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  1. Hi all, thanks to @Troodon and his wonderful guidance I felt confident to purchase my first fossil claw. Now after thorough cleaning and proper documentation I wanted to get your input on a possible ID. The claw was found in the Hell Creek Fm., Garfield County, Montana. It's 1,82 cm (0.72'') in length and as you can see some of the tip is missing. The ventral surface is a bit flat so I guess it's not a Dromaeosaurid, but it also does not look like Anzu to me, but I am a claw-novice. Thanks for taking a look!
  2. Hi all, I could not resist and took another shot on my quest to obtain a Dakotaraptor tooth. Here the tooth in question this time: It was found in the Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County. Measurements are: CH 1,41 cm - CBL 0,68 cm - CBW 0,3 cm - denticles per 5mm are 22 mesial and 19 distal. Note the slight tilt of the denticles towards the tip of the tooth. It's the best fit I have found so far, what deviates from the dePalma description is the shape of the base, it has a pinch, but I would not consider it rectangular. As a side note, it looks exactly like the base of Acheroraptor
  3. I urge caution to all collectors buying or trading from dealers, diggers or fellow collectors. Most collectors, diggers or dealers are honest and trustworthy but not all have a firm handle on identification and I'm seeing this situation worsening not improving. Its not easy even for paleontologists who are trained. I include collectors because like myself, have over the years, been sold misidentified material. So dont trust anything you see offered to you and get it verified. Here is just a sampling of a few items I've run across. Provenance is very important in identi
  4. Edmontosaurus annectens may have been the largest dinosaur in the Hell Creek/Lance Formations not T rex. Here is an article that gets into the specifics. https://thesauropodomorphlair.wordpress.com/2021/02/10/size-of-the-duck-titans/
  5. There are two Tyrannosaurs described in the Hell Creek & Lance Formations, Tyrannosaurus rex and Nanotyrannus lancensis. Teeth from these animals are the number one sought after and coveted item by collectors. I don't understand all the hoopla and prices they command since my friends who I collect with know that I'm not a tooth person and prefer bones and claws. However I've been fortunate to find and acquire a few teeth and will post a several of my nicer ones. My two most favorite T-rex teeth are my biggest and smallest: The Baby (one of the rarest teeth around) is 1 1/8" and w
  6. The virus put a damper on my Spring dinosaur collecting trip but I was able to get a partial one in for the Fall. I was able to spend several days at my usual Edmontosaurs bonebed but unfortunately only one day at a channel deposit in Montana where theropod/mammal material can be found. Hopefully next year will be more normal, Hopefully. Quite a few new members since my last trip so I will get into more specifics to get them a view of how I collect this material. First let me share with you a view of the collecting area and the LOCAL wildlife that we deal with on a
  7. For Pachycephalosaurid lovers this paper documents the morphology & ontogeny from +20 specimens of Sphaerotholus buchholtzae. It also evaluates the systematics to show that it's a distinct and valid genus in the Hell Creek Formation along with Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis. https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/zoolinnean/zlaa179/6125117
  8. Squirrelman91

    Hell Creek Claw ID - Dakotaraptor?

    Hi everyone! I have a large claw from the Hell Creek Formation of Harding County, South Dakota that I was hoping to have help identifying. It is large enough that I initially believed it stood a chance at being tyrannosaurid, but it seems a bit more compressed than tyrannosaur claws I’ve worked with in the past - particularly on the lower ridge. The ventral surface of the claw is also distinctly flat rather than rounded, which seems unusual. Could this be a Dakotaraptor claw or is that just wishful thinking? Large Anzu perhaps? It is right around 1.75 inches across the length of the claw (sorr
  9. Hi all, I came across this Ceratopsian tooth from the HC Fm. online and was wondering what you make of the 'wear facet' on the root? Did this occur naturally in the jaw while the tooth got disposed of? I have not seen this before so I am curious Thanks in advance!
  10. Calcanay

    Hell Creek vertebra

    Hello! I got this dinosaur vertebra from Hell Creek (Montana) a few years back. It was sold to me as a Triceratops vertebra but I don't know how that ID was made. It's not in the best condition (has moss(?) on it and has been broken and then glued back together) but it is about 13-14 centimetres across so it is clearly from a big dinosaur, but there were plenty of those in Hell Creek (even two large ceratopsids - Triceratops and Torosaurus). Looking for any insight into how an ID could be made here and if Triceratops (or even just ceratopsid) is correct
  11. ThePhysicist

    T. rex posterior dentary tooth

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A high-quality replica of Stan's posterior right dentary tooth. About 4.5" in length.
  12. ThePhysicist

    Nanotyrannus serrations

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Distal serrations of a juvenile Nanotyrannus lancensis (Hell Creek Fm., Dawson Co., MT).
  13. I see a lot of misunderstanding on what is being sold online at auctions and dealers sites. Some have it correct but most mix up the terminology. So here is Anky 101 aimed at Novice collectors and I will keep it simple. What you see sold in most markets are teeth from late Cretaceous North American locations mostly Montana, Wyoming and the Dakota's so I will focus on those areas. (Hell Creek, Lance, Two Medicine and Judith River Formations) Teeth from Canadian locations will have similar characteristics. There are two basic families of armored dinosaurs in these regions Ankylosauri
  14. ThePhysicist

    Baby Tyrannosaurus rex Tooth

    Identification: Originally listed as a Dromaeosaurid tooth, I suspected it was from a Tryannosaurid. Upon receiving the tooth, I contacted a few paleontologists to get expert opinions. Their conclusion was that the tooth was likely from a baby/juvenile Tyrannosaur. Since the only Tyrannosaurs in the Hell Creek Formation are Tyrannosaurus rex and Nanotyrannus lancensis (or only T. rex if N. lancensis is a young T. rex), and considering the cross-section of the base of the tooth, this must be from a baby Tyrannosaurus rex. This tooth shares many qualities with adult teeth, a fact which
  15. ThePhysicist

    K-Pg Boundary Microtektites

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    K-Pg Boundary Microtektites Hell Creek Formation Garfield Co., MT, USA These aren't fossils, but are relevant to the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs, pterosaurs, large marine reptiles, and many other species of flora/fauna at the end of the Cretaceous. When a large meteor/asteroid struck the earth ~ 66 mya, it sent molten ejecta across the world. Some of this molten material, sourced from the impact site, was shaped by its trajectory through the atmosphere and cooled into small, glassy droplets. The black blobs you see are those droplets, called tektites
  16. From the album: Dinosaurs

    A juxtaposition of the bases of two juvenile Tyrannosaurid tooth crowns from the Hell Creek Formation. Nanotyrannus: Dawson Co., MT Tyrannosaurus: Carter Co., MT
  17. Every few years we get rewarded with a new dinosaur described from the Lance/Hell Creek Formations. In this crazy year we finally have one. Finally an Alvarezsauridae has been described from the Hell Creek Formation: Trierarchuncus prairiensis. Sorry its paywalled cannot make comments https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667120302469 Here is some info on this very different dinosaur, one of my favorites, including some of my material so you can see what the paper is describing. Far better than what you see in the paper
  18. This work by Denver Fowler reviews the stratigraphy of the Hell Creek Formation, as currently understood using the Fort Peck as his study area https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/10/11/435
  19. The skull of any dinosaur is composed of many different elements. When I go collecting in an Edmontosaurus bonebed one never finds a skull but the elements that make up one up. Like to use this topic to share the complexity and variety of some of the elements I have collected. I do not have many but will post the ones I have and will continue to add as I prep or find them. Of course if anyone sees any discrepancies please feel to comment and like to thank Olof (LordTrilobite) in the ID of some. Skull still in a jacket not from my usual bonebed but one can see it all together
  20. Paleostoric

    Richardoestesia or Dakotaraptor?

    Hi everyone, I just got this tooth from the Hell Creek Formation of Carter County, Montana. It was labeled as Richardoestesia, so based on the curvature, I was assuming the proper ID would be cf Richardoestesia gilmorei. However, when taking some measurements, what caught my eye was that the mesial carina appeared to end 1/3 from the base, and I started to wonder if instead this tooth could possibly be Dakotaraptor. These are the measurements I was able to get: Mesial: around 5.5-6 serrations/mm Distal: around 5 serrations/mm CH: around 16.5 mm CBL: aroun
  21. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Nanotyrannus lancensis

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A tooth from a juvenile Nanotyrannus lancensis. Only missing the very tip.
  22. ThePhysicist

    Edmontosaurus annectens

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Hadrosaurs evolved very interesting teeth and complex mastication. Read "Complex Dental Structure and Wear Biomechanics in Hadrosaurid Dinosaurs:" https://science.sciencemag.org/content/338/6103/98
  23. I was very happy to see that recent publication that finally described the youngest known alvarezsurid Trierarchuncus prairiensis from the Hell Creek Formation. Material is rare but is most commonly overlooked and described as Croc or unknown theropod so knowing what to look for helps. I'm constantly on the lookout for this material and have been for years and have been fortunate to either find it or be able to acquire it over time. I used publications of other Alvarezsauridae like the Asian Mononykus and Canadian Albertonykus to help in the identification of my specimens.
  24. Updated 1/17/20 I've taken a pretty firm position on the validity of Nanotyrannus ever since I spent some time looking at the Dueling Dinosaurs shortly after they were discovered. Subsequent to that, new information that I've become aware of just cemented my position. I'm interested in understanding the "truth" and have no problem looking at all available specimens that are in private hands or museums. The optics are very clear to me and I have difficulty understanding the debate. Collectors need to form their own opinion on this but I would like to share with you why I beli
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