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  1. Making the most of the last of my unplanned leave from work, I decided to make a trip to the Eocene Upper Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation in Colorado. Unfortunately, the road was not plowed and there was isolated patches of snow on the ground: I decided to walk the 5 miles to the site anyway through snow, slush and mud., although other parts seemed clear and pleasant Mostly, it looked like this though. I didn't count on the extra effort it takes to walk through hilly landscape with slush and mud, which made the walk seem longer than it wa
  2. oilshale

    Masillosteus janeae Grande, 2010

    From the album: Vertebrates

    Masillosteus janeae Grande, 2010 Eocene Lutetium Kemmerer Wyoming USA Length 17" / 42cm And this is the other of the two short snouted gars from the Green River Formation: Cuneatus (Lepisosteus) cuneatus Cope, 1878 Lit.: Grande, L. (2010): AN EMPIRICAL SYNTHETIC PATTERN STUDY OF GARS (LEPISOSTEIFORMES) AND CLOSELY RELATED SPECIES, BASED MOSTLY ON SKELETAL ANATOMY. THE RESURRECTION OF HOLOSTEI. Copeia, 2010, No 2A, 1-863
  3. Hi everyone! Today is received a bunch of unidentified fossil shark teeth found in a now closed sand quarry in Lede Sand, Lede Formation, Balegem, Oosterzele, Belgium (Eocene, Lutetian, 44 mya). I was hoping some of you might help me out with confirming the ID's of the teeth. I have some idea's what the ID might be, but I am not entirely sure about most. Tooth 1 & 2: Definiatly Sandtiger teeth with fine stiations on the crown. That makes me believe that these are probably Striatolamia macrota Tooth 3: Same goes for this one, I also be
  4. Hey all! Between an ill-timed conference, election month, the pandemic, online teaching, and a few other issues, I was way too stressed out and busy to be on here regularly since October. Also, in mid November we began digging up a small basilosaurid whale in Harleyville, SC - very likely to be the most completely known specimen of the dwarf basilosaurid Chrysocetus, and perhaps the most important basilosaurid discovery in North America of my lifetime. I did manage to write a blog post about our fieldwork, so as an apology for being AWOL and only getting back to identifying cetacea
  5. Hello, I have been going through some fossils that I bought a while back. I came across this agatized snail from Morocco. I’ve tried to find more information on these agatized snails, but have been unable to find much. Some sellers online say that they come from Assa, Morocco, while others say they come from the Dakhla region. I’m also wondering what species this little guy belongs to, and a more precise age for these gastropods, although I’m pretty sure they are Eocene. Does anyone have any information regarding these agatized snails?
  6. ClearLake

    North Florida Fun!

    My wife and I returned from a great trip to north Florida about a week and a half ago, but I finally have time to post a trip report now that our Easter visitors (our kids) have left and headed back to their homes. Fair warning, if you are looking for some great tale of finds on the Peace River, this is not the post for you! Probably one of the few posts on the Forum from a trip to Florida that does NOT include the Peace –. This was not solely a fossil trip, but rather a sight-seeing trip with some fossils stops included, I try to include as many stops as possible but it is always a delica
  7. For the last week before confinement contrainsts, I decide to go to the southwest coast of Atlantic Ocean to find fossils I begin to the coast near Biarritz and eocene level. But it's difficult to dig here because there is a lot of constructions I've just found a level with fossil wood. But I think it's pliocene level I go to the south by the beach. The sea is high and I prospect on isolated blocks. I see a rarety. A bit of Cidaris. The first I see in this eocene level I continue and arrive at a geological point. T
  8. Generally, the genus is assigned to the family Amphilemuridae, which according to some researchers is more closely related to today's hedgehogs (Erinaceidae). According to other studies, a closer relationship to the elephant shrews (family Macroscelididae) is also considered for the family. Taxonomy according to Fossilworks. Diagnosis for Pholidocercus hassiacus von Königswald & Storch 1983 (translated from German by oilshale): “A stout, ground-dwelling animal of a good 35 cm total length (head trunk just under 20 cm, tail a good 15 cm). In biological adaptation typ
  9. Fossilizable

    Eocene curiosity

    This piece of arkosic sandstone from the late Eocene Coldwater formation north of Santa Paula, CA, has a few marine species traces. It would be great if anyone could ID the bivalves, but what really seems different is the set of chevrons I've pointed to in the top photo. Maybe it's just two bivalves wedged together to look like one? Appreciate the help!
  10. oilshale

    Atracosteus simplex (Leidy, 1873)

    From the album: Vertebrates

    Atracosteus simplex (Leidy, 1873) former name: Lepisosteus simplex Middle Eocene Green River Formation Kemmerer Wyoming USA Length 40 cm
  11. Hi guys hope everyone’s having a great Easter, if you celebrate it. A few days ago I got to go fossil hunting for the first time in monthswhile it wasn’t the most productive as the beds were covered by sand and not much erosion had taken place but I found enough in some micro matrix I bought home to warrant a trip report The geology of bracklesham bay To the left, the yellow is wittering fm. Some fossils can be found here but not many. The best area to hunt is the green earnley fm. Which produces the most abundant fossils, here is a photo of it when exposed
  12. will stevenson

    Lutetian Phalange

    Hi guys, found this in the lutetian earnley formation of Bracklesham bay today and i was wondering if anyone could help me identify it, as bones like this are rare and i havent had any experience identifying them. I find turtle phalange the most likely but crocodilian or even mammalian is a possibility thanks for your help I must add, sorry for the awful photography, my lamp is broken so i needed to use flash
  13. bigulica

    Eocene matrix specimens

    Hello guys. I have found this collection of specimens on the matrix on the eocene era site near city of Vrgorac, Republic of Croatia. In my humble opinion, it is quite interesting, considering the number of different species included. In other words, there is really a lot going on So far, I have only identified some kind of solitary coral (picture 2 and 3) and several species of nummulites (pictures 4,5 and 6). I would greatly appreciate any help with identification of other specimens. Thank you in advance.
  14. Mahnmut

    Basilosaurid neural spine?

    Hello together, I just got a package in the mail, that is less fun than fossil hunting outside, but still I like what I see. I got no information on locality or age, but I can assume north africa. It was sold as Basilosaurus neural spine. What I don´t understand is the proximal surface of the left one, it doesn´t look fractured, rather like a complete bone/articulation surface. Also I am not sure if the size is right for Basilosaurus itself. Although I spent some time tinkering with whale anatomy, I have never seen a basilosaurid bone up close, so I am out of my exper
  15. Fossil_finder_

    Lucky Chubutensis

    I was hunting a site on the Potomac looking for some Eocene and Miocene fossils yesterday. When I got to the site I found this gorgeous snake vertebrae about 15 minutes into my trip, so I knew it was going to be a good day. After that it was slow collecting for the next few hours, I was only picking up a tooth every once in a while despite the incredible conditions. But then, 10 minutes before I was about to leave I stumbled upon my best chubutensis yet at about 2 3/4 in. (or 7 cm) rolling around in the surf. One that I have been dreaming about ever since a starting collecting two years
  16. bigulica

    Eocene solitary corals

    Hello guys, As a begginer in the world of fossil hunting, I would appreciate your help with identification of several coral specimens I have found in the eocene era fossil site near the town of Vrgorac, Republic of Croatia. My guess, at least for the first specimen (first 4 photos), is that it represent some kind of Pattalophyllia, whilst for the others I honestly have no idea. Also, the last specimen (last 3 photos), looks like some kind of horn coral, which is weird, considering the fact that they went extinct during Permian and especially because it wa
  17. A report about paleontology of a classic, but now overgrown, section of sediments at Montgomery Landing (Creola Bluff) on the Red River, Grant Parish, Louisiana, is now available online as PDF file from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This report is about research conducted to mitigate the destruction of this location by the construction of the Red river Waterway. The report is: Schiebout, J.A. and van den Bold, W.A., 1982. Paleontological Investigations in the Vicinity of Montgomery Landing, Red River Waterway. Report prepared for Department of the Army Cor
  18. Septal ornamentation often refletcs the microstucture of the septum. It can be observed in specimens without special preparation simply by observing them carefully. Upper margin, inner margin, external margin and lateral faces are important details to take into account. Today I'm going to show you some examples of septal lateral faces ornamentation. As always, I hope that it are to the liking and interest of that select group that I have called "coral lovers". Let's start with smooth lateral septal face in an indeterminate solitary coral from de middle Eocene (Bartonian) of South Py
  19. From the album: Vertebrates

    Pseudosparnodus microstomus (Agassiz, 1839) Eocene Lutetian Monte Bolca near Verona Italy
  20. oilshale

    Asineops squamifrons COPE, 1870

    Asineops (Greek for "donkey-faced") squamifrons was first described by Cope as having an affinity to the pirat perch family. Later, with more detailed study, this species was found to lack the diagnostic characters of that family. Thus it is not yet clearly assignable to order. Although this species is much rarer in the Fossil Lake sediments than in Lake Gosiute deposits, the specimens from Fossil Lake are much larger than those from Lake Gosiute. Reference: Edward D. Cope (1870): Observations on the Fishes of the Tertiary Shales of Green Nov. River, Wyoming Territory. Proc. A
  21. OregonFossil

    Help with ID....

    My wife found this in some talus. It is 5mm long axis. Image was taken with a G9/Oly 60mm with extension tubes (2x). Is this a Crinoid? Looks like the feeding part. Any Ideas on what this fossils is? Keasey Formation, late Eocene. Mostly Mollusk and Gastropods however Crinoids are listed as being found in this location but rare.
  22. bigulica

    Eocene myliobatis palate

    Hi guys. I have found a fossil for whom I presume is a myliobatis palate (medial). It was found in the eocene era site in Croatia, near city of Vrgorac. Thank you in advance.
  23. oilshale

    Eurohippus messelensis

    From the album: Vertebrates

    Eurohippus messelensis (Propalaeotherium messelense) Haupt 1925 Eocene Lutetian Messel near Darmstadt Germany Length 62cm / 24" in foal, some of the bones belong to a fetus This DAWN HORSE is comparable in age and size to the one found in Kemmerer (Eohippus or Hyracotherium)
  24. jikohr

    Micro Stone City shark teeth

    Hi everyone, I'm trying to id some very small shark teeth for an independent research paper I'm writing and am a little unsure on my ids. I took some photos of some typical specimens and was hoping to get some feedback. The scale bar is mm. I put what I think the species is with each group of photos. Any feedback and tips for differentiating these species would be greatly appreciated.
  25. Crankyjob21

    Green river formation fish

    Got a sweet slab of green river fish today but I’m not sure on what type of fish they are, I’m pretty sure ones a knightia, but could someone give me an ID on the others
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