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  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

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  1. Microraptorfan

    Mesozoic Gars

    I thought I would ask here, do any of the members here have Mesozoic gar fossils in their collection, im not looking to buy them, more wanting to see the range of Mesozoic fossil gar material owned by members here
  2. Hello everyone, Some time ago I was talking about a gastropod fossil with an individual online who thought that it was an ammonite, During this conversation one thing was brought up that I have wondered about for a long time but have not actually been able to answer, and that is what exactly do we consider an ammonite? I have always thought that ammonites are the cephalopods with an external shell containing complex sutures which occur throughout the Mesozoic, but people have pointed out that certain sites talk about ammonites going back to the Devonian. I have always thought t
  3. Can someone please give me a few scanned pages from Capetta 1987 book ("Handbook on paleoichthyology: chondrichthyes II: Mesozoic & Cenozoic Elasmobranchii" Volume 3E Teeth). I am in India at present and desperately in need of the book basically for Hybodont dentition (Mesozoic) mostly Asteracanthus (strophodus) sp, Hybodus, planohybodus, spenodus, meristodonoides and edaphodon sp. the book is not available anywhere; not even in library. Very expensive, can't buy from abroad. Please help me guys, atleast you may have access to some good library having the book.
  4. pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon

    Marine reptiles of Madagascar

    Hi all, I recently became aware that Madagascar appears to have a fully developed and interesting Mesozoic marine reptile record, yet am not particularly able to find any information on them. The only article I have come across is Bardet and Termier, 1990, "Première description de restes de Plésiosaure provenant de Madagascar (gisement de Berere, Campanien)". However, I've been unable to track this article down. As such, I was wondering whether anybody on TFF might have any information on them. Basically, I'm starting from scratch, so would be very interested in the clades of
  5. IsaacTheFossilMan

    Jurassic Brachiopod

    Heya! These are a couple of brachiopods I have found in the Cotswolds, UK. They are from the Middle Jurassic, and were found encased in oolitic limestone. They are a triangular shape, and, on the first picture, you can see remnants of a hinge. The third picture shows two of these valves. I haven't done any prep on them yet, as I am unaware of their exact shape, and do not want to risk damage to the actual fossil, so there is visible amounts of matrix. If anyone could put me on the right tracks of identification, or perhaps give me a rough ID, I would be very grateful!
  6. Praefectus

    Tyrannosaur Tooth

    Premaxillary tooth EDIT: Changed from Tyrannosaurus rex to Tyrannosaurid indet.
  7. Praefectus

    Indeterminate Tyrannosaur

    Dimensions: CH = 41 mm CWB = 10 mm CBL = 16 mm MC = 18 denticles/5 mm DC = 14 denticles/5 mm DSDI = 1.29
  8. I've always loved living fossils, especially the fish. They are relics of an age long lost, offering us a glimpse of an incredible prehistoric world. Some are enigmas that survived countless extinction events since the Devonian. Others are majestic predators that swam alongside the dinosaurs. Let me present my collection of living fossil fishes from the Mesozoic and before. I will begin with one of the most famous of all - the coelacanth Coelacanth Species: Whiteia woodwardi Age: 252.3 - 251.3 mya | early Triassic Formation: Diego Basin; Middle Sakamena Formation
  9. I was recently reorganizing my fossil collection and thought I would share some pieces I collected during Paleontology field trips in undergrad at Alabama. I'm glad I took thorough notes at the time! The demopolis chalk is a popular formation for finding Exogyra/ostrea/pycnodonte shells and shark teeth. We visited a site in Tupelo, MS many times for surface collecting. Some of the cool pieces I found were many fragments of a mosasaur jaw (top pic, top 2 slots), a Squalicorax kaupi tooth, a scyliorhinus(?) tooth, bony fish vertebrae, and bony fish teeth. I was told the dark fossils
  10. I have a couple riker boxes of a few dinosaur teeth. Nothing super high quality; I enjoy a variety of teeth and was on a budget so I never looked for the highest quality of teeth to buy. I'm happy with a nice representative sample of the animal. I've moved away from buying many specimens now as I'd rather go out and find my own at some point, but I bought these years ago and I'm very happy with the diversity they represent. Plus as I teach geology, they are great teaching specimens for the kids to. First up is my collection of Cretaceous North American teeth from Hell Creek
  11. musicnfossils

    MusicnFossils’ Living Room

    Hello all, I was waiting a while to show my ever growing collection until I finally got this new shelf. I wanted to paint it to look similar to my other shelf, install these neat colour changing lights, organize things and move everything...then take photos! I had stored everything in my bedroom for a while but now everything is front & center for visitors. As has has been made obvious by my many ID posts and couple threads in the, “fossil hunting trips” section, I live in a fossil rich area have access to much land to collect from frequently, so I will use this t
  12. Oxytropidoceras

    Australian Ammonites

    McNamara, K., 1987-1988. Australian Ammonites. Australian Natural History. 22(7), Summer 1987-88, pp. 332-336. Index and PDF links to Australian Natural History (1962-1995) Yours, Paul H.
  13. WyoProspector

    What is it?

    Hi all, I'm recently retired and I live in NW Wyoming and was wondering if anyone could shed some light on these specimens? Im particularly interested in the big rock/fossil? at the top of the picture. I found all of these on the surface in a sandstone, drab mudstone formation. Possibly Eocene, Paleocene time frame based on some quick geologic research. Looks like a foot to me but I suppose it could be about anything. The other items were found in the same area with the larger one. The area would have once been the near the edge or boundary of Lake Gosiute an/or the inland seaway I
  14. paleoflor

    Mesozoic unknown

    Dear TFF-members, Can anyone help me identify the fossils in the photographs below? I have trouble identifying the concentric patterns that are visible on these (apparently hollow?) shell-like fragments. They were found in the Pyrenees, Spain. The formation in which they were found is Mesozoic in age, most likely Jurassic. Note these are outcrop photographs, so I cannot make additional images to aid identification, unfortunately. Thanks for any feedback you may be able to provide. Kind regards, Tim
  15. Ok, I just came across articles about soft tissue remains, apparently including some form of degraded blood, in a mosasaur. That of course, brings up the T-Rex soft tissue found, to me. I seem to understand what I keep reading, but I can’t help it, again I find myself thinking...Really? C’mon, REALLY??? Am I just misinterpreting the whole thing, or is there actually real, true, gen-u-ine unfossilized/in mineralized, preserved soft tissues and blood remains in these 70ish million year old “fully” umineralized animals? ...............HOW?????????????? How, when the rest of the an
  16. Today, instead of bemoaning the paucity of marine cretaceous rocks in my state, I reframed the situation as follows: "In the Cretaceous, most of Missouri was not ocean but land, with lots of exposed limestone that dinosaurs were likely walking around on." This led me to the following question: Do we have no fossil examples of dinosaurs that fell in sinkholes / caves / paleokarst and were preserved there, perhaps discovered during quarrying of the limestone? We definitely have such examples for fossil mammals, reptiles, etc., including Pleistocene (Ocala), Pliocene (Pipe Creek Jr.), a
  17. Hello everyone, I have decided a while ago that I would focus on collecting Paleozoic material, because of this there are quite a few fossils I have that I purchased a long time ago and do not have an interest in keeping, these guys are not that special and I am not looking for much of anyone even does want to trade with me, but I do prefer Paleozoic material. I will post what I have here. 1.Lebanese shrimp fossil Cretaceous GONE/TRADED 2. Geocoma carinata I believe from the Solnhofen 3. Chunkosaurus 4.some cretaceous teeth, spinosaurus, Squalicorax, scapano
  18. I recently saw a wonderful diagram showing the fossil ranges of various scleractinian coral architectures, or at least the ranges of genera typical of those architectures. But now I can't seems to find it again... The diagram included images of the various coral growth forms and was simpler than but otherwise similar to this: If anyone knows where I might have seen such a diagram, please post the url here -- thanks!
  19. A couple of weeks ago, I was in Barnes & Noble bookstore and spotted this book in the science section. It's too close to Christmas to get it for myself but I was content to look through it there. I was familiar with the artwork of Jay Matternes (and I'd seen the cover of the book two months before it was published in October) from various publications especially a small souvenir booklet I bought at the visitor center at Agate Fossil Beds National Monument back in the 90's. In that little book there are mini versions of murals he painted for the halls of the Smithsonian along with recons
  20. Hi I was just at my aunts house and in her house I found a ammonite I asked her where it was from and she said she got it in Cuba which made me wonder what creatures lived in Cuba in the Mesozoic I found out In the Jurassic there where Pliesiosaurs, Ichthyosaurs and ammonites and lots of pterosaurs also there has been some dinosaurs too which surprised me because I thought Cuba was under water there’s a few remains of sauropods a Camarasaur and a Diplodocus like sauropod some more fragmented Sauropod bones and some bones of a unknown Saurischian also some unknown reptile bones have been foun
  21. doushantuo

    cretaceous,USA,Pisces

    A new large Late Cretaceous lamniform shark from North America, with comments on the taxonomy, paleoecology, and evolution of the genus Cretodus Kenshu Shimada &Michael J. Everhart Article: e1673399 | Received 30 Nov 2018, Accepted 09 Sep 2019, Published online: 18 Nov 2019 LINK (description of Cretodus houghtonorum n.sp) edit:5,30 MB,or thereabouts relevant: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Containing Papers of a Biological Character Vol. 210 (1921), pp. 311-407 V I I I .— On the Calcificati
  22. I have been asked this question many times. The non avian Dinosaurs died out the the end of the Mesozoic but many other animal groups survived. Among them were the Crocodilians. And people ask me all the time how they survived while the Dinosaurs didn't. So this has inspired me to make my first video on my dedicated Paleontology channel, Paleo Analysis. I am making these videos for the purpose of education so feel free to share this video as well as future videos! https://youtu.be/Gan8Vu4oM0w
  23. MaastrichianGuy

    Need help

    so i went to Orlando Science Center today for the Dino Digs exhibition but in Jurassic Ridge dig pit area i know that there is a Camptosaurus, Camarasaurus, Ceratosaurus and a Stegosaurus, but there is some species and genus of dinosaurs and other animals that i dont know what there like take for example the turtle shell, the alligator crocodile like animal fossil, the ankylosaur like fossil and that bone that i dont know what species does it belong to and that nest that i don't know which dinosaur does it belong to.
  24. Hey Everyone - I hope someone can provide some insight and help me identify this fossil. I would really appreciate it! I found this strange looking tooth (at least I think it is) a few years ago in San Antonio, Texas. It feels and looks like a rock as far as texture goes but it's shaped very similar to an animal tooth. I've attached photos for reference and labeled each one: Front Back Side Front Height - 5 inches (12.7 centimeters) Front Width - 4.5 inches (11.43 centimeters) I've also attached a Geology Map of Texas which outli
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