Locally here. OutcropDescription.pdf Fossil Info or Photos Photos of commonly fou

steve p.

steve p.

Hummmmmm Chaps Or Boots?

Well I suffer through the summer not going out hunting for fear of snakes so Im thinking of investing in some PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) I found this site: http://www.snakeboots.com/ and Im trying figure out should I get chaps or boots but I have to admit.... I really want a full suit and helmet oh and stilts these will do http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&pq=stilts&xhr=t&q=stilts+for+sale&cp=8&rlz=1I7GCNV_en&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&biw=1162&a

Ameenah

Ameenah

Pliocene-Pleistocene Molluscan Species Identification--Part 2.

When I first began this blog, my intent was to post field reports and species lists from my collecting trips. Since I was working on my North Carolina material at the time, I started there and was preparing to report on my Alabama trips into the Paleocene and Eocene. Two separate events however changed my directed course. Foremost of the two was my trip to two shell pits in Florida exposing the fabulously rich shell beds of the Tamiami Formation. I have enjoyed researching and reporting abou

MikeR

MikeR

Yorktown Formation, Zone 2, Rushmere Member

Approximately 4.5 million years ago, the Albemarle basin in North Carolina was a cool temperate ocean much like that off the coast of Alaska today. Although cold, the offshore waters supported a rich and diverse ecosystem due to the upwelling of deep nutrient rich water. Placopecten clintonius scallops along with young Chesapecten jeffersonius clapped their shells together in an attempt to escape from shell crushing rays. Chesapecten as they aged would eventually develop thick heavy shells an

MikeR

MikeR

Limericks And Rhymes

==================================== There once was a man from Buffalo He wasn't satisfied with Mid Devonian, he wanted Low He dreamed of Euryptids, that he could call his, He'd better go to a fossil show ==================================== thank you fossil forum i didn't know what my fossils were when I saw em i brought home concretions with interesting features now i dont have to bring home any moreofum ===================================== there once was a state called Florida,

xonenine

xonenine

Haiku

=========================== fear not La Brean though your struggles are in vain sleep for just awhile ========================== no sound but water i will trade with you fossil its my turn to sleep ========================= You heard me above Walking in the winter snow Did you count the days ========================= cruel teeth of winter gnashing in desperation Ill get you next year

xonenine

xonenine

The Story Of The Monster Tooth From Big Brook

Alright, in 2003 it was the second year of my dad and my trip to big brook. this time, we brought my older sister and her friend. we dug in the pit for hours (they sat on logs, how helpful ) we found a decent amount. suddenly, my dad finds a fish tooth (now remembering it was probably a good puny goblin). he gave it to the girls to look at. u wont believe it. THEY DROPPED IT! my dad was so ##### and dug desperatly in the spot of the brook were the tooth was dropped. in the first sift, we did

fossilman7

fossilman7

Whale Vert?

here is the link to the info on this post ur replys perferably on this forum i.d. link. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php/topic/21609-whale-vert/ thanx!

fossilman7

fossilman7

Yorktown Formation, Sunken Meadow Member

If anyone comes away with a message from reading my blog, it should be that things change. The earth is constantly going through periods of warming and cooling which affect not only sea levels and ocean currents, but also organisms adapted to their environment. Profound environmental change leads to extinction, but pushes evolutionary factors to refill empty niches with new species. Rivers in the Albemarle basin of northeastern North Carolina cut through four distinct shell beds that trace mo

MikeR

MikeR

Fossil Art

I just got a new photo app on my iphone which I love. I thought I would share my results. I really like the aged ones.

Ameenah

Ameenah

Lock 3

I found a boat access on my iphone gps called "lock 3" in Hendersonville,tn. Its small and has sand that I thought may have been shiped in, but when I looked under some over turned trees the sand was there also. It had thousands of these lovely little shells scattered all over the shore line . I'm wondering what kind they are. I cant wait to go back it was so relaxing. As soon as the the cicadas leave I'll go back

Ameenah

Ameenah

Planning A Big Brook Trip

its that time of the year again.......time for big brook fossiling! late june muda-fossil hunters with 6 years under my belt, i need no advice. but i has never found a mosasaur tooth, and i will take a snake, rip it open with my teeth, eat its intestines while its still alive, even get salmonela, to get a nice mosasaur tooth. any tips? P.S.any idea where i should go next in the brook or nj for that matter? ive been all the way to the "bush" area .5 miles to the left of the big brook entrence. i

fossilman7

fossilman7

What A Dam Morning

I went to one of our Dams to see if I could find anything. All I found we're some questionable rocks with what could be trace fossils of some sort. The rocks look like they had been trucked in from somewhere, so I dont know what location they are from.

Ameenah

Ameenah

Eastover Formation, Cobham Bay Member

In 2010, I had the opportunity to collect on the Roanoke and Meherrin Rivers which feed into Albemarle Sound in northern coastal North Carolina. Boating on both of these rivers is always enjoyable due to large numbers of bald eagles on the Roanoke and extensive stands of Cypress trees on the Meherrin (fig. 1). Besides their natural beauty, between the two are exposed a little more than six million years of strata stretching from the Upper Miocene to Upper Pliocene. Figure 1. Cypress swamp

MikeR

MikeR

The Zones Of Austrotrachyceras Austriacum And Trachyceras Aonoides

The Zones of Austrotrachyceras austriacum and Trachyceras aonoides, Triassic/Karnium/Julium of the Alps Written by Andreas Spatzenegger Dear Fossil Forum members! This report will introduce you to the ammonite-zones of Trachyceras aonoides and Trachyceras austriacum within the Hallstatt limestone in Austria. Both zones are ammonoid zones of the Julian, which is the lower stage of the Carnian. These two zones are comparable with the North American Desatoyense (in most parts), Obesum and Nans

andreas

andreas

The Act Of Betrayal And The Thrill Of Victory

well, im leaving vegas tonight. for those of u who read my blogs,(like 2 pple) u know i was spending a week in vegas and going to red rock canyon on sunday. well in search of a good hike/fossiling. i was so disappointed in not finding much at the canyon. so, we decided to look for a place called fossil canyon at blue diamond hill. a man said to turn like 3 miles ago,but we couldn't find it. disappointed, we went home. thats when i thought of researching this place. we then woke up a 7 and went

fossilman7

fossilman7

Vegas!

well, i finally got to fabolus las vegas. sunday im gonna hike red rock canyon. my "aunt" good friend says her students (teacher) said they found fossils there. wish me luck!

fossilman7

fossilman7

What I Found Sunday

I went to my sunday spot that is in the back of an industrial park. I found a trilo fragment and I think a few flint nodulesand more. I'm sorry about the pics i had to use my iphone

Ameenah

Ameenah

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