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  1. marguy

    rudists to see

    Hello, my wife and I went to Charente to meet uncles and aunts that we had not seen for several years. A few kilometers from their home, walls and old houses in a hamlet are built with recycled materials: rudist fossils !!! here are some photos (on the first, it was not the cars that threw the fossils ) We walked through the surrounding countryside but the vegetation covers the ground, and only a corn field and a walnut plantation left some bare land where we found mostly broken pieces, but in the end a nice coral and 2 decent rudists for our pleasure. Enjoy. (I thi
  2. Hello, several weeks ago, I presented a rudist recovery "operation" from the Afling-formation of the Gosau-group of Kainach (Upper Cretaceous): Well, the same day I have discovered the rudist zone featured above, I have also discovered a rudist zone about 100-200 m stratigraphically deeper. It is confined to an about 1 m thick, very dark limestone bed rich in various rudist and echinoid remains. The limestone belongs to the Geistthal-formation, considering the limestone is still located within the sequence with some red clastic rocks, suggesting strong terrestrial influence i
  3. Kikokuryu

    Dromaeosaurus albertensis Tooth

    This is my first attempt at getting a Dromeosaurus albertensis tooth from Judith River fm. I've largely been avoiding buying dromeosaurids like the plague that aren't Acheroraptor or Saurornitholestes. Provenance: Hill County, Montana The tooth is repaired, and I had to realigned it while restabilizing it with butvar. The tooth doesn't seem to perfectly fit together, or too much butvar ended up in-between. There does not appear to be any serrations on the mesial edge, and it doesn't appear to have any trace of serrations, at least not that I can see with a macroscope.
  4. Hello! Having discovered some new rudist occurrences in the lower part of the upper Santonian - lower Campanian clastic-marine Afling-formation at Römaskogel hill near Kainach, western Styria, Austria, about 6 weeks ago. Here I would like to present a very specific visit to one of these sites at 05/15/2021. It was aimed to recover some more parts of already known rudists from the outcrop at site #30. Here we go! Approaching Römaskogel, the hill in the middle. Its 1006 m high, the snowy mountain in the background is the Gleinalpe mountain, nearly 2000 m high:
  5. A new super cool ootaxon of eggs and very different that what we are familiar with is presented in this paper : Stillatuberoolithus storrsi from the Kaiparowits Fm of Utah. Eggs are tiny at around 18mm and " the exact identity of the egg producer is unknown, the eggshell microstructure and small size is consistent with a small-bodied avian or non-avian theropod" Paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-89472-1#disqus_thread @-Andy- @HamptonsDoc
  6. Tlatolophus galorum, gen. et sp. nov., a parasaurolophini dinosaur from the upper Campanian of the Cerro del Pueblo Formation, Coahuila, northern Mexico. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195667121001312 Abstract
  7. Crankyjob21

    F744B84E-7893-429D-BB58-720365BCFFDE

    From the album: Cranky’s album of fossils

    A vertebra from the massive bony fish xiphactinus from the Niobara chalk formation
  8. I recently purchased this vertebrae which was sold as a mosasaur (Clidastes) vertebrae. I wasn't convinced that the vert was Mosasaur (or even marine reptile for that matter) in origin when I bought it, I simply bought it because I thought it was a nice looking vertebrae. But now I thought I might give it a shot to try and get an ID on this thing. It was found in the Gober Chalk, Austin Group, Gober, Fannin County, Texas, USA and dates back to the Campanian, Cretaceous (± 80 mya). I don't really know what the vertebrae could be honestly, I don't believe it to be Mosasaur in origin o
  9. Last January 12, I found some Exogyra sp. oysters in a limestone Late Campanian / Early Maastrichtian strata (SE Pyrenees, Catalonia, Spain), who turned to show abundant beekite rings. I owe to @abyssunder my knowledge of this mineral phenomenon, which, in my area,occurs mainly over laminar-type shells like oysters' (It can occur on other fossils, though). Have you fossils with beekite rings ?
  10. Saturday, 02/06/2021 St. Bartholomä-Formation (Campanian), Styria, Austria - mainly rudists of the hippuritid and radiolitid family. This was my first fossil trip since more then 3 months due to too much Covid first and too much snow lately. But now snow has melted, at least in St. Bartholomä. Note: Austria is still in so-called "hard lockdown", but you can drive around like crazy in our country, as long as you stay in your car overnight . I did not, I am doing only day trips, and St. Bartholomä is only a 30 km drive. - First I visited two low-productive sites, check
  11. Kurczak

    Hair?

    Hi Is this hair , feather or algae fossil? Age : Campanian Location : Southern Poland
  12. PaleoNoel

    Aguja Multituberculate Mammal Tooth

    Right now you'll be seeing a lot more posts from me as I'm making a concerted effort to get some of my fossils ID'd which I've been slacking on for a couple months (between, college, work et.). Anyway, here's a cool little tooth I found searching through some Texan Aguja formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian) matrix I got from PaleoTex. It was found with its roots still attached but unfortunately they've since broken off, however I've kept them in the same container so I don't lose track of them when I eventually try to reattach them. I'm confident it's a mammal tooth, and I think it's from a
  13. The Amateur Paleontologist

    Late Cretaceous chalk in North America

    Hey everyone I know I've been lately rather inactive on TFF; I was held back by fieldwork and other reasons (though do expect some posts about the fieldwork next weekend ). But anyway, onto what I came to talk about... Would anyone know of some good exposures of Late Cretaceous chalk in Canada or USA? I'm thinking specifically about Campanian chalk or, even better, Maastrichtian chalk.. It would be great if the exposed chalk is very fossiliferous, of course. Thanks for any help! -Christian
  14. Upper Campanian foraminifera from Northern Germany. We found in the quarry of Laegerdorf near Hamburg. We think it is a Lituola. What's your opinion ? It is agglutinated and the specimens have such areal, multiple openings. See more of our finds at https://foraminifera.eu/loc.php?locality=Laegerdorf+Neue+Heidestrasse
  15. From the album: Vertebrates (other than fish)

    Dinosaur egg shell pieces. Parentage: Perhaps Struthiosaurus Campanian Found at Beaureceuil, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France Thanks to Pixpaleosky
  16. Norki

    Small theropod claw

    Hello, This is probably a long shot, especially because the ends are broken off, but I was wondering if someone could have a go at IDing this very small theropod claw from the Dinosaur Park Formation. I figured that the relative thickness above and below the blood groove might be diagnostic, but I know how hard these can be to ID at the best of times. After consulting this thread, my best guess so far is that it comes from a troodontid, but I'm skeptical about this simply because of how rare they are. Thanks!
  17. sander

    Pseudocorax topic

    This topic is a short continuation of my previous topic on my Squalicorax collection, which can be seen here: This time I have chosen to show my Pseudocorax teeth. As with the Squalicorax teeth, I am open for trades and buying new additions. The oldest examples of Pseudocorax in my collection come from the Lower Campanian. Like the Squalicorax genus, they start off as a genus with very small teeth. Pseudocorax granti (x16) Ozan Formation Lower Campanian Moss Creek, Fannin County, Texas, United States of America See you guy t
  18. Hello forum members! With the new Coronavirus raging across the world, I thought it would be nice to start some kind of advent calendar, using my own Squalicorax collection. Everyday I will post one or multiple Squalicorax teeth from one location. Let's see what ends sooner, my collection or the virus outbreak. I will start with the oldest tooth from the Albian substage and end with the teeth from the uppermost substage; the Maastrichtian. The first one is the oldest and also one of the smallest teeth in my collection. Unfortunately it is so sma
  19. dinosaur man

    My Tyrannosaur research

    Hi I decided to make a post about my main research project right now on Campanian Tyrannosaurs specifically Daspletosaurus. Today I have found something to tell teeth from the Judith River Formation and Dinosaur Park Formation. This could also do with the Tyrannosaurs prey or locality. I found out that Judith River Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations are more circular and more round compared to the same time Dinosaur Park Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations. The Dinosaur Park Formation Tyrannosaur teeth serrations are more longer skinner and more chiseled like but not like other Tyrannos
  20. Hello all, I recently found this strange fossil within a sandstone concretion from the late Campanian marine Bearpaw formation. I'm very familiar with the typical ammonites and other molluscs of the formation, and haven't seen anything like this - is it some sort of nautiloid, or something else entirely? Thanks.
  21. According to a new study, what was once thought to be one species Deinosuchus hatcheri may have been as many as 3 species. This new study is linked in the attached article which is a good read Deinosuchus hatcheri Deinosuchus riograndensis Deinosuchus schwimmeri https://www.hakaimagazine.com/news/when-deinosuchus-ruled-the-earth/
  22. Could not resist collecting some more Trochactaeon snails at Breitenbach-11 in Kainach, Styria, Austria last Saturday (10/10/2020). Especially the upper T-bed contains rather well preserved (for the formation, of course ) snails. But always the right amount of weathering is needed (not too much, leads to disintegration of snails; not to less, they will adhere firmly to the rock). Still some potential there. Worked only with a screwdriver, needed only a few very gentle hammer taps. No prepping, just a short brush with a soft tooth brush. For more info about the area, have a look at my
  23. Fossil snails of the genus Trochactaeon from Kainach near Voitsberg, Styria, Austria (Gosau-Group of Kainach, upper Cretaceous) - Summary of this years prospection Introduction Snails of the extinct genus Trochactaeon (formerly part of the genus Actaeonella) are among the most familiar fossils of the upper Cretaceous Gosau-Group of the Austrian Alps. The rather large size of some species (>10 cm), their intriguing spiral pattern in transverse sections and plenty supply, based on many mass occurrence, make them particularly popular. Some well known occurrences in Austria, di
  24. I was recently reorganizing my fossil collection and thought I would share some pieces I collected during Paleontology field trips in undergrad at Alabama. I'm glad I took thorough notes at the time! The demopolis chalk is a popular formation for finding Exogyra/ostrea/pycnodonte shells and shark teeth. We visited a site in Tupelo, MS many times for surface collecting. Some of the cool pieces I found were many fragments of a mosasaur jaw (top pic, top 2 slots), a Squalicorax kaupi tooth, a scyliorhinus(?) tooth, bony fish vertebrae, and bony fish teeth. I was told the dark fossils
  25. Hello! I have collected quite many specimens with Trochactaeon snails from April to May 2020. They all come from the Upper Santonian to Lower Campanian upper Geistthal-formation or Lower Afling-formation of the Gosau of Kainach in western Styria. Some of the specimens contain abundant black, wavy, "folded", shell fragments. They seem to grow on the Trochactaeon snails in some places. They resemble small oysters in some ways. Unfortunately, I have not found anything conclusive about their identity. I found a pic in a paper of Kollmann (2014), with some somewhat similar, unidentified b
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