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  1. evelyntomology

    Some NJ Amber...

    Hey! It's been a while since I posted here. I recently went to check out the Crossman Clay Pit in Sayreville, NJ. The main entrance is gated off, along with having signs saying no entrance, but after some exploration, this seems to just be for the current construction site (which is also fenced off and should be respected)! There are some other areas fenced off for construction (mostly along Main Rd), but if you park at JFK then you can get in without trespassing. I don't know if there's any real rules (about digging and such) but I was able to find a couple good pieces around pre-dug holes left over from years past... and just on the surface! If anyone can recommend any specific guides (I've read a couple good ones) on polishing particularly small bits of amber, that would be greatly appreciated. I only got 4-5 pieces larger than my thumb, but most are around or smaller than 1/4" and I don't know if it's safe to use regular methods like wood chips in a rock tumbler for them. I'd hate to run them through only to find out I broke the only one with an insect inclusion. Speaking of, I didn't notice anything clear enough to have any bugs. the bigger pieces are way too cloudy to see into, as are most of the other pieces. I would recommend visiting and collecting some for yourselves, there's really an abundance. It's mostly smaller stuff, but it's cool regardless. It's only a matter of time before they cordon off the entire area and then we'll never be allowed to gather more. It's a shame something so historic isn't being protected whilst random land around it is. Evelyn
  2. Fullux

    Amber inclusion.

    Howdy all, Super excited about this piece of amber I just picked up! It's from the Bladen Formation of North Carolina and was found in the Neuse River. I consider myself lucky to have gotten it, as this location is very hard to get material from, at least from my experience. The reason I'm making this post is because the seller included pictures of a small plant inclusion inside the piece. I think it looks like a piece if moss, some fungus, or maybe a needle to a conifer, but I'm certainly not an expert on these particular fossils. Any of y'all know what it is?
  3. Fitch

    Insect in Amber

    From the album: Fossils I've Purchased

  4. Hi, new here to the forum want to say Hi and post up some images from my reason for joining. Thank you! My wife just picked up some Amber rings from a close dealer friend in Shanghai, the Amber all have insects my favorite a large mosquito and 8 or so predatory mites, the others different insects a moth maybe and possibly some type of ant. I did check one with a black light the others I have not bothered yet. The mosquito ring we paid around [price redacted as per forum rules] the others around [price redacted as per forum rules] this was wholesale best friend price, the larger Amber was something picked up a while back from someone else . The fossilized giant clam shell was from another friend of my wife’s in China. the Megladon tooth my grandfather gave me 60 years ago.
  5. Catshow7997

    Mushroom in mexican amber

    Hello! I'm Jonathan I want to present to you an incredible find. Years ago I bought this piece of amber which has a Hymenaea flower that can be seen at first glance, but when I saw it with a magnifying glass I realized that on the left it had another "Flower" I didn't want to sell it until I was sure what type of flower it was, then I saw that it looked more like a kind of mushroom in shape. Doing more research on my own I was surprised to see that it is a mushroom and probably of the psilocybin type, which is a hallucinogenic mushroom. The characteristics of the fungus are: The cap appears flat, with some closed lamellae, then we find a thin staff and the upper part of it, possibly veils with what is probably a mature fungus. At the bottom there is a , this is very close to the stem of the fungus but when zoomed in it is seen separated. The entire piece of amber has remains of plants with pieces of flowers with hairs as well as micro insects, the piece is clear and the inclusions such as the flower and the fungus can be seen without the help of a magnifying glass. The piece is amorphous and measures 4 centimeters long, the mushroom measures 1 centimeter from the cap to the tip of the cane. Then I will take it to a laboratory for a deep analysis. What did you think? PART_1717968268877 PART_1717968268627 PART_1717968268291
  6. Hello ! About 5 years ago I showed one specimen with an example of Diptera In Copula ( Mating "Flies" ) and today I have another to show, one of the better examples of copulation I have had in my "amber life". Beautiful Biting Midges - Ceratopogonidae in the last love dance of their lives. Baltic Amber from Poland. 35-54 million years old. Eocene. Enjoy your viewing ! Cheers from amber cave ! High quality picture --- > https://ibb.co/xCtF1K4
  7. I was not to show until there is a photo in the new atlas of inclusions but I have to brag. Extremely rare inclusion - a mushroom with a cap in Baltic amber Such a find is one in a million even for an amber searcher. Homobasidiomycetes possibly. What is very interesting, the stem of the mushroom is wrapped with some kind of hair and it is not a spider web. Baltic amber inclusion. 2mm, not big but extremely rare. It will be in the book called AmberArt II, already in first one book had some of my pictures and rare finds
  8. Hi, i wanted to see some opinions of what others think the outline protruding from the surface of this amber might be. this was found in Baja Mexico, the piece was actually found floating in the surf in northern baja, pacific ocean. it is for sure amber, and consistent with the type of cherry amber found in Chiapas Mexico. there are many inclusions in this piece, a couple of them ,tic, spider, are clear and preserved in enough detail to positively identify them beyond any doubt. The amber is not transparent obviously, but its translucent enough, that with strong light shined into it from one side you can look into it from the opposite side and see some of the inclusions in pretty good quality. I just wanted to hear the opinions from some in the group. When you look at the attached image, there is obviously something that can be seen outlined on the surface of the amber, i'm open to hear some of your views on what it could be? please open the image to get a better view, and disregard the printed words in yellow. thank you for your replies. cheers.
  9. ThePhysicist

    Planty claystone pebbles

    From the album: Hell Creek Formation Microsite

    Mudstone pebbles with unidentifiable plant matter. The leftmost chunk has an orange piece of amber visible.
  10. hi, this is looking into a chunk of amber from chiapas mexico, there are many inclusions seen from the opposite side, but they are all common insects, a tic a spider...ect, from this view i can clearly identify the millipede (arrow pointing to it in the center) but what is the species to the right with the arrow pointing to it and asking what it is. the black n white image shows the trace outline of the vertebra or skeletal bones running through it. i had a better image somewhere on my laptop, that showed the skeleton in much better detail. any idea what it could be? Thanks for your assistance. cheers
  11. Brevicollis

    Does amber count as fossil ?

    Hello, I just wanted to ask if amber counts as fossil. I saw a comment in a recent topic wich confused me a bit, so I wanted to ask. And I only mean Amber, only Amber, not Copal !
  12. Hi! Utter newbie here, nice to meet you. Hope I’m posting in the right place. I’d like better trained eyes than mine to tell me more about this piece, please. I’m familiar enough with sterling silver to believe the 925 hallmark but don’t know all that much about amber beyond a 15-minute google crash course! I found this at a tiny thrift shop in rural Maine a good decade ago and then forgot about it. It is mildly electrostatic and does fluoresce, strongly but unevenly, under UV light. Any tests to do with smelling are out of the question because my sense of smell has all but packed its bags and checked out thanks to covid. I’m most curious about the appearance of it under UV—does amber fluoresce unevenly like this? Those patches that don’t fluoresce fascinate me. Is that a dye? Heat treatment? Or is it just a pretty fake? That wouldn’t trouble me too much, honestly. This ring is more about the emotional value for me, all I am is extremely curious. Please excuse any formatting weirdness, I’ll try my best to fix any blunders. Whatever y’all can teach me about this ring, if anything, I’ll be really grateful. Thanks in advance!
  13. Hineroptera

    Some wasps in amber to ID

    Hello! I have a couple of wasps and was just wondering how specific an ID people may be able to provide. This one is in Baltic amber: And this one is in Dominican amber: Thanks for any info you can provide!
  14. Donna Truhan

    Baltic amber inclusion

    Looking through my Baltic amber chips under a microscope, I discovered what looks like a beetle?? The close-up pic you can see the fine hair on the antenna & below the head. I can make out the rear legs under the microscope, but can’t get a good picture.
  15. Barrelcactusaddict

    Sumatra Blue Amber (Sinamar Fm., ~30 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    4.3g dark, transparent blue amber from West Sumatra. This inclusion is most likely a winged ant of the Pseudomyrmex genus, although it may possibly be a wasp. A positive identification of both winged subjects is challenging, due to their deteriorated state and their position within the piece.

    © Kaegen Lau

  16. Barrelcactusaddict

    Sumatra Blue Amber (Sinamar Fm., ~30 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    4.3g dark, transparent blue amber from West Sumatra. This displays 3 of the 4 inclusions contained in the piece itself, each one a Pseudomyrmex sp. (the winged ants may possibly be wasps, but it is unlikely).

    © Kaegen Lau

  17. Barrelcactusaddict

    Sumatra Blue Amber (Sinamar Fm., ~30 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    4.3g dark, transparent blue amber from West Sumatra. The inclusion is that of a well-preserved Pseudomyrmex sp. of ant. There is very little documentation, written or photographic, of the flora and fauna inclusions in Indonesian amber, unfortunately.

    © Kaegen Lau

  18. Barrelcactusaddict

    Sumatra Blue Amber (Sinamar Fm., ~30 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    4.3g dark, transparent blue amber from West Sumatra. The inclusion is that of a slightly deteriorated specimen of Pseudomyrmex sp. of ant. There is very little documentation, written or photographic, of the flora and fauna inclusions in Indonesian amber, which makes me all the more excited to have discovered this piece!

    © Kaegen Lau

  19. Barrelcactusaddict

    Sumatra Blue Amber (Sinamar Fm., ~30 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    4.3g dark, transparent blue amber from West Sumatra. After grinding and polishing, I was surprised to discover that it contains 2 ants and 2 winged ants (possibly wasps); these were a little tricky to photograph, due to the amber's strong fluorescence under 140 lumen LED light, so these inclusions had to be backlit. I used a Canon EOS 500D, Canon 60mm f/2.8 Macro Lens, and combined 2x and 4x Hoya circular magnifier lenses (8x).

    © Kaegen Lau

  20. Barrelcactusaddict

    Sumatra Blue Amber (Sinamar Fm., ~30 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    4.3g dark, transparent blue amber from West Sumatra. Lateral view of the same Psudomyrmex inclusion in the previous entry. The antennae appear to have clubbed tips, but each is actually coated/overlain by a congealed drop of resin within the amber itself (this type of suspended resin formation is characteristic of and common in Indonesian amber).

    © Kaegen Lau

  21. Barrelcactusaddict

    Claiborne Amber (Cockfield Fm., 41.3-38 Ma)

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    8.0g prepared rough specimen displaying a partially polished face, measuring (mm) 50x22x14; this piece is a transverse section, and displays numerous layers or flow lines with sequences of micro bubbles as well as sediments. This material was recovered from the Malvern Clay Pits, east of Malvern, Arkansas. FTIR spectrum comparison of Claiborne amber to modern Shorea sp. resin points to the Dipterocarpaceae as a probable source for this middle Eocene-aged amber.

    © Kaegen Lau

  22. Barrelcactusaddict

    Rovno Amber (Obukhov Fm., Mezhigorje Fm. [37.71-28.1 Ma])

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Rovno Amber Rivne Region, Rivne Oblast, Ukraine Obukhov Fm., Mezhigorje Fm. (37.71-28.1 Ma) Weight: 115.0 g Dimensions: 10.0 x 7.2 x 3.3 cm Unfortunately, the market tends to label no distinction between Rovno and Baltic ambers, and while the two do share similarities in probable botanical source, physical and chemical properties, and age, Rovno amber differs in that: • The amber forests had a distinct and more southerly geographical origin, and formed in a warmer, more arid paleoenvironment. • Most deposits are believed to be autochthonous (i.e., have not been naturally redeposited/reworked over time). • Its known assemblage of arthropod inclusions differs slightly. Using SiC sandpaper, I worked from 240 (U.S. Standard Grit Size) to 3,000, and achieved a high polish with chromium oxide (ZAM compound) on a Selvyt microfiber cloth. Aside from shaping the piece with a Dremel tool in preparation for sanding, the entire process was performed manually and took about 5 hours to complete. Also shown is the amber's fluorescent response under 365 nanometer (long wave) UV light. Numerous bubbles (mostly two-phase "enhydros") and botanical detritus inclusions are densely scattered throughout the specimen, and there are no arthropod inclusions. *Note: Some of my photos from previous years describing Rovno amber have an incorrect age range listed; the several photos associated with this specimen show the correct data.

    © Kaegen Lau

  23. Barrelcactusaddict

    Rovno Amber (Obukhov Fm., Mezhigorje Fm. [37.71-28.1 Ma])

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Rovno Amber Rivne Region, Rivne Oblast, Ukraine Obukhov Fm., Mezhigorje Fm. (37.71-28.1 Ma) Weight: 115.0 g Dimensions: 10.0 x 7.2 x 3.3 cm Unfortunately, the market tends to label no distinction between Rovno and Baltic ambers, and while the two do share similarities in probable botanical source, physical and chemical properties, and age, Rovno amber differs in that: • The amber forests had a distinct and more southerly geographical origin, and formed in a warmer, more arid paleoenvironment. • Most deposits are believed to be autochthonous (i.e., have not been naturally redeposited/reworked over time). • Its known assemblage of arthropod inclusions differs slightly. Using SiC sandpaper, I worked from 240 (U.S. Standard Grit Size) to 3,000, and achieved a high polish with chromium oxide (ZAM compound) on a Selvyt microfiber cloth. Aside from shaping the piece with a Dremel tool in preparation for sanding, the entire process was performed manually and took about 5 hours to complete. Also shown is the amber's fluorescent response under 365 nanometer (long wave) UV light. Numerous bubbles (mostly two-phase "enhydros") and botanical detritus inclusions are densely scattered throughout the specimen, and there are no arthropod inclusions. *Note: Some of my photos from previous years describing Rovno amber have an incorrect age range listed; the several photos associated with this specimen show the correct data.

    © Kaegen Lau

  24. Barrelcactusaddict

    Rovno Amber (Obukhov Fm., Mezhigorje Fm. [37.71-28.1 Ma])

    From the album: Fossil Amber and Copal: Worldwide Localities

    Rovno Amber Rivne Region, Rivne Oblast, Ukraine Obukhov Fm., Mezhigorje Fm. (37.71-28.1 Ma) Weight: 127.7 g Dimensions: 10.4 x 7.6 x 3.5 cm Unfortunately, the market tends to label no distinction between Rovno and Baltic ambers, and while the two do share similarities in probable botanical source, physical and chemical properties, and age, Rovno amber differs in that: • The amber forests had a distinct and more southerly geographical origin, and formed in a warmer, more arid paleoenvironment. • Most deposits are believed to be autochthonous (i.e., have not been naturally redeposited/reworked over time). • Its known assemblage of arthropod inclusions differs slightly. Using SiC sandpaper, I worked from 240 (U.S. Standard Grit Size) to 3,000, and achieved a high polish with chromium oxide (ZAM compound) on a Selvyt microfiber cloth. Aside from shaping the piece with a Dremel tool in preparation for sanding, the entire process was performed manually and took about 5 hours to complete. Also shown is the amber's fluorescent response under 365 nanometer (long wave) UV light. Numerous bubbles (mostly two-phase "enhydros") and botanical detritus inclusions are densely scattered throughout the specimen, and there are no arthropod inclusions. *Note: Some of my photos from previous years describing Rovno amber have an incorrect age range listed; the several photos associated with this specimen show the correct data.

    © Kaegen Lau

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