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  1. King Butler

    Ceratopsian Literature

    Hello, I wanted to ask if anyone could point me to any good books, papers or even recorded presentations on ceratopsians? I’m after general overview information on them, though anything that provide a good break down of the different species would be nice also.
  2. musicnfossils

    Skull Chunks?

    Found these pieces sitting together today and I’m wondering if they might be pieces of a ceratopsian skull. Don’t seem to fit together so they might not be from the same dinosaur. They have similar texture to other ceratopsian skull bones I have including a lacrimal and frill pieces, but I might be off on that assumption. Dinosaur park fm. I’ll also toss this in too, though I haven’t cleaned it at all so it might be hard to ID. It’s a separate piece, and was so weird I couldn’t leave it behind.
  3. Per Christian

    Styracosaurus hoof?

    Hi all, I came across this fossil for sale. It's listed as Styracosaurus, and comes from the Judith River Formation, hill county Northern Montana. It's 2.5 inches across. Does it look ceratopsian?
  4. Psittacosaurus fossils are really hard to find on the web currently so am looking to trade my fossils for a psittacosaurus skull of a psittacosaurus here's the fossils I am trading The oreodont skull and the spinosaurus also come with a certificate This is a oreodont skull from South Dakota it has a little restoration A nice 4.7 inch spinosaurus tooth ...and this is a ceratopsian Epoccipital from Powder River, Montana
  5. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus (2)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA 3.5 cm height On the ranch where this tooth was found, only T. prorsus skulls have been found in the 30+ years the company has operated there, lending a very probable, precise identification for this Ceratopsian tooth. (T. prorsus was one of the last dinosaurs, younger than T. horridus. The two species are also stratigraphically separated in the Hell Creek Fm., so it makes sense that one may only find one species in a particular deposit.) For most Ceratopsid teeth (from the Hell Creek Fm., for example),
  6. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus Tooth

    Identification: On the ranch where this tooth was found, only T. prorsus skulls have been found in the 30+ years the company has operated there, lending a very probable, precise identification for this Ceratopsian tooth. (T. prorsus was one of the last dinosaurs, younger than T. horridus. The two species are also stratigraphically separated in the Hell Creek Fm.[2], so it makes sense that one may only find one species in a particular deposit.) For most Ceratopsid teeth (from the Hell Creek Fm., for example), only association with an identifiable skull can allow for identification beyond C
  7. Ludwigia

    Sara

    From the album: Sketches

    Our favorite traveling ceratopsian.
  8. Ludwigia

    A Portrait of Sara

    As a lot of you have probably noticed, Sara the Ceratopsian has been spending a week or so in Germany with me. We managed to find some time between our various adventures where Sara was able to sit still for a few minutes each day so that I could work on her portrait. So, without further ado... Tim was just so gracious as to improve the quality of the picture, so I'm adding that below.
  9. dingo2

    Is this a triceratops horn?

    Found in the scollard formation. Seems to have the blood grooves and general shape that I've seen on horns. I'm guessing it would just be a section from the tip. @Troodon
  10. ThePhysicist

    T. prorsus feeding wear

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A Triceratops tooth from the Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD.
  11. Squirrelman91

    Judith River Ceratopsian Horn?

    I have this chunk of bone from the Judith River formation of Hill County, Montana, and I was wondering if this is a partial horn? It was found with some other small skull fragments, but this is the main piece. Does anybody more familiar with ceratopsian horns have any insight? It is 5.3 inches in length (I forgot a ruler picture, my apologies). Thanks in advance!
  12. musicnfossils

    March Has Been Pretty Nice...

    ...so I headed out to find some Dinos. All fossils dinosaur park fm. Got some new land permissions so I have lots of area to wander. Here’s some notable finds from today. Large hadrosaur (or possibly ceratopsian) foot bone, large hadrosaur foot claw, tyrannosaurid caudal vert, possible tyrannosaurid toe bone, and some indet. fused verts. These will be pictured, there were various other verts and smaller bones found that I may post later.
  13. ThePhysicist

    Ceratopsian spit tooth wear surface

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Commonly called "spit teeth," these teeth were shed by the animal after heavy usage. ^From "Wear biomechanics in the slicing dentition of the giant horned dinosaur Triceratops"
  14. ThePhysicist

    Ceratopsian spit tooth

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Commonly called "spit teeth," these teeth were shed by the animal after heavy usage. ^From "Wear biomechanics in the slicing dentition of the giant horned dinosaur Triceratops"
  15. I purchased these two fossils a while ago. Both are from the Hell Creek Formation in South Dakota, and both were described as hadrosaur jaws. They definitely seem to resemble the jaws of hadrosaurs, however I've noticed that the empty tooth rows of ceratopsians look extremely similar (to my untrained eyes), which is making me reconsider the seller's ID. I am hoping that someone out there with more knowledge can state confidently if these are ceratopsian or hadrosaur, and preferably if they can briefly explain why they think so. Bonus points if you can state if these are from the upper or l
  16. I purchased this tooth a while back and i’ve always been suspicious about its authenticity, however i’m not sure. it’s advertised from the Hell Creek formation, and said to be a triceratops tooth
  17. https://peerj.com/articles/9251/ Free to read and view
  18. patrickhudson

    Ceratopsian frill?

    I posted this a while ago, but I’ve cleaned it up and taken a different angle of the agatized inside. Montana milk river Judith formation. It seems to have the vessel grooves on one side, but is obviously very worn. Agatized heavily only the inside but even visible from the outside. the agatized portion looks super similar to another bone found in the area (fourth pic). I don’t know how the agate process works, but the one the fourth picture that sure seems like a bone has the same agate characteristics as the “frill” -or... maybe it’s a rock again- fourth p
  19. Reptilia

    Ceratopsian Parietal Spike

    Hey guys! So about four years ago, someone sold me a really cheap batch of unprepped fossils they dug up in the US; which included a large piece of rib bone (or so the seller thought). I started prepping the 'rib', and thought it looked a little strange. It had a tendon running along the bottom; which seemed weird as it was supposed to be a rib. However, I was still pretty new to fossil prep/ID, and I trusted the seller's ID better than my own. I wound up setting it on the shelf for...a couple years. Fast forward to about a week ago. I was cleaning out my fossil stora
  20. LordTrilobite

    Dirk the Triceratops in Leiden

    So the new museum of Naturalis Biodiversity Centre in Leiden, the Netherlands was opened the past weekend and besides having a completely new building and a bunch of new stuff. The T. rex Trix is also back from being on tour in our new dedicated dinosaur hall. But I wanted to share something particular and I'll leave showing the rest of the new museum to others. I volunteer at the museum in the dinosaur prep lab, and over the past years the dino lab team has been prepping away at a whole bunch of Triceratops horridus specimens. It was originally found in 2013 when the museum
  21. dinosaur man

    3 new fossils

    Hi I just got these today and would like to show them. If you need more photos just ask. Thank you and enjoy!! Hadrosaur. indet carpel Horseshoe canyon formation, Drumheller valley, Alberta, Canada.
  22. This report is a bit late, but better late than never! During late July through to mid August 2018 i was on a research trip to study a new Canadian dinosaur footprint site for my Masters degree project. I am based in Australia, and this was the first time i had been to Canada! So of course i had to make the most of it and pay a visit to the world renowned Dinosaur Provincial Park in southern Alberta, arguably the richest site in the world for dinosaur fossils. The park is the best exposure of the Dinosaur Park Formation (which it is now named after), which dates to about 76.5 million years ago
  23. Hi I just bought these two dinosaur fossils from Alberta Canada. A Ceratopsian vert and a Hadrosaur metatarsal. The colouring and look/preservation of the Hadrosaur metatarsal makes me think they didn’t come from the Horseshoe canyon formation like it says but instead the Dinosaur Park formation. since it doesn’t give much information other then the Horseshoe canyon formation it’s possible, Thanks for future help. Ceratopsian vert
  24. Hello! Purchased this piece at a Gem and Mineral show. Seller had the item listed as an unknown dinosaur bone, and potentially thought part of a ceratops horn and acquired in Utah. Bottom looks almost suture like? Honestly, not sure. Got at a good price so it was worth the risk. About 5 inches tall, 3 inches wide, 2 inches thickness. Probably weighs 1-2lbs. Has been glued.
  25. dinosaur man

    Ankylosaur or ceratopsian

    Hi i was wondering how to tell ankylosaur from ceratopsian vertabrea? Thanks.
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