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  1. From the album: Echinoderm Collection

    Pleurocystites squamosus (Parseley, 1982 (?)) with partial Isorophusella incondita (Raymond, 1915 ) attached to the cystoid. Upper Bobcaygeon Formation, Middle Ordovician. Simcoe County, Ontario, Canada. Plate is 11cm long.
  2. Hi guys I decided to rescue and acquire a new unlabelled specimen. It appears to be a rugose solitary coral that can possibly come from the Devonian of south western Ontario. Can anyone give me any leads on the species level??
  3. Hi guys so today I came across a new shop that popped up in downtown Hamilton, Ontario. Anyway long story short I bought what appears to be Silurian coral fossil that originated somewhere on the Niagara Escarpment in Ontario or the State of New York. This fossil came from a peculiar museum that liquidated its collections in Niagara of Ontario and closed but the fossil didnt come with a label. Can anyone help me pin down what it is? I have never encountered a fossil like this on the Niagara Escarpment of Hamilton, Ontario. Also this was being sold along with o
  4. fumanchuck

    Strange textured rock

    Hi All, First post for me. Excited to participate! I have recently taken up fossil hunting in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada's river valley creek beds. I have found several fossilized bone fragments, petrified wood fragments and even a few first nations artifacts. All of these have been found on small creek bed shelves during low water. The geological time period is mesozoic. The first object I would appreciate any feedback on is an irregularly textured flat rock or potentially a fossil of some kind. It was found loose on the surface next to the water. It has an
  5. Avrahamagirl

    Is this Coprolite?

    Can anyone identify this? I think it might be coprolite.
  6. So I decided that I would finally make a point of documenting some of these back country field excursions, and made a Youtube channel to keep the videos all in one place. Here's a a rather ordinary extraction of a placenticeras ammonite found the day before we did a little field work with some paleontologists. The GoPro is a fun addition to my kit, and makes it a lot easier to document the actual process of finding and extracting these things in the field. Anyway, I'll let the video speak for itself - enjoy! (click the image to open video link)
  7. Backcountryhiker

    Cretaceous Jaw Fragment? Please Help ID

    Found this fossil while surface collecting in the Alberta Badlands (Canada) North Of Drumheller in the Red Deer river valley. Looking for some help to ID this unusual looking fossil. If I had to guess I'd say it looks like a possible jaw fragment? Any help to ID would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.
  8. oilshale

    Albertonia cupidinia (Lambe, 1916)

    Presumably a slow swimming grazer-detritivore. Alternative combination: Elonichthys cupidineus Lambe, 1916. Taxonomy according to fossilworks.org. Diagnosis for Albertonia according to Schaeffer and Mangus, 1976, pp. 545-548: "A parasemionotid (as defined by Patterson, 1973, pp. 262, 287) specialized in having deeply fusiform body and greatly elongated pectoral fins. Small acuminate marginal teeth present on mobile maxilla and dentary. Suspensorium nearly vertical. Preopercular present; opercular and subopercular subequal. Longest pectoral fm rays about one-half length of body.
  9. Rolando O

    Fossil found in Alberta, Canada

    I found this fossil while hiking up a mountain in Kananaskis, Alberta a few weeks ago. Any info will be appreciated.
  10. amaanthawer

    Toronto (Upper Ordovician) Fossil ID

    Hey everyone! I found my first fossil last weekend in a creek near the Don River in midtown Toronto. From my knowledge reading through this forum, it seems to be packed with crinoid stem fossils. I’d really appreciate a confirmation, to learn more about the age of the fossil and maybe even the species.
  11. Gilby

    Freshwater Fossil

    Found this fossil loose on a limestone shoreline on St. Joseph Island located at the north end of Lake Huron in Ontario, Canada. I am a civil engineer and have some experience with rocks but I’m fairly new to fossils. Any help identifying would be great!
  12. hemipristis

    Pleistocene Mammal Jaw, ID requested

    hello everyone, I saw this on our favorite website. It is a mammal jaw dredged up off of Newfoundland, Canada. It is likely Pleistocene in age. The piece is approximately 12 cm in length. It is clearly an herbivore, but doesn't look like bison, horse, camel, tapir or deer to me; however, I am still learning to ID my Pleistocene mammals. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
  13. During one of my hikes exploring the badlands in Central Alberta Canada (Scollard formation) near the Red Deer river I found this strange flat & thin piece of what appears to be fossilized bone. As you can see from the pictures it fans outward and it's quite thin, to me it almost looks similar to a aquatic flipper although I obviously am not sure at all what this could be. My instinct wants to say turtle piece possibly? Any help to ID this cool fossil would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance!
  14. Hello everyone, while I was getting some exercise exploring the badlands here in central Alberta (Red Deer river valley Scollard formation I believe) I found a piece of fossilized bone that must have been recently exposed due to spring thaw. I am no guru however it appears to have some predation marks on it (third picture left side) & to me looks like it could be a leg bone? I'm looking for some help confirm these are in fact predation marks & also to ID the bone itself if possible. I know its difficult due to it being just a small fragment but any help or additional info would be gr
  15. I have been collecting fossils for many years, but this fossil is without a doubt the strangest and most mysterious of the fossils I’ve ever found- I would really appreciate your help in helping solve this mystery of what it is and how old it is! It was found on the rocky shores of Lake Huron in Southampton, Ontario. I initially was interested in it because it looked like a boot and I thought it was a native carving, but realized it must be a fossil of something I’ve never seen before. It’s very interesting to me because it almost seems to be coiled like a spine of an animal, but could also be
  16. Dimitar

    Jellyfish strobila fossil

    Hi guys! Please assist to identify if this is a Jellyfish strobila fossil . I was expecting it to be a plant, but the shape of the disks is so different. N.1 N.2 N.3 N.4
  17. Dimitar

    Tribrachidium - Precambrian

    Hello again guys. Today I walked again on my places, and I payed more attention ot pre-ordovician layer.. Ordovician - as we can see it - it is full of life. But just 1-2 layers below , there is almost nothing. Except Tribrachidium . This seems to be the main finding that I have, the rest is pretty much mud and nothing else. So Tribrachidium: this look like snail , the snail without andy shell.. And it has 3 brachidiums - 3 internal structures that seems to be symetrical between each other. N.1
  18. snolly50

    Ammolite Jumble

    Here is an aggregation of rough ammolite. It rests on the vanity of the guest suite's bath in Palatial snolly Manor. The chunks were obtained from a Canadian jewelry producer, specializing in ammolite items. My hypothesis is that the ammolite layer on these pieces was judged too thin or fractured to warrant cutting as stones for jewelry. The ammolite remains backed by thick ironstone and the pieces have been heavily consolidated. Given the varied angles of their faces, they make an ever shifting display as one moves about the room.
  19. Hello everyone, first time poster here. While enjoying a day hike through the badlands of central Alberta near the Red Deer river (North of Drumheller) my girlfriend & I came across multiple oval shaped fossils (I hope) that look quite unusual. As you can see all of them are very similar in shape & size. They all seem to have what appear to be two lobes on each side & crease down the center. The one on the far right is quite shiny & has a gloss to it almost. The sizes range from 4.5cm x 2.5cm to 5.5cm x 3.5cm. I was hoping to get some help to ID these strange looking objects a
  20. 500 million-year-old fossil is the granddaddy of all cephalopods By Laura Geggel, Live Science, March 29, 2021 Cephalopods: Older Than was thought? Press Release No. 24/2021, Heidelberg University, March 23, 2021 The open access paper is: Hildenbrand, A., Austermann, G., Fuchs, D., Bengtson, P. and Stinnesbeck, W., 2021. A potential cephalopod from the early Cambrian of eastern Newfoundland, Canada. Communications Biology, 4(1), pp.1-11. open access Yours, Paul H.
  21. Hello everyone, my first post here. Am I correct in calling this a cretaceous trace fossil? Found by me probably 50yrs ago, in a local sandpit, I think, or on Lake Ontario shoreline. Looks to me like images of cobbles from Faringdon, England. (I've got an odd assortment of interesting rocks, artifacts and fossils from my childhood explorations, but only now trying to learn more about them. ) All help very much appreciated! Hope to learn a lot here. Thank you.
  22. Hello all, Here are a few Diplichnites incertipies specimens that I found on a 2019 expedition in Nova Scotia. It is illegal to collect fossils in NS without a permit, however all the fossils found at this site (see large arthropluera tracks and tetrapod footprints in prior posts) have been brought to the local museums attention. Stay tuned for more! I hope you enjoy, FossilsNS
  23. Hey guys! My first scientific publication has just been released online by the journal Geological Magazine in association with Cambridge University Press (see link below). My study describes the first probable deinonychosaur tracks from Canada, which my colleagues and I found and documented at a large dinosaur tracksite (about 72.5 million years old) near the city of Grande Prairie in Alberta, Canada. Four traces occur in possible trackway association, while another isolated track that is in exactly the same direction is located nearby on the same bedding plane, suggestive of at least tw
  24. Owen Ridgen

    A few Fossils from recently

    Hello everyone, thanks for letting me join the site! I'm an amateur fossil hunter from Toronto who has made a few expeditions in the past months. I've found a few fossils of interest that I'd like some help identifying. Below are links to photos of the fossils in question on my iNaturalist page, along with some additional details. Thanks all in advance! The following were all found along the Don River in Toronto. 1. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68570190 2. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68573964 3. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/685701
  25. badeend

    Possible Acer leaf

    Hello, I bought this leaf from the internet from someone who told be it might be from Canada. I googled is it but I could nt find a great simularity in Cananda. So I showed it a friend and he said it could be a leaf from the Green River Formation. Can anyone confirm this? Or tell me where it could come from? Thanks in advance!
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