Jump to content
Ptychodus anonymus
 


Ptychodus anonymus.

I am unsure of the ID. Please let me know if wrong. 

From the album:

Cenomanian Shark Teeth and other Marine Fauna, Ryazan Oblast, Russia

  • 106 images
  • 0 comments
  • 4 image comments

Photo Information for Ptychodus anonymus


Recommended Comments

Chase E. - are you certain about the Cenomanian age for all of your recently posted Ptychodus fossils?  Certainly, Ptychodus anonymous is present in strata aged from the early Cenomanian to middle Turonian.  You definitely have many of that species.  The large upper medial file (UMF) of the P. marginalis is likely correct.  But, it is a very large sized one for UMF - or a pathological version. The smaller Ptychodus teeth are more difficult to diagnose, but you may have them correctly identified.  I am most curious about the 0.92 cm tooth and another 1.55 cm similar one.  If they are Coniacian or Santonian age, then they might be Ptychodus rugosus instead of P. anonymous per the outwardly angled crown centerline and fairly high crown peak.  Some of the P. anonymous identified teeth with more flat-topped crowns could possibly be P. mammillaris. But, that would only be possible if the age of the original formation from which they were recovered was Coniacian. Otherwise, you appear to have been correct with the IDs. 

Link to comment
On 5/21/2020 at 11:06 PM, LSCHNELLE said:

Chase E. - are you certain about the Cenomanian age for all of your recently posted Ptychodus fossils?  Certainly, Ptychodus anonymous is present in strata aged from the early Cenomanian to middle Turonian.  You definitely have many of that species.  The large upper medial file (UMF) of the P. marginalis is likely correct.  But, it is a very large sized one for UMF - or a pathological version. The smaller Ptychodus teeth are more difficult to diagnose, but you may have them correctly identified.  I am most curious about the 0.92 cm tooth and another 1.55 cm similar one.  If they are Coniacian or Santonian age, then they might be Ptychodus rugosus instead of P. anonymous per the outwardly angled crown centerline and fairly high crown peak.  Some of the P. anonymous identified teeth with more flat-topped crowns could possibly be P. mammillaris. But, that would only be possible if the age of the original formation from which they were recovered was Coniacian. Otherwise, you appear to have been correct with the IDs. 

Hello,

I am pretty certain about the age of these specimens. The locality has presented its own challenges with some of the fauna present In the quarry these were found in. There is currently a paper being written on the locality. While I'm not a part in this paper's creation, I have kept tabs on the progress, and they've seemed to note that a lot of the fauna present in the locality is out of place. All specimens from this quarry have come from the Late Cenomanian, but they've discovered younger species of marine reptile, and older species of other fauna. I believe it might be a freak instance in this one locality, as the general faunal assemblage matches up perfectly with Late Cenomanian assemblages from France. 

Link to comment

Okay, then.  I think you have got it right. P. marginalis and P. anonymous. Late Cenomanian. 

Link to comment
×
×
  • Create New...