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  1. It's been obvious to me over a decade that the holotype of the odontocete Phocodon scillae was first documented by Scilla (1670), making it the earliest fossil cetacean to be reported in the literature, and that the holotypes of the mysticetes Protororqualus cuvierii and "Balaena" cortesii were unearthed in the early 1800s, while the extinct mysticetes Adicetus vandelli, A. latus, and Cephalotropis nectus were unearthed in Portugal in 1831 about the same time that the basilosaurid Basilosaurus was unearthed in the antebellum South in the 1830s. Were there instances of extinct cetacean discoveries prior to the 1670 documentation of the Phocodon scillae holotype from Malta? Scilla, A., 1670. La vana speculazione disinganuata dal senso, Lettera risponsiva circa: Corpi Marini che Petrificata si trovano in varii luoghi terrestri, Napoli.
  2. Mioplosus_Lover24

    Holden Beach Diversity Of Fossils

    Recently got back from a trip on Holden Beach, and just WOW. Words can't describe the uniqueness of being able to find Mosasaur teeth next to Megalodon teeth. The recent Hurricane brought in many new fossils and I had quite good luck. Here are some photos of the trip, I will post a picture showing all of my best finds shortly, but for now enjoy! First, here are some of the Squalicorax pristodontus teeth I collected. These were relatively common.
  3. I’m making a trip down the coastline of North and South Carolina; from Topsail Beach to Charleston. I know there sites in Charleston for basilosaurus fossils, but I’m curious if anyone knew hidden gems of the Carolina coastline
  4. Daniel1990

    Basilosaurus tooth ?

    Hi I bought this tooth once. Is it a basilosaurus tooth? As far as I remember, it comes from Morocco. Thank you in advance for your help. Best wishes Daniel
  5. A whirlwind week... I was visiting my daughter for father's day weekend. On Thursday, the Museum of Natural History, Lincoln Memorial, the Vietnam black wall. Lots of excitement and I was truly wasted by the time we got back to Union Station. There is so much to see... hours does not make a dent.... Everyone would take different photos... I took these in the initial Galleries... Lamarck's Carinaria... New fauna... This is a model, many exhibits are the real thing.... Looking to the ceilings...A Right Whale and a Basilosaurus Lots of Crinoids.... I had thought that @minnbuckeye had captured a few of these, but maybe not.... On _ward and up ward , more galleries to visit Although really small in size, I was impressed by an impression on the rock.. This Smilodon fatalis also got my attention, How about the "sheath" over each claw.... Does any TFF member have one of those ? Between Galleries, you see some transitional modern items.. There are complete floors dedicated to modern mammals... Never got there... but what do we have here? And once again, on to other floors , other galleries.... x A Stingray from Lebanon, capturing an image from the Cretaceous. A Flightless Bird.. I guess related to Titanis walleri, another revelation for me Marine Mammal Definitely large tusks and then Unitatherium.... look at those sabers.... Fantastic time.. learned lots of new things just walking around, taking photos.. If you love fossils, definitely a bucket list item.. I figure I saw about 4% of the exhibits available... and in the last transition space.....60 foot model I'll share one other experience.. I visited the Baltimore Aquarium and stopped by Faidley's seafood market and purchased Chesapeake Bay Oysters for $2 each.. I love seafood, and my daughter , Crystal, has excellent culinary skills... Mackerel, Cod, Salmon, Shrimp, Crawfish, Abalone, but the absolute best were the Oysters Rockerfeller... Raw, Drago, Rockereller Bon appetit....Crystal saved the shells of both oyster and abalone
  6. kirkjeremiah23

    Basilosaurus bone block

    Figured I would share my recent project, a Basilosarus bone block found by myself in AL. Got alot of work to do and wish the jaw section had complete teeth, but who knows whats else lies in the matrix. Some pretty cool crystals throughout. Let me know your thoughts
  7. kirkjeremiah23

    Unknown jaw

    Found this jaw in southern Alabama with some suspected Basilosarus material, but cant seem to find any teeth that match, any ideas?? Tje jaw bone is approx 3 inches in length. I appreciate the help
  8. kirkjeremiah23

    Basilosaurus

    Found some suspected Basilosaurus material today. Buudy found a large vert. I found this partial rib bone. Cant complain!!
  9. Still_human

    Basilosaurus jaw?

    Is it just me, or does this look like there’s a good chance that it’s either totally separate pieces with significant restoration connecting it, or even just quite a bit of fake areas? I feel like especially from the right side, it appears to be a huge amount of just matrix visible, and even on the left side a good deal of area that’s just matrix. I know that matrix isn’t unusual on pieces, and I wouldn’t mind small amounts of restoration/places of matrix filing in missing areas, but not large portions of something.
  10. I found what are claimed to be Basilosaurus jaws online, and I can't decide whether they're authentic. They definitely have real material, but I have a suspicion that they might be composites. I should also note that they are suspiciously cheap [price redacted]. First one is 15.7 inches: Second one is 24.4 inches:
  11. hi one cool video from stenberg museum about evolution of whales. enjoy
  12. Jhwalkerjr

    Help

    Hi my son found this in some limestone near St Stevens Alabama we were wondering if someone could possibly help with the ID I know that it isn't complete but that is all that we could find of it thank you for any help
  13. Ferocious 'Ocucaje Predator' was a sea serpent-like mammal with knives for teeth Brandon Specktor, Live Science, March 19, 2022 In Peru, skull of ‘marine monster’ points to fearsome ancient predator Scientists think the ancient mammal was a Basilosaurus, part of the aquatic cetacean family, whose contemporary descendents include whales, dolphins and porpoises. Reuter, ABC News, March 18, 2022 Yours, Paul H.
  14. hemipristis

    Basilosaurus or Pakicetus?

    Greetings! I spotted this pair of Moroccan cetacean teeth for sale online. They are both labelled as being "Basilosaurus", which is likely the case for the thinner incisor , but I'm not so sure about the other, darker tooth. I'm thinking possibly Pakicetus due to the shape of the crown and the dual root. Probably a "cheek tooth" Thoughts? As for quality, the incisor looks probably frankensteined, Thoughts? Thanks for any assistance!
  15. I not too long ago bought this piece. The seller told me it was an authentic Juvenile Basilosaurus jaw. But I am a bit worried it's not real since a lot of jaw parts can be casted or faked. Can anybody help me? Size is about 15CM
  16. Fossil "D"

    Basilosaurid jaw section ID help

    Was looking for ID or any information on this Basilasouridae jaw section. It's a little over 7.5" long. It was found in the Samlat formation, Dakhla, Western Sahara. Thanks in advance!
  17. Still_human

    Basilosaur lower frontal jaw section

    From the album: Marine reptiles and mammals

    Basilosaur(us?) frontal lower jaw seyction, from Boujdour, in Morocco. Hopefully the species can be distinguished with some more info
  18. Still_human

    Basilosaur frontal lower jaw section

    From the album: Marine reptiles and mammals

    Almost the entire frontal canine portion of the lower jaw of a Basilosaur. As you can see, the area where the absent front canines were, at the tip of the piece is visible, as well as where the missing last canines were situated. Although it was labeled as a Basilosaurus, I’m a little hesitant to consider that the case until I can personally corroborate the information. Apparently from Boujdour, I’m just having trouble finding information about which whales are, or are not found there, so until then I’ll leave it more open with just Basilosaur.
  19. Still_human

    Basilosaurus rear jaw with molars

    From the album: Marine reptiles and mammals

    About 8" side to side *info to be added
  20. I watched a show on PBS last night, "When Whales Walked: Journeys in Deep Time." I just happened to notice it on the guide about 45 minutes before it was on. It is actually about more than the evolution of whales, the group having four-footed Early Eocene ancestors. There is a long segment roughly twenty minutes long each on crocodilians, birds, whales, and elephants. I thought it was a good show overall with interviews of researchers I know from their technical articles ( Hans-Dieter Sues, Philip Gingerich, Emmanel Gheerbrant, Christian de Muizon). However, each segment was also a little light on content for the topic and one was especially unclear. The one on birds made it appear that Deinonychus was an ancestor of later birds. They should have showed a chart showing when it lived in the Cretaceous with Archaeopteryx and the Liaoning birds millions of years before. There was a quick view of a family tree that seemed to illustrate that but it went by in a second or two. The segment on whales showed a lot of footage of modern whales and some great background on the "first whale," Pakicetus, but it didn't show any of the whales described in the past twenty years. It just mentioned that there had been recent discoveries. I thought there should have been at least a quick look at Ambulocetus and a few of the increasingly more marine-adapted forms that lived before Basilosaurus. They pretty much jumped from Pakicetus to Basilosaurus to the divergence of toothed and baleen whales. I think they could have spent the two hours just on the whales just as the title of the show led me to believe. I liked the segment on elephants because just as I was expecting the show to skip the earliest known members of the group, they go to Morocco and then talk to Emmanuel Gheerbrant who described Phosphatherium, the first probiscidean, which is known from the same early Eocene phosphate layer as a lot of the shark teeth we see at shows are from. Other extinct forms were descussed as well. Here's a link that takes to an online notice and website: https://www.pbs.org/show/when-whales-walked-journeys-deep-time/ Jess
  21. Hi! I made a small visit to the Natural History Museum in Maastricht today to visit the new small exhibition named "Whale: Locality Maastricht" which centers around some Eocene whale bones from an undescribed whale found in the ENCI quarry in Maastricht. The exhibition explores further into the evolution of whales, it's a small exhibition but worth a visit if you haven't seen the museum or if you are really interested in whale evolution. Should any of our Dutch, Belgian & German members decide to visit (or international members who are in the area), then you should really grab a copy of the exhibition book. It is really cool and informative, it's only €2,50 but 125 pages long (both in dutch & english) and it covers the evolution of whales, the ENCI whale, modern whales & their biology and about whaling and whales in human history & myth. The exhibition book alone is well worth the visit in my opinion, I kinda compare it with the EOS magazine about Iguanodons & the book "Mammoths: ice age giants by Adrian Lister" but then about whales. So here are the photo's I made of the exhibition. The Exhibition Room: left: Metepocetus sp. neurocranium with preserved ear bones from Liessel in the Netherlands (Miocene) Right: Isoluted vertebrae of various whale species from Liessel in the Netherlands (Miocene) Isolated vertebrae of Eocene primordial whales (Archaeoceti) dredged from the buttom of the North Sea, for comparison with those of the "ENCI whale" Isolated vertebrae of Eocene primordial whales (Archaeoceti) dredged from the buttom of the North Sea, for comparison with those of the "ENCI whale" Smallest jaw: possibly Dorudon sp. from the late Eocene of Ad Dakhla in Morocco. Bigger jaw: possibly Pappocetus lugardi, from the middle Eocene of Ben Gueran in Morocco.
  22. Hi. I’d appreciate some opinions on this Basilosaurus tooth? It’s a beautiful specimen but something feels off. I know it’s repaired. This is currently for sale in Edmonton Alberta. Annual show. I’ve obscured the prices as per forum rules? @Troodon@Boesse@Tidgy's Dad@Andy
  23. Hi everyone, Im looking at a bunch of stuff that someone got from the big fossil expo this month, but I want to be sure of what is what before I do anything. There's a few things way beyond what I could potentially get, but I'm just curious about in general. These are all Moroccan, and most, if not all, are Kem Kem. are these first 4 pics spinosaur? With the teeth I know the 2 on the top&left are probably carchar teeth, but I'm wondering about the other 2. In the 2nd picture, I'm guessing the right one is a spinosaur vert, right? What about the other one? I'm sure it would probably be very hard to tell with just a single rib, but could the rib be spinosaurus? It seems to match some museum spino skeleton ribs, but that's the best I can figure out:/
  24. I purchased a unsightly Franken-Basilosaurus tooth a few weeks ago for pretty cheap. Seeing as though i don't have $400-700+ to spend on a nice basilosaurus tooth i saw potential and a fun project in this cheap ugly duckling. Yes, it's Moroccan. It came with the typical glue/sand mix covering it, filling all cracks, voids and roughing out transitions of deceptive franken composites. How it came: Ok, first things first. Clean it. I used acetone, a razor, a needle, a tooth brush and my engraver. Hours of delicate work later i finally see what i'm working with. After cleaning: Yeesh, this might be more work than i thought...... And someone composited a incisor or canine tooth tip on the top of my premolar!! Bwahahaha!! Ok, composites need to go. Bye, bye Next i noticed this was not lined up correctly when it was glued back together. So i grab my trusty dremel tool and proceed to carefully saw this baby in half. Then i removed most of the epoxy/sand glue from each side. Continued.........
  25. Still_human

    Largest basilosaurus tooth

    Does anyone know how large basilosaurus canines can get? I don't know if they're all technically canine teeth, but I'm referring to the 4 to 5 single-point front teeth. Crown & root together.
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