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Found 20 results

  1. Hi everyone, I recently bought this tooth on a whim. It was described as Diplocynodon sp. from the Kimmeridge Clay and reworked into the Albian-age Faringdon Sponge Gravels at the Wicklesham Pit. However, this description is obviously wrong in either species attribution or locality, since Diplocynodon is an alligatoroid genus dating to the Paleocene to middle Miocene, and could therefore not possibly have been found in the Sponge Gravels as Wicklesham Pit. Going by the label that came with the tooth, however, the seller whom I bought the
  2. I recently spent a week on the Isle of Wight, mostly to find fossils. To be honest, the fossils were pretty much a washout for me in many respects. My inexperience, combined with very mild weather and calm seas, meant that I didn't find the dinosaur bone I'd been hoping for. I made much better finds in the local book and charity shops! I did recover some huge pieces of lignite, which seemed to litter every beach I found. This even included some huge logs. I have successfully preserved lignite from other locations, but this stuff is quite pyritic. However, I'm happy to say that I wa
  3. G'day all! After three years since my last visit to the UK, i finally returned in December 2017 for another massive collecting trip across England. This was my most ambitious tour of the UK's Mesozoic and Cenozoic vertebrate deposits thus far, with 20 days of collecting across ten different locations. These were (in chronological order from first visit): Abbey Wood in East London Beltinge in Kent Bouldnor on the Isle of Wight Compton Bay to Grange Chine on the Isle of Wight Lyme Regis to Charmouth in Dorset Aust Cliff in Gloucestershire
  4. Hi, I've just got back from a collecting trip up to Hamstead Ledge this afternoon and came across a fairly rare find that I was hoping someone may be able to help with. It's the distal tarsometatarsus of bird found ex-situ on the foreshore. Bird material from the Bouldnor Fm. tends to be quite rare and this is the first piece I've actually ever come across so was really excited to find it! I was wondering if there were any diagnostic features on the specimen that would be able to take the ID further than "Aves indet.". If anyone has any knowledge of bird material then I'd really a
  5. Hi, It's been a while since I've put anything up on here so it figured it would a good time to share some of my finds from this spring so far. With such a productive winter the start of this spring on the Bouldnor Fm. coast was a bit slow with several trips in which little was found (odd for what is usually a heavily productive site) but as March and April came round the finds started coming in faster and better. Access at Bouldnor is now very dangerous and pretty much impassable due to thick and deep silt and mud which has covered part of the beach (which I found out the hard way
  6. Hi, I thought I'd share some of my finds from what was a pretty good trip up to Bouldnor Cliff on Tuesday morning. This was my first collecting trip in over a month due to tides, being ill over Christmas and being generally busy, so I missed out on most of December. But hopefully I can start getting back into going twice a week again as usual. Low tide was at 09:48 so I decided to head for Bouldnor instead of Hamstead, as it's a lot easier to quickly access. My hope was that the prolonged stormy weather we've had for a couple of weeks now would have brought up some ni
  7. Paleoworld-101

    Claw ID Help - Bouldnor Formation, UK

    Collected recently from Bouldnor on the Isle of Wight. It is about 33 million years old (earliest Oligocene). Fossils of turtles, a small alligatorid (Diplocynodon) and land mammals (most commonly anthracotheres) are the usual finds. This is the first ungual i have ever found from this location, and i am having trouble finding images of other examples to compare with. It measures 18mm long. I first thought crocodile when i collected it, but i would like other opinions. I'm now tossing up between mammalian and crocodilian. I understand going further than that will probably not be p
  8. TXV24

    Bouldnor Cliff Phalange

    Hi, I'm back again with another mammal foot bone from the Bouldnor Formation. I collected this phalanx this afternoon whilst out collecting at Bouldnor Cliff and am having a nightmare trying to identify it. It's asymmetrical and quite 'heavily built' in comparison to your usual anthracothere phalanges which makes me think it might not be Bothriodon. It's slightly damaged around the proximal articulatory surface but other than that is pretty much intact. It's 4.2cm long and 2.1cm wide. I did check Anoplotherium as I remembered it having short compact phalanges and the remains of se
  9. TXV24

    Rodent Incisor

    Lower incisor from the theridmoyid rodent Isoptychus. Collected from a thin lacustrine horizon in the Lower Hamstead Member of the Bouldnor Fm. at Bouldnor Cliff, an early Oligocene locality on the northwest coast of the Isle Of Wight, UK. Identified by mammal specialist Jerry hooker from the Natural History Museum.
  10. Hi, I haven't posted in a while on here so I thought I'd show some of my best Bouldnor Fm. finds from this autumn (so far). As winter comes in the productivity on the coast has noticeably increased since the summer. We've had a lot of wet and windy weather through October and November, especially with Hurricane Ophelia and Storm Brian which has triggered a lot of falls and slips especially at Bouldnor and Hamstead Cliffs producing new material. I've also recently started as a lab volunteer at Dinosaur Isle (mostly accessioning Insect fossils from the Bembridge Insect Beds etc.) wh
  11. Hi, I was out collecting from the Bouldnor Formation on Tuesday as usual and came across this piece of bone on the foreshore west of Cranmore. I initially thought it may have been part of a vertebra, but from what I can tell after looking at it further I think it may be part of the occipital bone/nuchal ridge (not sure on the proper name for this region of the skull so please correct me if I'm wrong) from the back of a mammal skull, as I can see an area that may be the beginning of a sagittal crest. The specimen is damaged in some areas and has clearly been broken off from a large
  12. TXV24

    Hamstead Vertebra

    Hi, Sorry I haven't been that active on here recently for the last few weeks, I've been incredibly busy. I've made a few trips to Hamstead over the past few weeks (I'll post some of the highlights later) and have just got back from a very wet and windy trip today, which as usual did not disappoint. The most interesting find of the day, along with a snake vertebra and an anthracothere premolar, was this fairly intact vertebra. My initial thoughts were perhaps crocodilian or mammalian but it looks very different from any Diplocynodon vertebra I've ever found, and I can't find a matc
  13. Hi, I officially finished school forever on Monday so to celebrate my new fangled freedom I decided to spend an afternoon and evening collecting along the Hamstead to Bouldnor coast, so I thought I'd show some of the highlights from the trip. We had very strong winds and some rain here last week so I figured that the beach conditions would be good for collecting, and the Bouldnor Fm. didn't disappoint. I reached the beach at Hamstead point around 1:30pm, and the spring tide was the highest I'd ever seen it. The tide was technically going out but along this coast the tide doesn't a
  14. Hi, A few weeks back I posted in the ID section about a fragment of mammal molar I had found whilst collecting at Hamstead. The Hamstead to Bouldnor coast is an Eocene/Oligocene locality and one the best sites in the UK for tertiary vertebrate remains from crocodiles, turtles, fish, and quite frequently mammals too, and was deposited in a paludal environment in the Hampshire Basin. I was aware it was a fragment of a rhinoceros tooth but couldn't be sure if it was from a more modern Pleistocene type like Stephanorhinus or a much more older rhinocerotid like Ronzotherium, an early h
  15. Hi, I thought I'd share some of my best finds from my trip to Hamstead earlier today. Today was my first collecting trip there in almost a month due to the living hell most British 18 year olds have to endure, commonly called, A level exams. As my exams are starting to wind down and finish next week, along with my entire school career (I'm nearly free!) I thought I'd head up there and do some collecting to get back into the swing of things for the summer. We've had a long period of very hot, calm, and still weather here in southern England, and that coupled with the recent influx
  16. Hi, I thought I'd share some of my nicest finds from recent trips up to Hamstead in the past two or so weeks. The tides have changed now in the western solent so I wasn't able to get out for as long as I usually am able to this weekend, (only 10am - 1pm instead of 7am to 4pm) so I didn't manage to find as much as usual. However, we've had a lot of periods of wet and windy conditions followed by warm and dry weather, which has brought down some areas of the cliffs and really churned up the sediments and seabed bringing a fair amount of material (the other week I came back with near
  17. TXV24

    Mystery molar from Hamstead

    Hi, Haven't been on here for a while as I've been quite busy lately but I managed to get out collecting yesterday at my usual spot along the coast at Hamstead. Whilst I was collecting I came across this fragment of a fossil molar washed up on the beach. From the look of it I'd tentatively say that it's from the Pleistocene gravels (which can be found along most of the cliff tops and offshore), however a lot of the Eocene/Oligocene material can also appear to be quite young and in good condition. To me it resembles a fragment of rhinoceros or elephant tooth, but at the same time it
  18. TXV24

    Hamstead Trip

    Hi, I thought I'd share some of my best finds from yesterday's trip to Hamstead. It was definitely one of the best trips I've had in terms of the sheer number and variety of fossils I picked up. Tide was going out slowly so had to spend a lot of time climbing over and through the fallen trees that litter the beach from the landslides, but it was definitely worth it. As usual fragments of Emys carapace were by far the most common find along with loads of worn pieces of crocodile scute and fish vertebrae. I also found quite a few of the nicer pieces that come out of the Bouldnor for
  19. TXV24

    Hamstead Mammal Calcaneum

    Hi, Had a very wet and windy trip to Hamstead this morning and amongst the usual finds of crocodile, turtle, and fish I stumbled upon this large and fairly unworn piece of a mammal calcaneum (fairly unworn for hamstead) at the base of a mudslide on the foreshore. The cuboid is missing and so is the rest of the calcaneum but apart from that the articulatory processes are almost intact. It's somewhat larger than the calcaneum I found a few weeks back (posted up on here), which was later identified as anthracothere by my local museum (so most likely Bothriodon), the articulatory proc
  20. Hi, I'm Theo I'm new to the forum (I'll properly introduce myself on the introductions pages) and I've been collecting from the Oligocene beds on the north east coast of the Isle Of Wight for some years now. Yesterday afternoon whist collecting on the coast at Hamstead I came across this bone on the foreshore. I can tell it's a calcaneus bone and my initial thought was a mammal but I'm not sure. (I also stumbled upon some quite nice Bothriodon? incisors). Any help in identifying the calcaneus would be much appreciated. Thanks, Theo
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