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Found 19 results

  1. There's a new fossil ungulate-related article available online if anyone is interested: Nicolás R. Chimento; Federico L. Agnolin (2020). Phylogenetic tree of Litopterna and Perissodactyla indicates a complex early history of hoofed mammals. Scientific Reports 10 (1): Article number 13280. doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70287-5. The perissodactyl affinities of litopternans have been previously suggested by DNA-based analyses, but the paper by Chimento and Agnolin is the first morphology-based cladistic analysis to support a relationship between Perissodactylia and Litopterna. Mo
  2. cricetid and arvicolid rodents of the California Wash local fauna,Late Blancan of the San Pedro valley,Arizona Cristiana Mezzabotta 2015_Mezzabotta_224.pdf Palaeovertebrata,Montpellier/v.26,1-4,1997
  3. here A new microvertebrate assemblage from the Mussentuchit Member, Cedar Mountain Formation: insights into the paleobiodiversity and paleobiogeography of early Late Cretaceous ecosystems in western North America Haviv M. Avrahami, Terry A. Gates, Andrew B. Heckert, Peter J. Makovicky, Lindsay E. Zanno PeerJ 6:e5883 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.5883 about 11 MB
  4. doushantuo

    marine moo-ing no more

    Humberto Astibia, Aitor Payros, Xabier Pereda Suberbiola, Javier Elorza, Ana Berreteaga , Nestor Etxebarria, Ainara Badiola,Josep Tosquella Sedimentology and taphonomy of sirenian remains from the Middle Eocene of the Pamplona Basin (Navarre, western Pyrenees) Facies (2005) 50:463–475 AstibiaeocenpyreneesirenmammaFACIEStal2005a.pdf
  5. Gelfo, J.N., Goin, F.J., Bauza, N., and Reguero, M., 2019. The fossil record of Antarctic land mammals: commented review and hypotheses for future research. Advances in Polar Science. 30(3): 251-273 doi: 10.13679/j.advps.2019.0021 (open access) http://www.aps-polar.org/paper/2019/30/03/A190814000002 PDF: http://www.aps-polar.org/paper/2019/30/03/A190814000002/full Gelfo, J.N., López, G.M. and Santillana, S.N., 2017. Eocene ungulate mammals from West Antarctica: implications from their fossil record and a new species. Antarctic Science, 29(5),
  6. The Amateur Paleontologist

    New update from the Cretaceous of Romania :)

    Hey everyone - hope you're all well Wanted to share this (in part cause I'm half Romanian ).. It's a conference poster presenting some recent research findings regarding a productive vertebrate microsite from the Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous) of Hatzeg Basin (Romania). It reports some new micro-vertebrate material, including crocodile teeth, lil' bones and even eggshell. Voicu, Vasile & Csiki-Sava (2018). The Cretaceous Swamp just gets bigger: new data on the faunal composition of the Pui Swamp microvertebrate bonebed, Maastrichtian of the Haţeg Basin. The Tenth Intern
  7. doushantuo

    something in the way it moved

    ajslocomeigenshmathemaquantmethodrose93.11Macleod.pdf Norman Macleod and Kenneth D.Rose: Inferring locomotor behavior in Paleogene mammals via eigenshape analysis American Journal of Science,v.293-A,1993 Given that the Paleogene was a time of incipient mammal diversification...
  8. Rahmat_phocarnivmammamarinel_2017_New_Miocene_Monachinae_from_the_Chesapeake_Bay.pdf Vestnik zoologii, 51(3): 221–242, 2017 NEW MIOCENE MONACHINAE FROM THE WESTERN SHORE OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY (MARYLAND, USA) S. J. Rahmat¹*, I. A. Koretsky¹, J. E. Osborne², A. A. Alford² species decribed:Terranectes,Leptophoca,mostly postcranial material about 2,4 Mb ->urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:F727C8DF-EE1F-4A99-8EA5-647859C72E58 outtake:
  9. Foozil

    Dasyurus sp. (Quoll) left maxilla

    Could belong to either Dasyurus viverrinus (Eastern Quoll), D. maculatus (Tiger Quoll) or D. geoffroii (Western Quoll).
  10. doushantuo

    Mesozoic ichnodiversity of Africa

    About 3,4 Mb,and,as such things go,fairly new Kleipl3vmam_Juras_cret_P3P.pdf Useful?Innerestin'?
  11. Hello! Interning archaeologist, and we don't have fossils on hand for a comparison collection! I came across this partial tooth in a bag of faunal material. Could anyone help me out? I'm not familiar with fossil fauna, but I know this was some sort of grazer. Width is about half an inch. Much appreciated!
  12. Gen. et sp. indet.

    a bone

    I found this is southern Poland today. I suppose it is a recent or sub-fossil bone (Pleistocene-Holocene) of a mammal. I'm guessing a proximal tibia of Bovinae. Can you confirm/detail/correct?
  13. doushantuo

    Horsing around:the next installment

    some of you might like this NB:large download NB 2: an oldie outtakes,to convince doubters:
  14. doushantuo

    mermaids,manatees,marine mammals

    Sirenian feeding trace: anand_16.pdf
  15. Hey all, yesterday my wife (CCNHM collections manager Sarah Boessenecker) and I wrote about some of our recent finds from Folly Beach, SC. Collecting fossils there is quite easy, and if you're there for non-shark teeth, there's essentially no competition since that's all anyone ever looks for there. The fossils of Folly Beach have never been written up, and I'm getting more and more curious about them - particularly fossil marine mammals. If anyone finds marine mammal earbones out there, I'm dying to take a look! We've already gotten a nice donation from Ashby Gale, Edisto SP range
  16. PleistoGuy

    Metapod (?) ID

    Hello there! I need your help. I've collected this two in a late Pleistocene conglomerate. This "quarry" has yielded only rancholabrean fauna, horses, mammoth, bison, etc. But I cannot ID this two metacarpals/metatarsals (?)... Can you help me? *The scalebar is on cm. Lateral view Volar(?) view Palmar(?) view
  17. a book review of: Beasts of Eden: Walking Whales, Dawn Horses, and Other Enigmas of Mammal Evolution by David Rains Wallace. University of California Press. 2004. It is always great to see a new paleontology book at my local bookstore. It is especially intriguing when it concerns a group of organisms other than dinosaurs, the subject of the vast majority of them. "Beasts of Eden" is about the evolution of mammals but with a twist. The author, David Rains Wallace, chose to approach the science through art. He uses two famous murals by Rudolph Zallinger, "The Age of Reptiles" and "The Ag
  18. a book review of: The Beginning of the Age of Mammals by Kenneth D. Rose. Johns Hopkins. 2006. $160 retail hardcover. Today, when we think of prehistoric mammals, images of mammoths, wooly rhinos, and Smilodon might come quickly to mind but they date back only to the recent ice ages - mere moments ago in geologic time. If your first thought was of Oligocene oreodonts, entelodonts, or hyaenodonts, then you might have a better idea of how many entire families of mammals had already diverged and died out even before the Oligocene Epoch started 34 million years ago. "The Beginning of the
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