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Found 17 results

  1. I found this water filled agate geode/vug in an area known for 22-26 million year old coral and shell fossils. I acid etched it from a chunk of limestone. It has unique patterns I have not seen before. It might not be a coral fossil, but that is my best guess. It could be a Bryzoan which have also been found in the area. It's 1.5 inches long. I'm hoping the detailed patterns and side structure can help one of your experts figure out what I found. The outer form also makes me think of coral, but brozoans would also fit.
  2. I am on a mission to determine if I have different types of fossils in the bottom of our creek bed than I do in the rocks in our yard. This is the first rock I have photographed and I saw a bryozoan fossil I didn't recognize! At least I think it is bryozoan... I have learned not to make assumptions... I recognize the fossils on the right of the photo as fenestellate bryozoans. The portion on the left is what I am not sure about - the honeycomb like part. It has some of the characteristics that I am used to finding in the fenestellate bryozoan fossil rocks, but it also reminds me of the trepos
  3. Today on a hunt in the lower devonian of new york, I found on of the most unusual piece and I can't decide if its bryzoan or possible placoderm.
  4. Folks, These photos are from a small section of shale I picked up in Northeastern Oklahoma. The shale contains marine fossils of Pennsylvanian age. I have questions about a couple of the labeled objects. I’m thinking the center one may be a brachiopod (or possibly a bryzoan--it's hard to tell because of the crinoid plate resting above it). The one on the right looks to me like a bryzoan. However, I’m a novice at identification so I’d appreciate any opinions. The putative bryzoan appears to have grown on the crinoid stem. Best wishes.
  5. I keep finding rocks with these bowl-like structures on them, so I took one to examine more closely. I cleaned it well with my vinegar/water solution and then started removing as much soft matrix as I could with a dental pick. These bowl like structures have a fairly thick edge to them. Once I took macro photos of them, I could see that they do seem to be comprised of fenestellan bryzoan fossils, although I believe I do see some crinoids, too (not sure if I included those in the photos). I have been learning about the fenestellan bryzoan anatomy, but I am not sure where/if this fits in. I
  6. I am trying to wrap my head around what these things looked like in "real life" so I can recognize them better. This is a limestone rock with what I think are fenestella bryozoan fossils, found in Huntsville, AL. Mississipian age. This photo is looking down at what I call the "top" of the rock. The next photo will be from the side, looking at the same area but from the "inside" of the rock. Can anyone point me to a site where I might find a diagram of these to better help me understand what they looked like? Thanks! Ramona
  7. This is my first post in the Fossil ID section - I am SO excited to find this resource! A have found a few very helpful folks in other places, but this group is a huge wealth of information! A bit of background - we moved into a house just outside of the city limits of Huntsville, AL, a couple of months ago. After finding a couple of fossils laying around in the yard, I decided to investigate the wooded area at the back of our property a bit more. Whoa!!! There is a creek bed on the property and the closer you walk to the creek the more rocks you have to walk over. Every single rock I pi
  8. On my recent trip north, I was fortunate to be able to stop in Wax, Kentucky to look for blastoids. It was very hot and I had only about an hour to look. I didn't find any. But found some other fossils that I am happy to have. All that is left of one brachiapod is barely an outline...looking somewhat like a ponderosa and about the same size. Sorry, I didn't get a scale into any of these. But the nicest part of that fossil are the very typical beekites...sodalite pseudomorphs, I think they are called. They flouresce under black light and are classics. The little oval fossil looks to me all the
  9. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Archimedes with fronds, in Matrix SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation, northern Alabama. TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 350,000,000 yrs old) Data: The Archimedes is also termed moss animal, the Bryozoans are colonial animals that live as filter feeders, filtering nutrition from food through it's fenestrae, a screen-like structure that went around the axis of its screw-like central structure seen here. The Bryzoan Archimedes is named after its resemblance to Archimedes’ screw, a device invented by the
  10. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Archimedes with fronds, in Matrix SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation, northern Alabama. TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 350,000,000 yrs old) Data: The Archimedes is also termed moss animal, the Bryozoans are colonial animals that live as filter feeders, filtering nutrition from food through it's fenestrae, a screen-like structure that went around the axis of its screw-like central structure seen here. The Bryzoan Archimedes is named after its resemblance to Archimedes’ screw, a device invented by the
  11. Dpaul7

    Graveyard fossil side a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Graveyard Fossil - with Trilobite Appendage SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) A "Graveyard" style fossil; many animals here. Both sides of the specimen show bryzoan remnants, some crinoid, Mollusk and Bryzoan remnants.
  12. Dpaul7

    Graveyard fossil side a.jpg

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Graveyard Fossil - with Trilobite Appendage SITE LOCATION: Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama TIME PERIOD: Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) A "Graveyard" style fossil; many animals here. Both sides of the specimen show bryzoan remnants, some crinoid, Mollusk and Bryzoan remnants.
  13. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Polypora spinulifera Bryzoan fossil Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Bryozoa (also known as the Polyzoa, Ectoprocta or commonly as moss animals), are a phylum of aquatic invertebrate animals. Typically about 0.5 millimetres (0.020 in) long, they are filter feeders that sieve food particles out of the water using a retractable lophophore, a "crown" of tentacles lined with cilia. Most marine species live in tropical waters, but a few occur in oceanic trenches, and others are found in polar waters. O
  14. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Polypora spinulifera Bryzoan fossil Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Bryozoa (also known as the Polyzoa, Ectoprocta or commonly as moss animals), are a phylum of aquatic invertebrate animals. Typically about 0.5 millimetres (0.020 in) long, they are filter feeders that sieve food particles out of the water using a retractable lophophore, a "crown" of tentacles lined with cilia. Most marine species live in tropical waters, but a few occur in oceanic trenches, and others are found in polar waters. O
  15. From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bryzoan - Archimedes screw wrapped in Fronds Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been extinct since the Permian. Archimedes i
  16. Dpaul7

    Bryzoan, Large Archimedes.JPG

    From the album: MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Large Archimedes Bryzoan in matrix Bangor Limestone Formation, North Alabama, USA Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been extinct since the Permian. Archimedes is a genus of fenestrate bryozoans
  17. Looking for ID for the 3 different bryzoan specimens labeled 1, 2, and 3 as well as these ultra cool little oyster clumps. Location = Hampton VA USA There is an offshore fossil bed that these wash out of after storms down on a private beach I have access to. Miocene I assume, somewhere around the St.Mry's fmn. Also coming out of this bed are the less frequent poorly barnacle-encrusted chesapectan and the very very infrequent ecphora. I've found very infrequent fossil horse teeth 1/4 away so there is a lot going on fmn wise... I collect these when I'm local aft
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