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  1. Two Tyrannosaurid teeth that I ordered early this week has arrived. This is the first tooth that I want to show, which is a tooth of a juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex (or Nanotyrannus). Since I personally believe that the Nanotyrannus is an invalid genus, I think this is a juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex tooth. For those who do not agree, this is a Nanotyrannus tooth. This tooth is from Hell Creek formation of Garfield Co. Montana. This is an 1-3/8 inch, and has some chips and scratches at the labial side, but I think this is still a great tooth.
  2. ThePhysicist

    Triceratops prorsus

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Triceratops prorsus Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD, USA This is a nice tooth with great enamel, partially rooted, and has some feeding wear (which I enjoy). It does have some repair/consolidation. Usually, Ceratopsian teeth are indistinguishable from each other. In HC, Torosaurus and Triceratops (currently) are the valid genera. However, the company operating on the ranch where this tooth was found has only found T. prorsus skulls in the 30+ years they've been there. This tooth, being found in the same deposit, therefore has a good probability of bein
  3. ThePhysicist

    T. prorsus feeding wear

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A Triceratops tooth from the Hell Creek Fm., Harding Co., SD.
  4. I want to share a nice Astragalus of an Edmontosaurus, from Tooth Draw Quarry, Hell Creek Formation, South Dakota. According to the shape of the fossil, I guess this is from left leg of the Edmontosaurus.
  5. FF7_Yuffie

    Hell Creek Radius - Edmontosaurus

    Hello, This fossil caught my eye as one to buy. It is described as a radius--23 inches long. Seller doesn't know the species, but speculates it could be theropod. Am I right in thinking it is actually Edmontosaurus? It is from Hell Creek, Montana -- near the town of Jordan. I did a bit of looking, and 23 inches seems far too big for any of the Hell Creek theropods. Edmontosaurus radius bones look around the same length--a google search shows some previously sold which were around 20 inches plus. The weight is just under 6lbs. So, am I correct
  6. Hi, Now, this is the worst for wear, but if it is as described, I figure it's my best chance to get a triceratops horn for a price that is in my budget---since I've seen full ones go for thousands, I'd never afford one.. And even though it's a bit battered, it seems repairable to a degree---the top part seems like it can repaired, as does the bit connecting to the skull, but it is missing a chunk of the middle section unfortunately. I So, is it as described--a Triceratops horn, or something else that resembled a horn? It was found in Western South Dakota, Hell Creek. De
  7. FF7_Yuffie

    Hell Creek "theropod" vertebra

    Hello, I'm tempted by one of these verts I saw for sale. All labelled as Hell Creek theropod. Each is from Powder River County in Montana. There are 4 verts, some look similar, so I'll try and do 4 different posts. They are quite small, and most show a honeycomb type texture--which I think is a sign that they are carnivore? I am guessing, given the small size, that these would all be from one of the raptor species from Hell Creek. EDIT: It automatically merged them. Hope its clear which is which. Vert 1 - 2 inch long, 1.75 wide, 2.25 tall
  8. FF7_Yuffie

    Hell Creek bones

    Hello, What are the thoughts on these two bones. No positive id given or a county more specific than Hell Creek Montana and said as possibly a toe bone. There are two bones. The first one has a bunch of photos and is approximately 2cm long. The 2nd one only has just two photos --- is number 2 the end of a metatarsal? Number 2 is approximately 3 cm long. Sorry there's not much more info on location. Thanks for the help
  9. ThePhysicist

    Hell Creek theropod bones?

    Hi, y'all. Here are a couple of dinosaur rib sections from Hell Creek (Harding Co., SD). Does the spongey interior indicate theropod, or are these simply chunkosaurian? Bone 1: Bone 2:
  10. ThePhysicist

    Hell Creek cervical rib?

    Hi y'all. I bought a lot of fragmentary, unidentified dinosaur rib bones from Hell Creek, Harding Co., SD. I didn't buy them for this bone in particular, but once in-hand, it caught my eye and I wondered if it was identifiable since it had a more unique shape. This of course may be wishful thinking, and I'm fine with it remaining unidentifiable. My primary guess is it being the proximal end of a Tyrannosaur cervical rib. I referenced Brochu (2002) "Osteology of Tyrannosaurus rex: Insights from a Nearly Complete Skeleton and High- Resolution Comp
  11. Walter Stein's paper on the 15 study of the Tooth Draw Quarry in South Dakota. He is not issuing a press release, so has asked for it to be shared with any who might learn, benefit or enjoy. The Paleontology, Geology and Taphonomy of the Tooth Draw Deposit; Hell Creek Formation (Maastrictian), Butte County, South Dakota. ThePaleontologyGeologyandTaphonomyoftheToothDrawDepositHellCreekFm.ButteCountySD-Stein2021.pdf
  12. FF7_Yuffie

    Hell Creek vertebra

    Hello, Can someone take a look at this and give your thoughts? I bought it without getting it ID'd because of it's ridiculously low price--if I waited to get it ID'd it would have probably been snapped up. So, figured it was worth a buy now, id later. Anyway, it is sold as been "dinosaur vertebra" from Hell Creek, Montana. I think it is Edmontosaurus because of the heart-shaped centrum--others online seem to have that shape to them. I was wondering if it might also be a Thescelosaurus vertebra given the small size, but most of them I see seem to have more rounded centru
  13. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex Tooth

    Identification: This tooth was sold as being from a Dromaeosaur. The serrations' shape and their similarity on both carinae say otherwise. In the Hell Creek Formation, there are potentially two Tyrannosaur species. If Nanotyrannus is invalid, then this is automatically a T. rex tooth. For those who consider Nanotyrannus to be valid, this tooth is still T. rex based on the robustness of the tip and serrations, and the CHR (Crown Height Ratio). Tyrannosaurus maxillary teeth may still have minor basal compression, as this one does. This is from a juvenile animal based on its small
  14. ThePhysicist

    Avisaurus archibaldi

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A Cretaceous bird tooth (avian dinosaur). ~ 4 mm in height.
  15. Hello, seen another tooth, this time it is a fragment of the tip, according to the seller, it is from the Hell Creek Formation, South Dakota. Sorry for the poor quality of the images, but I'm uploading them from my cell phone. As soon as I can, I will replace them with better quality ones. I would appreciate any comments from you.
  16. FF7_Yuffie

    Richardoestesia teeth?

    From a seller I'm gonna buy a pair of verts from. If these are Richardoestesia, I'll add them to the order. Two teeth from Hell Creek, Powder River County. 1.5 cm. The one on the left seems hollow, is this nornal for Richardoestesia teeth?
  17. charlie3425

    Triceratops?

    Hi everyone, I recently bought this 'Triceratops' vert from Hell Creek online. But on receiving it, I have doubts. I might consider it to be an Edmontosaurus vert. It is not that heart shaped and thicker than a Ceratopsian I figure. What are your thoughts? Dimensions: 12,5cm (h), 9cm (w), 7cm (d) - weight +/- 700 grams More pics needed? Thank you!
  18. ThePhysicist

    Hell Creek Tyrannosaur Denticle Variation

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Comparison of Tyrannosaur denticles (serrations) from the Hell Creek Formation. All of the images are set to the same scale Some differences are likely associated with position in the mouth and/or feeding wear. So, this may not be a perfect illustration of purely ontogenetic variation. The adult T. rex denticles are from an unknown position and carina (being from a tooth fragment), the juvenile T. rex denticles are from the distal carina of a right (rear?) maxillary tooth, and the infant T. rex denticles are from the distal carina of a posterior tooth. The Nanotyrannus
  19. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex tooth tip

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Formation Garfield Co., MT, USA Note: From the right maxillary of a juvenile animal, but still has adult qualities like a robust tip and denticles.
  20. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex mesial serrations

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Formation Garfield Co., MT, USA Note: Juvenile animal
  21. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex distal serrations

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Formation Garfield Co., MT, USA Note: Juvenile animal
  22. doushantuo

    Hell Creek stratigraphy

    The Hell Creek Formation, Montana: A Stratigraphic Review and Revision Based on a Sequence Stratigraphic Approach Denver Fowler Geosciences 2020, 10(11), 435; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10110435 LINK size:approx. 36 mB
  23. I have here three verts from the Hell Creek of Harding County, South Dakota. They were sold as dinosaur. I'm wondering if it's possible to narrow it down further than that. This one is 2.13" long and 1.89" wide
  24. PaleoNoel

    Interesting Hell Creek Vertebra

    Hi everyone, I found this little, mostly complete vertebra in the Hell Creek formation of South Dakota in 2019. I don't really know what to make of it as it's very porous, and amphiplatyan (flat on both sides), although I'm not sure how much of that could be attributable to wear. I believe it's safe to cross of squamate (due to lack of concavity) and champsosaur (overall shape) off the list. While most of the crocodilian verebrae I have found in the hell creek have have a convex and concave end, I am aware that some can be found that are flat sided. The porosity of the bone makes me hopeful th
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