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  1. Quriosity

    Green River Formation PDF

    For those interested in the Green River fauna and geology, here's the link to a detailed report by the Wyoming State Geological Survey. http://www.wsgs.wyo.gov/products/wsgs-1984-b-63.pdf It has probably been posted somewhere already on the forum but I didn't find it, so at least it will be here
  2. FossilDudeCO

    Newest Fish Panel

    I just had to show this one off! I saved the Notogoneous from a terrible fate of never being prepped! My buddy thought he was missing part of his head after he roughed it out so he set it aside. Notogoneous is my favourite fish so I took a gamble and had it prepped out, to my surprise it was all there with a wide open mouth! Notogoneous: 24 1/8 inches (61.28cm) Diplomystus: 15 inches (38.10cm) Knightia: 7 inches (17.78cm) Cockerellites (Priscacara): 5 3/4 inches (14.60cm) Entire panel measures 63 1/2 inches (156.21cm) wide by 22 inches (55.
  3. My youngest son goes fossil hunting without me these days and a few years ago he went to the parachute member of the Green River Formation and found some fossil leafs. He asked me the other day if I would do a prep job on a leaf he had found. I said "sure". So, he brought it over and I did some 'prep majic on it. It didn't look too good when I first took a gander at it, but I figured I could get some tips out of it and expose the stem. The more work I did on it the better it got. The bad thing was the leaf itself was not in very good preservation with the rock very discolored around the
  4. TyrannosaurusRex

    Mioplosus eating a Knightia

    I picked up this treasure in Tucson, because I have always wanted one, and had never been able to afford on till then. Species: Mioplosus and Knightia Location: Green River, Wyoming continued....
  5. FossilDudeCO

    Show Layout

    Here it is, the show booth layout! What do yah think? did we get enough fish this year? I am kind of fond of the table, it is fully lit all the way around the inside with LED lights!
  6. FossilDudeCO

    2016 a Recap

    Hello TFF! I just wanted to take a minute to share with everyone some of our finds from 2016. I do most of my digging up in Kemmerer, WY trying my hand at fossil fishes. 2016 was a pretty exceptional year in that along with our standard hundreds of 18" fish and thousands of split fish we pulled 2 VERY LARGE specimens. quite rare really. it averages out to about 1 every 2 or 3 years normally, so 2 in one summer is AMAZING! These panels have all been finished and are ready to hit the market along with the large gar and the croc! Fingers crossed that they sell so we can op
  7. Sagebrush Steve

    Fish Poop?

    I have some fossils from the Green River that I collected several years ago. One of them had a nice full Knightia on it but the matrix was so thick that I decided to split it. When I did, I found these two small lumps on the newly split surface. The one on the right looks like it has bony fragments in it, I was wondering if these were some sort of fish poop. Nothing else shows up on this layer.
  8. Tony G.

    Horsetail

    From the album: Green River Formation. Parachute Creek Member. Douglas Pass, Colorado

    Horsetail. Collected from the Green River Formation. Parachute Creek Member. Douglas Pass, Colorado. Radar Dome location.
  9. From the album: Green River Formation. Parachute Creek Member. Douglas Pass, Colorado

    Unidentified insect from the Green River Formation. Parachute Creek Member. Douglas Pass, Colorado. Radar Dome location. 5/8" across.
  10. AvidArchRival

    Are these scale imprints?

    Hi all, I would like to know if these are scale imprints. Initially I thought they are scales, but after examination under a macro lens, some of the lines lead from the central vertebrate to the dorsal edge, resembling neural spines and are therefore not scales. The specimen is a Knightia, about 3 inches in length. Thanks for any information.
  11. Thanks to Blake(FossilDudeCo), I was able to purchase an unprepped plate back in March to try my hand at my first green river fish. It's been a busy year so it's just been been sitting on my prep table mocking me for the past 8 months. This weekend I finally spent some time working on it. Learned a lot, what works, what really doesn't, and mostly that I now want to get out to the green river formation and go 'fishing' for myself. It's certainly far from perfect and I need to get some carbide needle chisels to clean up details for any I do in the future, but overall I was pretty excited wit
  12. Hello all! I am very pleased to announce that I am sending my first piece of Green River plant material over to Fossil Butte National Monument for them to add to their collections! It has the structure of the leaf down to the third set of veins and should be able to be recognized by genus. This came out of a strange layer between the split fish and the 18 inch at the Lewis Ranch. The layer it comes from consists of mostly Phareodus and Gar. Plant material is fairly uncommon within it, but shows extremely nice preservation. While it is
  13. I got these at the Denver Show, but wasn't provided with any information on them. I know the seller had a numeric species ID list, these were labeled 46, 8 and 9. But that won't help much. I assume these are from the Eocene Green River formation
  14. Tony G.

    Platanus wyomingensis

    Collected South of the Radar Dome near the cliff face.
  15. Sagebrush Steve

    Need help with ID of Green River fossil

    I'm recently retired and finally getting around to sorting through an assortment of fossils I collected on a trip to the Green River in Wyoming about 10 years ago. I dug in the split fish layer at the quarry at Warfield's Fossils. Along with the usual assortment of Knightia, etc., I just came across this fossil that I can't identify. Can someone help?
  16. Tony G.

    Cardiospermum coloradensis

    Collected South of the Radar Dome near the cliff face.
  17. oilshale

    Amia pattersoni GRANDE & BEMIS, 1998

    Lit.: L. Grande: An updated review of the fish faunas from the Green River Formation, the world's most productive freshwater Lagerstaetten. In Eocene biodiversity., unusual occurrences and rarely sampled habitats. Gunell, Gregg F., eds, Topics in Geobiology, Vol 18, p. 1-38. Lance Grande & William E. Bemis (1998) A Comprehensive Phylogenetic Study of Amiid Fishes (Amiidae) Based on Comparative Skeletal Anatomy. an Empirical Search for Interconnected Patterns of Natural History, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 18:S1,1-696, DOI: 10.1080/02724634.1998.10011114
  18. oilshale

    Astephus antiquus (Leidy, 1873)

    Astephus and Hypsidoris are both members of the Family Ictaluridae, native to North America. Green River catfish are easily recognized by their stout dorsal and pectoral spines, scale less bodies and broad skull. Ictalurid species have four pairs of barbels (or whiskers). Like modern catfish, they possessed a vibration sensitive organ called the Weberian apparatus. The Weberian apparatus consists out of specialized vertebrae at the front of the spinal column which passed vibrations to the inner ear using the swim bladder as a resonance chamber. The structure essentially acts as an amplifier o
  19. Astephus and Hypsidoris are both members of the Family Ictaluridae, native to North America. Green River catfish are easily recognized by their stout dorsal and pectoral spines, scale less bodies and broad skull. Ictalurid species have four pairs of barbels (or whiskers). Like modern catfish, they possessed a vibration sensitive organ called the Weberian apparatus. The Weberian apparatus consists out of specialized vertebrae at the front of the spinal column which passed vibrations to the inner ear using the swim bladder as a resonance chamber. The structure essentially acts as an amplifier o
  20. FossilDudeCO

    52MYO Fossil Clock!

    Tick Tock, It's a fossil clock! I didn't know what section to post this in this looks as good as any! This clock is 100% natural! No inlaid fish here! And the numbers were a very unique find...clear evidence of alien visitations 52mya in modern day Wyoming. Now if I can just find the ship.... All jokes aside, let me know what you guys think! Sorry my picture is slightly fuzzy...I don't know why other than I am a TERRIBLE photographer!
  21. mdpaulhus

    Green River Botanicals?

    I have a couple of interesting fossils collected in green river formation. The first is from just below 18" layer and I have been thinking it was a leave, but the form is odd with large dark center section and now I am wondering if it some type of seed or fruit? It is about 3/4" long. Any thoughts? The third photo is of a fossil collected from split fish quarry and it looks like a seed or nut to me (almost similar to a pistachio nut), but perhaps just my imagination and it is some collection of fish parts or other. It does like there is the start of another similar shape just to the
  22. oilshale

    Phareodus sp., juvenile

    Juvenile Phareodus
  23. PRK

    Phareodus sp.

    Detail of skull and teeth of juvenile Phareodus specimen that I collected at Carl Ulrich Quarry back in the early '70s when he used to let visitors collect with him.
  24. This juvenile stingray is an Asterotrygon . The body is covered with denticles and the tail is thicker than that of a normal Heliobatis. References: M. De Carvalho, J. Maisey, L. Grande (2004): Freshwater Stingrays of the Green River Formation of Wyoming with the Description of a new Genus. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 284, 136pp., 53 figures, 7 tables.
  25. Tony G.

    Larvae.JPG

    From the album: Green River Formation. Parachute Creek Member. Douglas Pass, Colorado

    Larvae from Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. Douglas Pass, Colorado.
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