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  1. This is something I just found out yesterday, but feel is amazing enough to share on the fourm (especially to all those who study Carcharocles (Otodus) megalodon)!!! I was researching shark diversity during the late Eocene when I came across some info on a fossil Shark rostral node specimens from the Zanclean Pilocene sections of the Yorktown Formation dating around 5.3-3.6 Million Years ago in what is now North Carolina. The Specimens USNM 474994, 474995, 474996, 474997, 474998, and 474999 belongs to juvenile sharks (with USNM 474998 belonging to an individual shark of about 1.46 meters (4.8 feet) in length). Originally believed to be rostral nodes of a Lamna sp., they were reanalyzed and discovered by Scientists Dr. Frederik H. Mullen and Dr. John W.M. Jagt to be from Juvenile Otodontidae Sharks. (also, USNM = National Museum of Natural History, Washington D.C., U.S.A.) Mollen, F.H. and Jagt, J.W.M. (2012). The taxonomic value of rostral nodes of extinct sharks, with comments on previous records of the genus Lamna (Lamniformes, Lamnidae) from the Pliocene of Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina (USA). Acta Geologica Polonica, 62(1), 117–127. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262142193_The_taxonomic_value_of_rostral_nodes_of_extinct_sharks_with_comments_on_previous_records_of_the_genus_Lamna_Lamniformes_Lamnidae_from_the_Pliocene_of_Lee_Creek_Mine_North_Carolina_USA Reconstruction by Tyler Greenfield, 2021 This research also strongly indicates/directly suggests these rostral node specimens might belong to fetal or newborn individuals of Carcharocles (Otodus) megalodon!!! If correct, it would be the one of the most significant finds in terms of non-tooth C. megalodon fossil material since the relatively recent discovery of specimen IRSNB P9893 (also known as IRSNB 3121), a pretty complete C. megalodon fossil vertebrae column from a Miocene Formation in what is now Belgium!!! Shimada, Kenshu & Bonnan, Matthew & Becker, Martin & Griffiths, Michael. (2021). Ontogenetic growth pattern of the extinct megatooth shark Otodus megalodon —implications for its reproductive biology, development, and life expectancy. Historical Biology. 33(12), 1-6. 10.1080/08912963.2020.1861608. https://par.nsf.gov/servlets/purl/10293771
  2. I've recently read a 2020 scientific paper describing pretty accurately the multiple nurseries that Carcharocles (Otodus) megalodon had established to raise young between the Miocene-Pliocene 23-3.6 Million Years ago (not just a single nursery in what is now Panama as previously thought). Herraiz, J. L., Ribé, J., Botella, H., Martínez-Pérez, C., & Ferrón, H. G. (2020). Use of nursery areas by the extinct megatooth shark Otodus megalodon (Chondrichthyes: Lamniformes). Biology Letters, 16(11), 20200746. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2020.0746 https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsbl.2020.0746 What I also found interesting about this paper was that the geologic latest nursery area the researchers identified is what is now the Yorktown Formation, North Carolina. Images Credit: https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsbl.2020.0746 C. megalodon went extinct in the Mediterranean as a result of the Messinian Salinity crisis 5.59 Million Years ago. The emergence of Orcas (Orcinus) and the Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias), a decrease in diatom diversity during the middle miocene-pliocene, and the miocene formation of the Isthmus of Panama which changed ocean current patterns also helped caused a decline in C. megalodon's population by the Pliocene. But this 2020 paper has got me thinking about where did C. megalodon as a species make its last stand? Was the Yorktown Formation in North Carolina C. megalodon's last stronghold?
  3. The era between the Miocene and Pliocene (23-2.3 Million Years ago) was, like the Carboniferous era 300 Million Years before, a golden age for the Chondricthyans. Not only was there a massive explosion in the diversity of grey sharks, but there was the emergence of perhaps the largest number of large macropredatory shark genera (sharks greater than 3 meters (10 feet) in length) currently known in Earth's geologic history. This includes the Giant Thrasher Shark Alopias grandis (which grew up to 13 meters (feet) in length) and the famous Carcharocles (Otodus) megalodon (which grew up to 17 meters (55 feet) in length). https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.abm9424 But this golden era of the giant macro predatory sharks wouldn't last, for between 3.8-2.4 Million Years ago there was an extinction event of large marine fauna that killed at least 14% of large marine fauna genera, including Carcharcoles (Otodus) megalodon. Though it's not entirely clear what caused this extinction event (some have hypothesized it could've been a mild gamma ray burst), C.megalodon's decline was due to the closing of the Isthmus of Panama by 4.5 Million Years ago (an area that was a C.megalodon nursery), a decline in diatoms that caused a decline in the food sources of many whales like Cetothere whales including Cetotherium (a known food source of C. megalodon), and Competition with the recently emerged Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) and Orcas (Orcinus). By the extinction events end, most of the Miocene's large predatory sharks were extinct. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6377595/ https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0084857 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318160879_The_Pliocene_marine_megafauna_extinction_and_its_impact_on_functional_diversity https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsbl.2020.0746 But there was a few genera that survived the extinction event 3.6-2.4 Million Years ago and lived long after it. These surviving taxon (likely surviving due to relying on different food sources then other large sharks of the miocene-pliocene) lived previously alongside C. megalodon and some survived up to at least the early Pleistocene (120,000-100,000 years ago). Here's a list of the large (non Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias)) macropredatory sharks of the late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene (If I'm missing any examples, let me know and I'll quickly add them). Hemipristis serra (Hemigaleidae, grew up to 3-5 meters (10-16 feet) in length) (Miocene-Pleistocene (Pleistocene strongholds: What is now Indonesia, Taiwan, South Carolina (U.S.), Alabama (U.S.), and Florida (U.S.)), 23.03-0.012 Million Years ago) Reconstruction 1 and 2 Image by artist @Tetrtophoneus, Image credit: https://www.deviantart.com/teratophoneus/art/Hemipristis-serra-871902574 Image by artist @HodariNundu (the two sharks below and next to the juvenile C.megalodon at the middle top are adult Hemipristis serra), Image credit: https://www.deviantart.com/hodarinundu/art/Mobbing-Meg-885731702 http://www.fossilworks.org/cgi-bin/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=83182 https://www.fossilguy.com/gallery/vert/fish-shark/hemipristis/hemipristis.htm https://www.researchgate.net/publication/364591134_A_previously_overlooked_highly_diverse_early_Pleistocene_elasmobranch_assemblage_from_southern_Taiwan Parotodus benedeni (Otodontidae, grew up to 7.6 meters (24.9 feet) in length) (Oligocene-Pleistocene (Pleistocene strongholds: What is now South Carolina (U.S.)), 33.9-0.012 Million Years ago) Reconstructions 1 and 2 Image by artist @imAdro, Image credit: https://www.deviantart.com/imadro/art/Parotodus-benedeni-908901669 Image by artist @SameerPrehistorica, Image credit: https://www.deviantart.com/sameerprehistorica/art/Parotodus-Size-882947974 http://www.fossilworks.org/cgi-bin/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=389883 https://www.petit-fichier.fr/2013/01/27/kent-b-w-1999-taille-parotodus-benedenii/? https://www.researchgate.net/publication/337937278_2019-canevet-a-review-of_the-extinct-genus-Parotodus https://www.app.pan.pl/archive/published/app63/app004542018.pdf http://www.fossilworks.org/cgi-bin/bridge.pl?a=collectionSearch&taxon_no=389883&max_interval=Quaternary&country=United States&state=South Carolina&is_real_user=1&basic=yes&type=view&match_subgenera=1 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/paleobiology/article/chondrichthyan-fossil-record-of-the-florida-platform-eocenepleistocene/2835CCEC27DC8EE0B24A5B62B1416618 Cosmopolitodus hastalis (Lamnidae, grew up to 5-7 meters (16.4-22.9 feet) in length) (Oligocene-Pleistocene (Pleistocene strongholds: What is now Japan, South Carolina (U.S.), Alabama (U.S.), and Florida (U.S.)), 30-0.012 Million Years ago) Reconstruction Image by artist @artbyjrc, Image credit: https://www.deviantart.com/artbyjrc/art/Going-to-need-a-bigger-boat-Lamnid-sharks-837971394 http://www.fossilworks.org/cgi-bin/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=265174 https://actapalrom.geo-paleontologica.org/Online_first/Chan_Cosmopolidus_planus.pdf Note: Cosmopolitodus hastalis was an ancestor to the extant Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias), along with living alongside the Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) between the Miocene-Pleistocene. However, Cosmopolitodus hastalis’s being a member of the genus Carcharodon has yet to be confirmed). I hope you all find this helpful?
  4. The Chondricthyans (including the sharks and rays) have been around and keeping the ocean's ecosystems healthy for about 420 Million Years. Today, in celebration of this, I've decided to do a little fun post and list the eight times in Earth's history truly massive chondricthyans have emerged. Hope you all enjoy!!! The First is the Devonian, where there is at least one confirmed fossil (CMNH 5238) of a large currently unnamed Ctenacanthiform shark that reached lengths of 4.2-5 meters (13-16 feet) in length. https://www.mdpi.com/1424-2818/15/3/318 The Second is the Mississippian stage of the Carboniferous (358.9-323.2 Million Years ago), a golden age for chondricthyans. The Early Carboniferous saw the emergence of Giant Ctenacanthiform sharks like Saivodus striatus, which grew up to 10-11 meters (32-36 feet) in length. https://www.uky.edu/KGS/fossils/fossil-of-the-month_2022-07_Saivodus.php https://www.uky.edu/KGS/fossils/fossil-of-the-month_2022-07_how-big.php https://www.nps.gov/articles/000/fossils-of-the-2023-national-fossil-day-artwork.htm The Third is the Pennsylvanian stage of the Carboniferous (323.2-298.9 Million Years ago). Like the Mississippian, the Pennsylvanian was also a golden stage for Chondricthyans where large Ctenacanthiforms continued to thrive and large Eugeneodontida edestoids like Edestus (which could grow up to 6.7 meters (22 feet) in length) emerged. Large Ctenacanthiforms from this time include the unnamed Graham Formation Gilkmanius sp., which grew up to 7 meters (22 feet) in length. https://bioone.org/journals/journal-of-vertebrate-paleontology/volume-37/issue-3/02724634.2017.1325369/A-Pennsylvanian-Supershark-from-Texas/10.1080/02724634.2017.1325369.short The Fourth is the Permian (298-252 Million years ago). There were some large sharks, like the Ctenacanthiform Kaibabvenator (which grew up to 4.8-5.48 meters (16-18 feet) in length). But Eugeneodontida by this point contained the largest Chondricthyans alive at this time including Helicoprion (which grew up to 7.6 meters (25 feet) in length) and Parahelicoprion (which could grow up to 12 meters (36 feet) in length). https://www.academia.edu/29941296/Chondrichthyan_and_actinopterygian_remains_from_theLower_Permian_Copacabana_Formation_of_Bolivia https://doi.org/10.1002%2Far.24046 The Fifth is the Early Cretaceous (145-100 Million Years ago). Though the time's aquatic ecosystems was dominated by large marine reptiles, large sharks managed to emerge and fill ecological niches from time to time. This includes the Early Cretaceous Shark Leptostyrax, which grew up to 6.3 meters (20 feet) in length. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/277782424_A_Gigantic_Shark_from_the_Lower_Cretaceous_Duck_Creek_Formation_of_Texas The Sixth is the Late Cretaceous (100-66 Million years ago). Aquatic ecosystems still were dominated by marine reptiles, but large sharks were indeed present. This includes Cretodus crassidens (which grew up to 9-11 meters (29-36 meters) in length) and Ptychodus (which grew up to 10 meters (32 feet) in length). https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0231544 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-paleontology/article/morphology-and-paleobiology-of-the-late-cretaceous-largesized-shark-cretodus-crassidens-dixon-1850-neoselachii-lamniformes/A670012A44DDC68FC098BB8C73368408 The seventh is the Miocene-Early Pilocene (23-3.6 Million Years ago). This period saw the rise and reign of some of the largest sharks known currently in the fossil record, including Carcharocles (Otodus) megalodon (which grew up to 17 meters (55 feet) in length). https://www.uv.es/everlab/PUBLICACIONES/2017/2017 Martinez-Perez et al HB miocene sharks.pdf https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.abl6529 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9385135/ The eighth is the Early Pliocene-Late Pleistocene (3.6-0.012 Million Years ago). This period saw the last remnants of the large 20 foot + in size carnivorous sharks from the Miocene-Pilocene mega shark era not including the non-Great White shark (Carcharodon carcharias) and not including the large plankton eating sharks make their final stand. These include Hemipristis serra (which grew up to 6 meters (20 feet) in length) and Parotodus benedeni (which grew up to 7.6 meters (24 feet) in length). https://www.app.pan.pl/archive/published/app63/app004542018.pdf https://www.researchgate.net/publication/364591134_A_previously_overlooked_highly_diverse_early_Pleistocene_elasmobranch_assemblage_from_southern_Taiwan https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/paleobiology/article/chondrichthyan-fossil-record-of-the-florida-platform-eocenepleistocene/2835CCEC27DC8EE0B24A5B62B1416618 I hope this is helpful?
  5. Recently I found a really interesting article rom 2021 describing fossilized specimens (in the form of teeth) of the giant shark Carcharocles (Otodus) megalodon from Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. Here is the article: De Pasqua, J., Agnolin, F., Rolando, A. M., Bogan, S., & Gambetta, D. (2021). First occurrence of the giant shark Carcharocles Megalodon (Agassiz, 1843) (Lamniformes; Otodontidae) at Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. Revista Brasileira De Paleontologia, 24(2), 141–148. https://doi.org/10.4072/rbp.2021.2.05 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/354201776_First_occurrence_of_the_giant_shark_Carcharocles_megalodon_Agassiz_1843_Lamniformes_Otodontidae_at_Buenos_Aires_Province_Argentina What really actually baffled me was the age the scientists who authored the paper assigned to the specimens. The specimen MMDA-1 was found close to the Atlantic coast in sedimentary deposits consisting of five depositional sequences (DS) dating between the Miocene and early Pleistocene eras. The authors state its possible the specimen came from DS5 or DS4, which date between the late Pilocene-early Pleistocene eras. If this is correct, this would make this incredible find even more incredible as it would represent the youngest known Carcharocles (Otodus) megaldon fossils (and no, I'm definitely not counting the HMS Challenger specimens as it's pretty much been confirmed those specimens are much much older than several thousand years old). Also, this is not potential proof C. megalodon survived into the Holocene! Though, I'm am a bit skeptical about the age give it was found in a pretty loose sedimentary deposit by the coast! What do you guys think? Do you think specimen MMDA-1 could be from the late Pilocene-early Pleistocene or do you think it could be older?
  6. marcsath77

    Fake or real Megadolon tooth

    Dear all As a non-scientist I´d be glad if I could get your opinion on the authenticity of a Carcharocles megalodon tooth I have purchased off an auction site. It is missing some part, so I could get it for a reasonable price since the spotless teeth are way out my budget. Do you think this tooth could be legit? Many thanks for your expertise.
  7. I've been visiting this forum since a long time and never registered. I appreciate how valuable its content is. Marine fauna has always been of my interest. As a kid I used to gather books with mosasaurids and plesiosaurids. I collect Carcharocles megalodon teeth (without restorations) and many other fossils, including these to be found in Poland as well. Stay safe everyone in this difficult time.
  8. ThePhysicist

    Hubbell Megalodon

    From the album: Sharks

    Hubbell (juvenile) megalodon, likely from the East Coast. I don't understand the hype surrounding megalodon, but this one was cool enough for the collection. It has good preservation, and the tip is spalled-off from feeding.
  9. BellamyBlake

    Exotic Megalodons!

    I've been acquiring Megalodon teeth from different localities over the past weeks. It's an ongoing project. I'm thrilled to share the first bit of my collection! I thank various members for sharing their knowledge of these localities with me. I would like to thank in particular @Praefectus for bouncing ideas, and for offering his thoughts on the legitimacy of almost every one of these; I also thank @gigantoraptor for generously gifting me the Dutch Meg!
  10. blizzardstorm06

    Megalodon from my creek

    Scientific Name: Carcharocles megalodon Geologic Age: Miocene clay Location: Southern Maryland, USA Date: April 19, 2020 I love searching our creek for interesting finds. Last summer we started discovering large fossilized scallops. Then recently I started finding various shark teeth and ray plates. I was thrilled to reach down and pull up a megalodon from the creek for the first time. It is about 3.5 inches long, slightly longer on the other side. My parents helped me document this find here, it's our first time posting and we think this is the right place for the contest, if not, we are sorry!
  11. Oxytropidoceras

    Megalodon hunting in Baja California

    Giant sharks south of Ensenada American fossil hunter returns his finds to Baja By Daniel Powell, San Diego Reader, Sept. 11, 2019 https://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2019/sep/11/feature-giant-sharks-south-ensenada/ Yours, Paul H.
  12. Dwinge28

    Carcharocles megalodon

    My first meg found summerville sc chandler Bridge Creek 3 inches
  13. ThePhysicist

    Carcharocles megalodon

    From the album: Sharks

    Two small megalodon teeth from N. Carolina.
  14. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Carcharocles megalodon 01

    From the album: Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon ACE River Basin, SC

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  15. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Carcharocles megalodon 02

    From the album: Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon ACE River Basin, SC 5.3"

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  16. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Carcharocles megalodon 03

    From the album: Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon Bone Valley, FL

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  17. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Carcharocles megalodon 04

    From the album: Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon Bone Valley, FL

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  18. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Carcharocles megalodon 05

    From the album: Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon Bone Valley, Florida Bite damage with marks visible ....

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  19. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Carcharocles megalodon 06

    From the album: Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon Venice Beach, Florida

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  20. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Carcharocles megalodon 07

    From the album: Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon Venice Beach, Florida

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  21. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Carcharocles megalodon 08

    From the album: Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon Bone Valley Florida

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  22. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Carcharocles megalodon 10

    From the album: Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon Bone Valley, Florida

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  23. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    Carcharocles megalodon 11

    From the album: Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharocles megalodon Golden Beach, Florida

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  24. Brett Breakin' Rocks

    5 inch Meg in the summer ... finally

    Whoo Boy .. what a Friday ! I decided that this was the day I was gonna pull a Meg out of the water. I even called it with my wife present, and she gave me the same rolled eyes to the ceiling look .. haha. I had dropped in two weeks prior and pulled out 3 fraglodons in the 2-3in range in the same spot so I suspected that there were other large chunks to be had if not a whole tooth. These teeth are from a re-worked layer so in the stream they can take a further beating. On the whole the rains have been pretty steady on and off the past few weeks and the water was murky unfortunately. Making it hard to know where I was searching. The humidity was at a wonderful 98% so I was sweating like a yeti in July but thankfully the mosquitoes were absent. The teeth at this spot were not as small, or well preserved for the most part. A few small verts, mako teeth, more fish teeth than I've ever found, a really worn toothed whale, and about a dozen fragmented angustiden teeth. At this spot I was able to score my most complete angy to date in the water. The cusps intact are rare in the stream bed, I've seen them often pristine but these usually are from diggers that attack the banks or land sites. The meg wasn't deep and I flipped it up off the bottom using a sand flea rake of all things .. must've stepped on it a few times before I found it. I hardly ever use that rake. 5 inches on the slant. It's taken over a year so there was nothing easy about it, just happened to get lucky and read the signs. Cheers, Brett a few of the other finds.
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