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  1. I found this fossilized sea biscuit a few years ago in Holden Beach, North Carolina. Curious what species it is, and the approximate age.
  2. Anchiornis

    Greens Mill Run

    Hi all, it's been a long time since I posted here. I'm thinking about going to Greens Mill Run (Greenville, NC) next weekend. Would the water levels be about right or might it not be a good idea?
  3. Kimmi911

    Greenville, NC

    Does someone know if the water level at Greens mill run in Greenville, NC is at a level that is good for fossil hunting? We are supposed to leave tomorrow to go for a week but now not sure if the water level is too high. Will someone please help me? Also is there fossil hunting expeditions that anyone knows of that will be good?
  4. DiligentEyes

    North Carolina Dilemma

    Hi everyone, I want to start by saying I am new to the site, so I apologize if I do something incorrect commit a faux pas. I am a younger gentleman in college living in North Carolina; my father instilled a love for fossils in me from a young age, and as I grew up I would explore beaches and phosphate piles. Even though it is just a hobby, I put a lot into fossil hunting; my interest was always beyond the surface level of "I love shark teeth," and I have done countless hours of research. This brings me to the present day where I call your wisdom and guidance. Unfortuna
  5. BellamyBlake

    Southeastern United States Sharks

    I received a lot of teeth from the Southeastern United States today. I couldn't identify three. While many of these came from Bone Valley, I can't say for certain that these three are from that locality. The only provenance I have to go with is the Southeastern United States. Here are front and back shots for each of the three teeth. The first two are 1/4", while the last one is 1/8". Each has cusps. I would appreciate any help with this. Thank you, Bellamy
  6. This is from the Aurora North Carolina matrix. I have tried to ID this little tooth (4 mm) and have been unable to find a match. It seems different than any of the others I've come across. Any help will be appreciated! Plus here's a few other things that I'd love an ID if possible! Thanks y'all! 1. 2. Also found this tooth (assuming it is probably a fish tooth?) 4mm also 3.and then this thing - also thinking it's something "fishy" ? 6 mm
  7. Thanks to a post from Candace ( @thelivingdead531 ) I found out about the Aurora Fossil Museum's box o' matrix that they sell! (all moneys benefit the museum, which was a bonus). I got two Gallon Bags of matrix to sift through and wow....some really great stuff! They send a really good ID sheet too. But of course, there's even more info here on the FF! So here are some of my favorite finds so far. I've only gone through about 6 cups of matrix!! SO MUCH MATRIX! I havn't really done much ID'ing yet (the shark teeth) but my favorite by far is the crab stuff....love those pincers!! And the colo
  8. Maisch IV, H.M., Becker, M.A. and Chamberlain Jr, J.A., 2018. Lamniform and Carcharhiniform Sharks from the Pungo River and Yorktown Formations (Miocene–Pliocene) of the Submerged Continental Shelf, Onslow Bay, North Carolina, USA. Copeia, 106(2), pp.353-374. Maisch IV, H.M., Becker, M.A. and Chamberlain Jr, J.A., 2020. Macroborings in Otodus megalodon and Otodus chubutensis shark teeth from the submerged shelf of Onslow Bay, North Carolina, USA: implications for processes of lag deposit formation. Ichnos, 27(2), pp.122-141 More papers from John A. Chamberlain Jr, City
  9. buntingw

    Tooth ID

    Tooth identification needed for two separate finds. Found in Southport, NC (Brunswick County) near the Cape Fear inlet. Common place for bones too wash ashore. Teeth are a new find. Pictures below. Thanks!
  10. Hey everyone, I'll be in Wilmington, North Carolina for a wedding next week and I'm super excited to check out GMR for the first time. I expect the water will be frigid, to say the least. Does anyone in the area know how high the water level is now? I know a guy who may have hip waders or boots I could borrow, but it would be a huge bummer if we got there and I found out the water level was too high for either of those. They're too bulky to pack in carry-on luggage, so bringing my own pair isn't an option. On that note, if anyone knows of a place nearby (Greenville or Wilmington) w
  11. daves64

    Snaggletooth shark teeth?

    A while back I was given 2 beautiful, mostly perfect shark teeth from Aurora, North Carolina. Pic's 1 & 2 (same tooth) is just shy of 20 mm. Pic's 3 & 4 (same tooth) is 22 mm. Are these snaggletooth shark? I love the colors on both of them.
  12. ClearLake

    Waccamaw Mystery Fossils

    Can anyone tell me what these small items are. They sort of look like little mushrooms with what seems to be a circular attachment type area and then an "upper" surface with very small dots or small bumps. The grid is 5mm on a side so these things are about 2mm x 2mm. These come from the Early Pleistocene aged Waccamaw Formation of North Carolina. From the looks and color of them, they seem like they should be Echinoderm related, but I am just guessing. I am not familiar with them and figured since I found quite a few of them, they must be something worth identifying. Perhaps @sixgill
  13. phhill18

    Fossil Nautilus?

    Hi there - Been following this forum for years now but this is my first time posting! Figured I should finally try to figure out what this mystery fossil is that I have... Years ago - probably 10 years ago at this point - I found this fossil washed up on the beach at Bald Head Island NC. Because of its markings, I assumed it was likely a nautilus, but everything I found online or in fossil books of NC looked dissimilar from this particular piece. So, I'll ask you all - what do you think it is? Am I right to think it's a nautilus of some kind, or perhaps something e
  14. ClearLake

    Waccamaw Gastropods II

    I have been working through a bag of matrix that I received from @sixgill pete from the Waccamaw Formation (Pleistocene) of North Carolina. Earlier I showed a couple of interesting bryozoans that I picked from the matrix (Waccamaw Bryozoan) and the first group of gastropods (Waccamaw Gastropods I). From the 1 quart bag of matrix, I pulled out over 60 different species of gastropods and am up to about 45 species of bivalves! This post represents the second group of gastropods that I have some identification questions about. Again, these are all very small, most are only a few mm's. I appre
  15. ClearLake

    Waccamaw Gastropods I

    I have been working through a bag of matrix that I received from @sixgill pete from the Waccamaw Formation (Pleistocene) of North Carolina. Earlier I showed a couple of interesting bryozoans that I picked from the matrix (Waccamaw Bryozoan) and now I am finishing up on the gastropods. From the 1 quart bag of matrix, I pulled out over 60 different species of gastropods! The biggest ones were a couple of Olive shells at about 2 inches tall as well as about a half dozen other gastropods that are big enough to easily view with the naked eye, but by far the vast majority of the shells are quite
  16. Hi everyone! Little over a week ago I recieved some new bags of microfossil matrix and this time there was a bag with material from the Lee Creek Mine, Yorktown Formation, Aurora, North Carolina, USA (Miocene, 14,5 mya) This material is quite rich in shark teeth as I found little over 90 shark teeth in it. I have photographed a couple of them already and posted them in my microfossil topic. But since I doubt I will get many help with the identification of the teeth there I am going to repost the first batch of teeth here (I apologize for the repost admins) and upload the re
  17. Here is a picture of a Bivalve imprint I found whilst in a Creek in Western Wake County. I was in the Triassic Basin and they have fossils dating back around 230 Ma ± 2 ma. It was part of the Carnian Stage of the Triassic part of the bigger Newark Supergroup. I presume it is a freshwater genus but I don't hear much about freshwater Bivalves when it comes to Triassic fossils.
  18. Praefectus

    Aurora Shark Tooth ID Help

    Hello. I found this tooth about a year and a half ago in the spoil piles outside the Aurora Fossil Museum. I was wondering if anyone could help me identify it? I think it might be a mako tooth (Isurus oxyrinchus?). Also, does anyone know why one side of the root is much smaller than the other? Is that damage? Or maybe due to jaw position? Thanks for your help.
  19. slkdragon

    Carolina Coast Vertebra

    Hey there! New user, and probably not likely to stick around for long if I'm honest. I've just never had much of an affinity for forums, I'm afraid. That said, I have been absorbed by this particular specimen for several decades. The only suggestion I've heard so far is some kind of whale, but I was curious if I could narrow it down a bit more. Also, I'm not an expert, but it seems pretty different from most whale vertebrae I've looked up. That said, there are a lot of bones in a lot of kinds of whales out there, so I could easily, easily be wrong in my skepticism. This
  20. TaterSaurus

    Need Help to Identify

    Hello. I came across this fossil recently while at GMR in Greenville, North Carolina. I was hoping someone would be able to tell me what it came from & what part. My friend I went with thought it was some sort of jawbone piece. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
  21. AvaLily

    Fossil Long Bone? Please ID.

    Hello, My daughter found this in our creek today after a bad rain storm. We think it is a fossil of a long bone. It seems to have a layer of perioteum on the outside with vertical striations, and horizontal striations underneath (Sharpy's fibers?). It is heavy and dense. Can you please help me confirm that this is a bone? And if so, can it be identified more specifically? Thank you so much!!
  22. ClearLake

    Waccamaw Bryozoan

    A few months back I won an auction from @sixgill pete and part of the lot was a bag of matrix from the Waccamaw Formation in Columbus County North Carolina. The Waccamaw Fm. is a marine sand and shell hash that has been correlated numerous different ways with a varying range of ages applied to it in the past, but as it is currently interpreted, it is Pleistocene in age (Gelasian and Calabrian Stages or Upper Blancan to Irvingtonian if you prefer the NA names) and found in South Carolina and southeastern North Carolina. The bag was chock full of molluscan goodies and I am steadily
  23. Dinosaur teeth from North Carolina are very rare to come by. There are only a small handful of sites where they have come from. One of the sites is well known, but the others are a closely guarded secret. Those of you who have been lucky to find such things, let's see your pictures. Not mosasaurs, not plesiosaurs but land dwelling dinosaurs. Here are mine. First a Tyrannosauroidea indet. There are two known Tyrannosaurids from N.C. Dryptosaurus and Appalachasaurus.The small size of this tooth will most likely keep it from being able to be ID'd
  24. GayleMG

    Shark tooth? North Carolina

    I found this tooth (same tooth, two sides) in some phosphate mine slag from the Aurora Fossil Museum. Can you tell what species this is? I don't see anything quite like it on the charts I've consulted. The other pic is from the same slag and is some kind of ray, I believe.
  25. sixgill pete

    Tyrannosauroidea indet.

    Dinosaur teeth from North Carolina are rare and have only been found in a handful of locations. Other than one well known location, these other sites are kept very close to the vest for obvious reasons. Most North Carolina collectors will never find one.I had originally I.D. this tooth as Dromaeosuarid. However after research and consultation with our resident expert Troodon this I.D. has been debunked. After additional pictures, especially of the base and serration it was determined to be a Tyrannosuroidea idet. The two known Tyrannosaurids from NC are Dryptosaurus and Appalachasaurus. Howeve
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