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  1. RuMert

    Crayfish leg

    From the album: Late Jurassic crustaceans of European Russia

    Moscow, Fili Park, Upper Volgian, subditus zone, sandstone
  2. RuMert

    Sifting under snow

    Hi all! Answering @jpc's question about the site's accessibility in winter and if we actually dig under snow. Yes, we do! (something must be not right in the head). Today we tried the dig at -1C'. Had to make a pretty big hole too (the deepest I've seen there). No big teeth found, hopes for the micro-matrix.
  3. RuMert

    Shark tooth (lateral)

    From the album: Moscow region Late Jurassic vertebrates

    Probably Synechodus. Moscow, Fili, Volgian - nikitini zone. Very rare for this site
  4. RuMert

    Shark tooth

    From the album: Moscow region Late Jurassic vertebrates

    Probably Sphenodus, unrooted. Moscow, Fili, Volgian - nikitini zone
  5. Hi all! Here I describe how we sift for Late Jurassic fossils in Moscow Fili Park, in continuation of Fili Park evokes mixed feelings. In fact, now it is the main place for Jurassic fish and reptile teeth. Nowhere else in our Jurassic will you be able to say casually: "I'll go find some teeth", here it is possible. Even in Ulyanovsk, with all its skeletons and verts, teeth have to be searched for a very, very long time. For Muscovites, Fili Park is literally close at hand (for me, for example, it takes a little over half an hour to get there). In addition, Fili Park introduces hobbyists to all types of paleo-activities: excavation, sifting, preparation, stabilization, gluing, varnishing, water management, sorting out micro-matrix, etc. On the other hand, it's the most difficult site I have seen in our Jurassic and certainly not a place for a pleasant pastime. Cold, mud, mosquitoes, nettles, everything is flooded with water, everything crumbles and collapses, pouring water and mud on you, while you try to get out your boots gone knee-deep in mud. There are few holes, and digging another is complicated. The place is full of stones, branches and debris, and over the years everything has been so dug up and down that the likelihood of making your way through tons of dirt, debris and old dumps in vain is very high. Excavation and operation of a hole is not a matter of one day or even one person. Dozens of people dig and sift in one hole for a month, with the number of interesting finds combined counted on the fingers of one hand. This year's holes: Unlike Cretaceous sites, micro-matrix in Fili does not consist of teeth in any way. You will not find 60 teeth from a bucket of mud in any wash fraction. In addition, it contains an annoying amount of pseudo-fossils, including those similar to teeth: seeds, twigs, insects, modern shells, black phragmocons and serpula fragments, shiny pebbles, etc. In this regard, there are also objects like this: As far as I understand, these belong to modern insects, if not, please correct. With all this being said, the small size of the location is surprising: all the adventures of recent years have taken place on a small area of 50 by 20 m. I once witnessed guys complaining they could not find teeth by sifting mud. Naive folks! They did not realize the tooth layer was a meter UNDER the stream bed. And the latter is by the way the lowest point of the site. The nikitini zone begins with a thick layer of belemnite shell rock, reminiscent of a concrete lid. After getting through, the matrix becomes soft again, and the pink fulgens fossils get replaced by the black and white palette of nikitini layer. I would call large brachiopods of the genus Mosquella its marker. Instead of smooth kachpurite ammonites, ribbed epivirgatites begin to appear, and rare large (up to 40 cm) lomonossovellas become visible. Each trip for nikitini fossils takes about three hours to clear the old hole. That's why it is important not to postpone the excavation, but keep it within one day, arriving at dawn. Any hole crumbles constantly before the eyes, all the abomination from rubbish and glass to the walls of the fulgens zone slides right into the center of the hole and sinks to the very bottom. Do not try to reinforce the walls with branches and stones, or later you'll have to get all of this out of the target layer. Instead, try to divert as much water as possible from the excavation. See where the streams come from and cut new channels for them. Try not to splash on the walls and do not allow the scooped water to flow back into the hole. The walls collapse where the water flows. Do not make vertical walls, obtuse angles prevent the edges from collapsing. A typical pit in a pit, the smaller hole's edges are formed by the walls of the nikitini belemnite shell rock: For better understanding. Shovel, buckets, sieves, chair. The water has been drained out. The stream is to the right: First of all, in an old (any not freshly dug) hole, you'll have to scoop out several hundred liters of water (the procedure will have to be repeated several times a day). A regular bucket works best here. Unfortunately, the pumps cannot cope with the job. They are either submersible or designed for clean water, etc. Basically a weak surface fecal pump is needed, but there are none for sale. Last time, amateurs in ordinary rubber boots (lol) asked us how we had "drained the hole". With our own hands, getting there in waders up to the max At the second stage, you will need to scoop out all the dirt and debris, a medium-sized fishing scoop helps here (in my opinion, better than a shovel). It is useful when clearing a hole, quickly scooping out water and working with mud. "Awesome" Fili slurry, aka the matrix:
  6. RuMert

    Small shark tooth

    From the album: Moscow region Late Jurassic vertebrates

    Fili Park, Volgian-Nikitini zone
  7. RuMert

    Squatina sp.

    From the album: Moscow region Late Jurassic vertebrates

    Fili Park, Volgian-Nikitini zone
  8. RuMert

    Epivirgatites bipliciformis

    From the album: Russian Lower/Middle Volgian ammonites

    Another species of the nikitini zone in Fili, rarely preserved
  9. RuMert

    Fili Park Lomonossovella

    From the album: Russian Lower/Middle Volgian ammonites

    One of the best preserved Lomonossovella lomonossovi, Moscow, Fili Park, nikitini zone
  10. RuMert

    Autumn

    From the album: Russian Upper Volgian ammonites

    Kachpurites fulgens, Moscow, Fili park, fulgens zone
  11. RuMert

    Kachpurites fulgens 2

  12. RuMert

    Kachpurites fulgens 1

    From the album: Russian Upper Volgian ammonites

    Moscow, Fili Park, Kachpurites fulgens zone. Ammonites have pinkish color, fragile and very rarely preserved with umbilicus
  13. RuMert

    Kachpurites fulgens troika

    From the album: Russian Upper Volgian ammonites

    Better than average preservation
  14. From the album: Russian Upper Volgian ammonites

    Rarely preserved bell-like aperture
  15. From the album: Russian Upper Volgian ammonites

    Moscow, Fili Park, subditus/catenulatum zone
  16. RuMert

    Garniericeras catenulatum

    From the album: Russian Upper Volgian ammonites

    Moscow, Fili Park, subditus/catenulatum zone
  17. RuMert

    Craspedites subditus

    From the album: Russian Upper Volgian ammonites

    Moscow, Fili Park, subditus/catenulatum zone
  18. RuMert

    Garniericeras interjectum

    From the album: Russian Upper Volgian ammonites

    Moscow, Fili Park, subditus/catenulatum zone. Transitional Garniericeras species, 2 cm
  19. RuMert

    Garniericeras interjectum

    From the album: Russian Upper Volgian ammonites

    Moscow, Fili Park, subditus/catenulatum zone. Transitional Garniericeras species, 2 cm
  20. RuMert

    Typical Fili Park finds

    From the album: Late Jurassic belemnites of European Russia

    Lots of nature lovers visit the site to collect belemnites. They are not large and require someone to actually dig holes more or less frequently, otherwise they are quickly depleted. Here are the biggest specimens, 6-8 cm long
  21. RuMert

    Eucyclus gastropod, Fili

    From the album: Late Jurassic gastropods of European Russia

    Moscow, Fili Park, Upper Volgian, nikitini zone. Numerous
  22. RuMert

    Berlieria gastropod, Fili

    From the album: Late Jurassic gastropods of European Russia

    Moscow, Fili Park, Upper Volgian, nikitini zone. Rare
  23. RuMert

    Bathrotomaria gastropod, Fili

    From the album: Late Jurassic gastropods of European Russia

    Moscow, Fili Park, Upper Volgian, nikitini zone. Uncommon
  24. RuMert

    Fili gastropod variety

    From the album: Late Jurassic gastropods of European Russia

    Moscow, Fili Park, Upper Volgian, subditus zone. Rarely preserved
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