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Found 21 results

  1. Dear Friends, I'd like to show one of my botanical finds from Baltic amber ( Eocene ) The best fruit on the twig i ever had and saw. Oxalidaceae. "Berry". Perfect one. Size 8mm Botanical inclusions are much more rare than arthropods for Baltic Ambers. Private collection. Better quality pic - https://ibb.co/kQgZb2b Enjoy Artur
  2. Deborah Cosgrove

    Is this a petrified fruit?

    I found this petrified persimmon looking thing with arrow heads and other things at an auction. It is very hard like stone. Any ideas?
  3. I_gotta_rock

    Calling Palebotanists!

    Ya know, I'm great at plant identification if it's currently growing in my region. Dive back to the Paleozoic and I can tell Calamites from Cordaites, but that's about my limit without a book in hand. So far, I've had 8 and I still don't know what this is! I'm pondering the frond-like object running diagonally across the center of the picture. It looks like a fruiting body from Cordaites, but it lacks the sporophyll. It also resembles Corynepteris angustissima, but the only illustration I can find lacks sufficient detail. This came from a mid-late Pennsylvanian Lewellyn Formation e
  4. I just received confirmation from Professor Steven R. Manchester, Curator of Paleobotany Florida Museum of Natural History, that I do in fact have Bonanzacarpum sprungerorum! Special thanks to doushantuo's post (additions to paleocarpological knowledge:The Eocene) that restarted my identification quest and Paleoflor for encouraging me to pursue it. And TTF for giving me the venue to request identification assistance.
  5. Rcotton1

    Berries 3.jpg

    From the album: 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Vegitation

    The majority of these berries are ground cherries from about 52 Ma years ago with the fruit fossilized. This is very rare to have so many specimens with the soft fruit still attached to the host.
  6. Rcotton1

    Berries 7.jpg

    From the album: 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Vegitation

    The majority of these berries are ground cherries from about 52 Ma years ago with the fruit fossilized. This is very rare to have so many specimens with the soft fruit still attached to the host.
  7. Rcotton1

    Berries 6.jpg

    From the album: 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Vegitation

    The majority of these berries are ground cherries from about 52 Ma years ago with the fruit fossilized. This is very rare to have so many specimens with the soft fruit still attached to the host.
  8. Rcotton1

    Berries 5.jpg

    From the album: 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Vegitation

    The majority of these berries are ground cherries from about 52 Ma years ago with the fruit fossilized. This is very rare to have so many specimens with the soft fruit still attached to the host.
  9. Rcotton1

    Berries 4.jpg

    From the album: 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Vegitation

    The majority of these berries are ground cherries from about 52 Ma years ago with the fruit fossilized. This is very rare to have so many specimens with the soft fruit still attached to the host.
  10. Rcotton1

    Berries 2.jpg

    From the album: 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Vegitation

    The majority of these berries are ground cherries from about 52 Ma years ago with the fruit fossilized. This is very rare to have so many specimens with the soft fruit still attached to the host.
  11. Rcotton1

    Berries 1.jpg

    From the album: 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Vegitation

    The majority of these berries are ground cherries from about 52 Ma years ago with the fruit fossilized. This is very rare to have so many specimens with the soft fruit still attached to the host.
  12. jimm

    possible petrified fruit

    I found a 5 centimeter (2 inch) diameter rock in Oregon. When I hit it with a hammer (several times) it split perfectly in half. In the middle there was what appeared to be a seed - about the size, shape, and color of an apple seed. The rock had all these "carpels" or "rays", "flakes" coming out from the center. I sanded one half of the inside of the rock. I did not sand the outside. The outside is very hard. The inside is sort of flaky. The outside could not be scratched with a fingernail or coin. Acid did not make the rock fizz or do anything. Someone thought it might be a concretion but I d
  13. Novice to identifying fossils, if there's a lower rung on the knowledge scale it would probably be more applicable. Found this about 30cm deep in north central West Virginia about 12 miles south of Cumberland MD. Our yard is about 10cm of topsoil and at least a meter of hard packed shale (that's as far down as I've had the pleasure of digging for my projects). I've found other similar items but this one split to show the interior which caught my interest.
  14. hndmarshall

    Petrified Fruit?

    I had purchased a box of fossils and it was chocked full of goodies but there were two that no matter how hard I searched could not find online. I did however find this group. I am hoping someone here can identify them. I took pics of the largest one will try to get better pics I also studied it with a microscopic camera and snapped a few pics. As you can see it has a fruit shape and a stem. pics one and two are nice clear pics...Pic 3 shows where it was eaten off of by something? the white part is crystallized. I have included a microscopic pic of the stem Thu Aug 30 2
  15. Baddadcp

    Pseudo or other?

    I have been looking at this and can't decide if it's something or not. I leave it to the experts. Personally I thought concretion until I saw the belt. It looks like a squashed acorn, but I don't believe there were oaks in Lower Cretaceous. Thoughts? No, it's not a human artifact.
  16. Dpaul7

    Unidentified fossil fruit

    Hello! I received this fossil from a friend - He could not remember the NAME of the fruit - only that it is agatized fruit, from Queensland, Australia, and that it is a bit scarce. Can anyone give an idea? It looks a bit "squashed" - but very interesting! Thanks for looking!
  17. KimTexan

    Fruiting body?

    I found this a while back in the lower Cretaceous. I'm not sure what it is. It looks like a fruit of some sort. I've never found anything like it. Mostly what I find are ammonites, gastropods, bivalves, brachiopods, corals and such. I have not totally cleaned it up, because I found these little nibs on the surface and I'm not sure if they're part of the structure or not. Also what I think is the top or stem area is very tough and I'd hate to ruin some fine feature if it's there. I'd like to know what it is supposed to look like before I finish it off. I'm a novice so I don't really
  18. C.M. Eck

    Possible petrified apple

    This was found years ago by my mother in the Ozarks of Missouri in southeast Missouri, on the st. Francois river. Has been around me since I can remember. Any help would be appreciated.
  19. Quigi

    Fruit or Egg?

    Hi, I found this along a cliff side region on the north shore of Lake Erie where I've also found many specimens from around the Devonian period (different bracheopod species, horn coral, plants and a several others that I will post on this site later). It was found in a ravine about 10 meters down from the surface level but around 20 meters from lake level. Thanks for any help that can be offered!
  20. painshill

    Fossil Fruit?

    Here’s the item mentioned on another thread concerning fossil fruits. It’s in a nodule about half an inch thick and from the Kem Kem formations of the Moroccan Sahara. It was claimed to be “a fruit”, but I have no idea. It’s not the easiest thing to photograph, but here’s some pics taken under different lighting conditions of both the positive and negative halves: Positives: Negatives: Any ideas?.... Any ideas if you squinch your eyes really hard?
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