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  1. Hi all, I’m not sure if I’ve posted this find before, but I figured I would anyway because I believe it warrants it’s own thread. I found this find a few years back at one of the localities I most consistently collect at, which is a shaly exposure of the Connelsville Sandstone in western PA. It usually preserves plants quite well, and was described by W.C. Darrah back in the 60s. It has also produced some very early examples of Walchia, an early conifer. However, it is not well known for vertebrate fossils, as sandstones don’t seem to be the preferred type of rock where vertebrates a
  2. oilshale

    Coelacanthus granulatus Agassiz, 1839

    With 10cm body length a relatively small Coelacanthus granulatus (compared to this 60cm specimen: Coelacanthus granulatus Agassiz, 1839 - Fishes - The Fossil Forum ) Literature: L. Agassiz. 1843. Recherches Sur Les Poissons Fossiles. Tome I (livr. 18). Imprimerie de Petitpierre, Neuchatel xxxii-188 Schaumberg, G. Neubeschreibung von Coelacanthus granulatus Agassiz (Actinistia, Pisces) aus dem Kupferschiefer von Richelsdorf (Perm, W.-Deutschland). Paläontol. Z. 52, 169 (1978). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02987700 H.-P. Schultze. 2004. Mesozoic sarcopterygi
  3. I've always loved living fossils, especially the fish. They are relics of an age long lost, offering us a glimpse of an incredible prehistoric world. Some are enigmas that survived countless extinction events since the Devonian. Others are majestic predators that swam alongside the dinosaurs. Let me present my collection of living fossil fishes from the Mesozoic and before. I will begin with one of the most famous of all - the coelacanth Coelacanth Species: Whiteia woodwardi Age: 252.3 - 251.3 mya | early Triassic Formation: Diego Basin; Middle Sakamena Formation
  4. oilshale

    Holophagus penicillatus EGERTON, 1861

    Also known as Undina penicillata. Holophagus is a coelacanth with the classical shape that has remained almost unchanged over millions of years. The name coelacanth means 'hollow spine' (from the Greek koilos = hollow and akantha = spine). The caudal fin is divided into three lobes (diphycercal), the middle lobe is a continuation of the notocord. Holophagus has powerful jaws but tiny teeth. Characteristic for Holophagus is the structure of the head bones (frontal) which are broken through in a characteristic way and look like a light construction.
  5. From the album: Fossildude's Purchased/Gift Fossils

    Whiteia woodwardi Early Triassic Beaufort Group Sakamena Formation Diana Region, Madagascar.

    © 2020 T. Jones

  6. Okay, this may be just wishful thinking, but a girl can hope, right? For your viewing pleasure is an Upper Cretaceous coprolite from the North Sulphur River in Texas, Ozan Formation, Talyor Shale. This little beauty has some unusual fish remains. Any chance this is a caudal fin from a coelacanth? The bones are pretty substantial compared to other fish bones I've seen in coprolites from the area. It does contain scales that are good sized and pretty transparent, with kind of a fingerprint pattern. Obviously, they may not be from the same prey item. Can anyone tell me if these are indeed coelaca
  7. Fossildude19

    Whiteia woodwardi

    From the album: Fossildude's Purchased/Gift Fossils

    Whiteia woodwardi Lower Triassic, Madagascar Coelacanth. This is a recent bargain I was able to scoop up. Even though it is not complete, it still has great details. It will set off my New Jersey Coelacanths nicely.

    © 2020 T. Jones

  8. oilshale

    Coccoderma nudum REIS, 1888

    From the album: Vertebrates

    Coccoderma nudum REIS, 1888 Late Jurassic Tithonian Solnhofen Bavaria Germany Length 32cm
  9. Yasmin95

    Mawsonia skull parts

    Hey y'all, I have some part, probably, Mawsonia. I think the third thing in the top is an angular. The last thing, i think, is the top part of a skull but not from mawsonia but another fish like. Can someone tell me if I am looking in the right direction? Oh, the distance between the 4 linea is 1 cm each. Thank you
  10. Fossildude19

    Diplurus partial

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    Diplurus newarki - partial coelacanth Late Triassic, Newark Supergroup, Newark Basin, Lockatong Formation, North Bergen, NJ, old Granton Quarry G-3 layer.
  11. oilshale

    Holophagus penicilatus Egerton, 1861

    From the album: Vertebrates

    Holophagus penicilatus Egerton, 1861 Late Jurassic Tithonian Painten Germany Length 32cm
  12. Deesri, U., Cavin, L., Amiot, R., Bardet, N., Buffetaut, E., Cuny, G., Giner, S., Martin, J.E. and Suan, G., 2018. A mawsoniid coelacanth (Sarcopterygii: Actinistia) from the Rhaetian (Upper Triassic) of the Peygros quarry, Le Thoronet (Var, southeastern France). Geological Magazine, 155(1), pp. 187-192. PDF file: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318863726_A_mawsoniid_coelacanth_Sarcopterygii_Actinistia_from_the_Rhaetian_Upper_Triassic_of_the_Peygros_quarry_Le_Thoronet_Var_southeastern_France https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Uthump
  13. Schwimmer, D.R., 2002. Giant fossil coelacanths from the Late Cretaceous of the eastern USA. Fernbank Magazine. Faculty Bibliography. 514. http://csuepress.columbusstate.edu/bibliography_faculty/514 The paper is: Schwimmer, D.R., J.D. Stewart & G.D. Williams. Giant fossil coelacanths of the Late Cretaceous in the Eastern United States. Geology 22: 503-506. Nouv. Ser. 139: 187-190. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/252272908_Giant_fossil_coelacanths_of_the_Late_Cretaceous_in_the_eastern_United_States https://www.researchgate.net/pro
  14. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since June 19, 2018.
  15. From the album: Vertebrates

    Piveteauia madagascariensis Lehman 1952 Early Triassic Dienerian Sakamena Formation Ambilobe Madagascar J.-P. Lehman. 1952. Etude complémentaire des poissons de l'Eotrias de Madagascar. Kungliga Svenska Vetenskapsakademiens Handlingar 2:1-201
  16. Hi, I was wondering if permission was needed to collect at what is left of the Granton quarry in N. Bergen NJ? It sounds like a really cool spot but I am unsure if you need permission from Lowes or not. thanks, Dom
  17. Quick question for the experts: I've found a number of marine fossils in Newark Supergroup locations- corals, crinoids, brachiopods, yet I've read that the formation is non-marine. I'm told they could be glacial deposits. I also recall that Coelacanths have been found which I assume were marine. Was the formation marine or not? Or both? Thanks in advance!
  18. Crazyhen

    Coelacanth fossil?

    The fossil shown in the attached photos is said to be a coelacanth from Madagascar? What do you think?
  19. I have one more small Triassic Diplurus coelacanth fish collected many years ago in North Bergen, New Jersey. The fish's head is slightly lifting off the shale matrix along its top and bottom, but remains well attached at the front and back of the head -- see the photos. The lift gap along top and bottom is at most 0.5 to 0.67 mm. Pressing on the head results in a micro-movement down. With careful handling, I don't believe that the head is in any danger of fully detaching. I have little background in prep work, so I would like to ask opinions on: Should anything be done to cement the head
  20. Ptychodus04

    Diplurus Prep

    Here’s a before and after look at a small Diplurus newarki that I just finished for another TFF member, @LoneRanger. This is small and well preserved minus a nasty coating of pyrite on most of the fossil. This prep took 7 hours to complete. Tuesday, I started another specimen that is even smaller! These were collected before I was born! Can you find the fish? Hint, I scribed on it a bit before I thought to take a pic...
  21. Lit.: J. A. Moy-Thomas. 1935. The coelacanth fishes from Madagascar. Geological magazine 72:213-226 Lehmann, J.-P. (1952): Étude complémentaire des poissons de l’Eotrias de Madagascar. Kungliga Svenska Vetenskaps-akademiens Hangdlingar (4), 2 (6): 1-201; Stockholm
  22. Helllo friendly folks of the fossil forum, I have been searching for a coelacanth fossil on and off for years now. I finally found one that preserved all the characteristic fin "limbs" in profile from an Ebayer who acquired it while in Madagascar. I was pleased with the degree of preservation on both split halves. To my surprise, taking a hand lens to the more concave side revealed scale preservation. I know this is typical of bony fish with scutes like Gars from the Green River, WY - but! Is this unusually good for nodules in Madagascar? More to the point, am I keepi
  23. njfossilhunter

    A Field Trip To Granton Quarry

    Fossildude19, JefferyP, fossilsofnj and I went to Granton Quarry in North Bergen NJ to collect in the Lockatong Fm for Triassic fish. We had a great time and we all found some interesting specimens to add to our collections While the others were hard at work I came across a rather interesting flatten oval shaped sediment between two layers of the black shale in a small area I was working and at first I really didn't pay to much attention to it until one of them broke apart and I noticed that they seemed to be filled with tiny fish bones. I took the sections of slabs home and two days later too
  24. Fossildude19

    Reconstruction

    From the album: Fossildude's Late Triassic Lockatong Formation Fossils

    This is a reconstruction of the late Triassic coelacanth, Diplurus newarki. Reworked by me. (reverse black and white) FROM: FOSSILS AND FACIES OF THE CONNECTICUT VALLEY LOWLAND: ECOSYSTEM STRUCTURE AND SEDIMENTARY DYNAMICS ALONG THE FOOTWALL MARGIN OF AN ACTIVE RIFT. Peter M. LeTourneau1,4, Nicholas G. McDonald2, Paul E. Olsen3,4,*, Timothy C. Ku5, and Patrick R. Getty Available HERE.
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