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  1. Hello again. I saw this tooth on the internet, I don't know what dinosaur it could be from. In the description of the publication it does not say anything, only that it is from the theropod and from the United States. I suspect it is from a tyrannosaurid, but which one? I don't know. Gorgosaurus? or T rex? There is no further information on the origin or training where it was obtained. What do you think it could be? I know that with so little data not much can be done, but I would like to know the opinions or suggestions that you have on this ma
  2. I have here five Therapod teeth from the Judith River Formation of Hill County, Montana. Four are partials, and one is a small and complete. They were identified as Tyrannosaurs, but I'm wondering if that's accurate, and if it's possible to narrow them down further. It's probably a long shot, but I felt it would be useful to ask here where there are many more knowledgeable about theropods than I am. I've offered different angles, sizes, and serration counts. Thank you, Bellamy
  3. Hi everyone, So I came across a tooth that says this tooth comes from a carnivore (Gorgosaur/Daspletosaur), is 3.81 cm in length. The seller is a Daspletosaurus, but you know, before buying anything I have to ask your opinion. It was found in the Two Medicine Formation. There was a debate as to whether it was either a Gorgosaurus or a Daspletosaurus. So the questions are: Is it a Daspletosaurus or a Gorgosaurus? In what condition it is?
  4. Hi All I am open to trading my following theropod teeth. I have attached a couple of images of each teeth along with info on the size and locality etc. Please PM me for more info and images/offers if interested. EDIT - I am after other theropod teeth in return Paul
  5. Hello. I was wondering if anyone could help me identify this tyrannosaur tooth I recently added to my collection. It is said to be from the Judith River formation in North-Central Montana. Unfortunately, I don't have the county it came from. The tooth has the following measurements. Thanks for your help. CH = 40 mm CWB = 10 mm CBL = 16 mm MC = 18 denticles/5 mm DC = 14 denticles/5 mm DSDI = 1.29
  6. Top Trilo

    Tyrannosaur tooth ID

    I bought this tyrannosaur tooth a while back and it says it’s a albertosaurus, gorgosaurus, or daspletosaurus. Is there anyway to narrow it down any further? It says it was found in the Judith river formation of eastern Montana and it measures just over an inch. Any and all help is appreciated.
  7. dinosaur man

    My largest dinosaur tooth yet

    I just got this and it will be arriving soon, It will be my largest dinosaur tooth yet once It comes. It’s a Tyrannosaur indet for now and it’s from the Judith River Formation. Just wanted to share this. I wanted to share more information compared to my other topic.
  8. dinosaur man

    DSDI between 0.8 and 1.2

    Hi I have a question, I went back since I had some time and re measured my Tyrannosaur tooth denticles. But there both the same size, the Mesial and Distal are both 6. And the DSDI is 1, what would this mean? Thank you!! @Omnomosaurus, @Troodon
  9. Hi I decided to make this since the new Tyrannosaur from Alberta’s Foremost Formation, Thanatotheristes deerootorum has just been named and described. Enjoy!! Tyrannosaur bearing Formations in Canada: Formations in Alberta but most of the Formations on my list are I Alberta anyway. Horseshoe Canyon Formation 74-68 million years ago, Alberta: Albertosaurus sarcophagus, possibly Daspletosaurus sp. but no compelling evidence so far. Oldman Formation 78.2-77 million years ago, Alberta: Daspletosaurus torosus, Gorgosaurus sp. Foremost
  10. Wow its already the 17 of January where has the year gone? Well always time for some cool photos of some great fossils to keep us going Its not unheard of to find dinosaur bite marks on a fossil. This Triceratops pelvis on display at Museum of the Rockies has Tyrannosaurus bite marks on it (red arrows) One way to identify a theropod bone is to see if they are hollow, another way is to look at their vertebra most are pneumatized, have a honeycomb structure. Here is an example of a T rex vertebra You hear alot about the Nanot
  11. This report is a bit late, but better late than never! During late July through to mid August 2018 i was on a research trip to study a new Canadian dinosaur footprint site for my Masters degree project. I am based in Australia, and this was the first time i had been to Canada! So of course i had to make the most of it and pay a visit to the world renowned Dinosaur Provincial Park in southern Alberta, arguably the richest site in the world for dinosaur fossils. The park is the best exposure of the Dinosaur Park Formation (which it is now named after), which dates to about 76.5 million years ago
  12. The Royal Terrell Museum shared a super specimen they collected and prepared of a Gorgosaurus that is the most complete juvenile tyrannosaur specimen discovered in Canada (and possibly even in North America). The Museum of the Rockies gave the skull of Big Al, MOR 693, a much needed acetone bath, new coat of vinac & a new conservation cradle before going back on exhibit. Big Al is one of the most complete Allosaurus specimens in the world! The most complete sauropod specimen known is CM 11338, a juvie Camarasaurus lentus. Courtesy: Saur
  13. Hadrosaur carcasses must have been great hiding places for fishes during the Cretaceous. A beautifully preserved primitive sturgeon, in the belly cavity of a Brachylophosaurus skeleton. Thanks Jack Horner Here’s the holotype skull of Gorgosaurus libratus. This specimen was collected by Charles Sternberg from Dino Prov Park, Alberta & described by Lawrence Lambe, Canada’s first vertebrate palaeontolgist. Thanks Dave Evans Thigh bone and shin bone of a subadult Triceratops. The thigh is much longer than the shin making for a relatively short stride, sug
  14. Gentleman647

    My Collection

    New to collecting and this site, thought I’d debut my small collection in my first post. Any comments or tips would be appreciated.
  15. kinnza1

    Tyrannosaurid Indet Confirmation

    Hello all, Recently acquired 2 teeth, found and sold together, that I would love some insight and second opinions on. Both teeth are described as Tyrannosaurid Indet, from the Judith River Formation. The seller described that he purchased them both together from the harvester, but due to the fact he was not the original collector, the information is isolated to the above information. Smaller tooth is 15/16" long, dark chocolate color, and 1/4" wide. Serrations are present on front and rear edges, with serrations starting midway on the front edge.
  16. dinosaur man

    Strange juvenile gorgosaurus tooth

    On my birthday I got a juvenile gorgosaur tooth didn’t look special other then the colour but then I started to check it out and study it and instead of serrations there were small holes so I came up with a theory how juvenile tyrannosaurs didn’t have serrations until they got older yet I still need more proof to back up my theory but I found it interesting it was collected on a ranch in the Judith River formation not to far from the Canadian border it is 75 million years old here are some photos of it.
  17. A while back, I received a package from our good friend Adam, better known as @Tidgy's Dad. In said package was a small plastic dinosaur that had apparently been gifted to him by none other than @JohnBrewer. This means that this little fella had started his journey in England, made his way to Morocco, and had since travelled to the United States. It was decided after careful consideration that his name was to be Gorgeous George the Globetrotting Gorgosaurus. Now he is traveling the globe spreading joy and cheer to members of TFF! If you are fortunate enough to play host to Gorgeous
  18. I've shown these before replica builds from the Black Hills Institute. This is a Gorgosaurus and all the commentary and photos are from Pete Larsen Begin mounting a cast of the Gorgosaurus nov. sp. the original is at The Childrens Museum of Indianapolis. This is one of my favorite Tyrannosaur skeletons. This one goes to Masashi Tanaka. Making progress on the Gorgosaurus skeleton. Every time I pickup a cast bone to mount I check to see if I missed any pathologies. This was one messed up dinosaur Finished mounting
  19. LordTrilobite

    theropodaexpeditions.com

    I found this website that has some fantastic photos of dinosaur bones. Definitely worth a look. Great for reference. http://www.theropodaexpeditions.com/ Some examples
  20. Troodon

    3D Skull of Gorgosaurus

    Witmer Labs requested the ROM's 3D model of the tyrannosaurid dinosaur Gorgosaurus (ROM 1247) for use in the Smithsonian's NMNH new dinosaur hall. Link attached if your interested in viewing it. https://sketchfab.com/models/bcc4f64edc93403ea006897cbba6da22 Witmer Labs used it as part of our 2009 study of tyrannosaur braincase, brain, ear, & air sinus evolution: The study looked at the braincase of Gorgosaurus, Trex and the Cleveland Nanotyrannus skull. Link is attached. Interesting paper if you have not see it, concluded that the Clevelend Nanotyrannus bra
  21. Wear facets, spalling and split carinae are typical features you see on Tyrannosaurid teeth that add character and mystery to these teeth. Here are two papers that examine these features. Wear Facets Lambe (1917) noted wear surfaces on the side faces of tyrannosaurid lateral teeth from the Red Deer River deposits of western Canada. He wrote “as the upper teeth closed outside those of the mandible any wear, not on the point, would result from the contact of the inner surface of the upper teeth with the outer surface of the lower ones.” Recent work, has, however, chall
  22. Anomotodon

    Judith River Tyrannosaur

    From the album: Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    30 mm nicely preserved tyrannosaur tooth. As I understand, it is impossible to distinguish between Gorgosaurus, Daspletosaurus and Albertosaurus from Judith River Fm.
  23. The Speeding Carno

    Indianapolis Children's Museum

    Hello, I was stopping through Indianapolis and gave their children's museum a try. It was surprisingly enjoyable! The museum covered topics from agriculture to racing to dinosaurs! These photos are from the dinosaur section. I followed the signs to the Dinosphere. I walked through the entrance and down the ramp. At the end of the ramp was a Sarcosuchus cast (no picture sorry). Following the path I emerged into a huge planetarium like structure filled with dinosaurs.
  24. This topic is more up-to-date on North American Tyrannosaurids I find it interesting when I see Tyrannosaurid material for sale, from the Judith River of Montana, that so little is understood of what actually is being offered. Most sellers call their specimen either Daspletosaurus or Albertosaurus and a few, when it comes to teeth, properly identify them as Tyrannosaurid indet. Very few will label anything Gorgosaurus unless it's really small. Yet none of these Tyrannosaurids have been described from this fauna and Albertosaurus may not even be represented. So what
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