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  1. cngodles

    Pennsylvanian Ammonoid

    I found this a while back, but finally saw it as an Ammonoid. But which one I wonder. It is pretty thin. Unseen is the inner umbilical groove, but it’s likely not important for ID. Opposite side is unremarkable.
  2. Paleontologic Data Fossilized on IBM 8” Floppies Posted April 13, 2020 by Ben Muddiman, Ivo Duijnstee and Cindy Looy University of Chicago Museum of Paleontology Yours, Paul
  3. Hopefully I'm not breaking any rules here posting a link. I spent my weekend finally putting my catalog into a proper database, and creating a user interface for it. I used to use Google Sheets, which is pretty great. If I wanted to, I could use them as the source of data, but I decided to create a proper MYSQL database so I can keep relationships across tables, such as the stratigraphy of particular find locations. I have many more improvements coming for it, but it is at least functional right now. Everything from CG-0001 to CG-0161 is from the Glenshaw Formation, Conemaugh Group
  4. I found two of these little critters at Lake Jacksboro. I thought they were nautiloids based on the little round "hole" but upon photographing them, I can clearly see striations runing the length of the shell, more like a gastropod Euphemites, but the shape is not consistent with Euphemites but more nautiloid. Any help would be appreciated! Scale is in inches. First one: second one : Gastropod Euphemites for comparison:
  5. historianmichael

    Sphenophyllum emarginatum

    From the album: Llewellyn Formation Plants of Pennsylvania

    Sphenophyllum emarginatum Late Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation Schuylkill Co., PA
  6. I am going to start adding some images of my favorite finds which I call Collection Pieces. Identifications range from maybe, probably to most likely. I've only started to seriously collect over the past year. I've spent a great deal of time studying and learning Geology, as a hobby. I am located in Western Pennsylvania. At first, a map of the area. Anything in bright yellow is the Glenshaw Formation. The Ames Limestone layer exists between the Glenshaw and the Casselman Formations, which is the Orange color on the map. I have yet to explore the Ames Limestone, so I've only found f
  7. DPS Ammonite

    Crania Brachiopod

    Crania Crania modesta is a rare calcium carbonate Pennsylvanian inarticulate brachiopod. The shell is very thin and the ornamentation of the shell below shows through. You can see the interior of a near circular 4.6 by 4.8 mm pedicle valve that attached itself to aLinoproductus prattenianus (photo #1). A bryozoan also covers the front and back of the Linoproductus (photos #2 & #4). Photo #2 is a different photo of the same Crania as in photo #1. The Crania has a thickened rim and a sub central knob. Rowell (1965, p. 289) lists Crania as the only Pennsylvanian genus with a calci
  8. Over the past year, I've become fascinated with the often bizarre fish and sharks of the Pennsylvanian. Fortunately, my home state of Illinois is a great place to hunt for such fossils. I've shared several of these in other posts before, but wanted to put everything together in one thread. Probably won't have much to post for a few months after this, but once summer rolls around, I should hopefully have plenty of new finds to share. I would say there are three major settings in which you can find fish fossils in Illinois: Mazon Creek, black shales, and limestone. I have not had luc
  9. This was found in the Pennsylvanian LaSalle Limestone of Illinois. My best guess is that the "top" specimen is a fragment of a conulariid, and that the "bottom" specimen is a fragment of an inarticulate brachiopod. But as I have never found any trace of a conulariid at this site, I was hoping to get a second opinion. It measures about 0.75cm at the widest dimension. Inarticulate brachiopod? Close ups of the "conulariid"
  10. Wrangellian

    Payson Arizona corals

    Some more fossils that I acquired from fellow members of the local rockhound club, a couple who spend their Winters down there (except this past Covid year). I've got the location info but not the accurate stratigraphic info nor IDs. These are from two different locations in the Payson area. According to the maps in Gem Trails of Arizona (which the couple used to find the sites), the horn corals are from a spot along a road on the way to 'Agate Mountain', and the colonial types are from Houston Mesa, "right at the top of the hill". I don't know if the two locations are the same formation, or..
  11. FossilNerd

    Wayne's Carboniferous

    When it comes to fossils, I am a generalist by nature. I haven't met a fossil that I didn't like! However, in an attempt to narrow my focus a bit, I have decided to take a cue from Adam ( @Tidgy's Dad ) and start this thread. I hope to showcase some of my collection, but more importantly have a central place to post IDed specimens, information I have found regarding them, and/or ask for help with IDs. Hopefully other's will get enjoyment from seeing the specimens and potentially learn a thing or two. So come along on my journey through the Carboniferous! If you haven't had the plea
  12. From MD, visiting OKC for another week. Had a great day at Lake Texoma last weekend and looking to spend a few more days around Thanksgiving hunting with a local or with local wisdom. Could us a little help getting a little more off the beaten path where less broken fossils are more likely. I guess you'd call me an experienced newbie. Elementary science teacher by day, love to hunt fossils by the days I'm not teaching. Would love to find some more ammonites, do a nice trilobite hunt, or whatever is within a "reasonable" drive for a day or two trip. Any favorite spots or formations with c
  13. I found this oddity today while examining some fine grained finds. This is basically soft limestone, where the rock is pretty soft and most of the calcite has been dissolved. I forgot to include a scale, but if I were to guess, it's about 1/2" across the structure (12.7mm). I plan on measuring again. There were several of these throughout the piece, but this was the most prominent. My guess is some sort of Bryozoan.
  14. historianmichael

    Annularia stellata

    From the album: Llewellyn Formation Plants of Pennsylvania

    Annularia stellata Late Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation Schuylkill Co., PA
  15. historianmichael

    Stigmaria ficoides

    From the album: Llewellyn Formation Plants of Pennsylvania

    Stigmaria ficoides Late Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation Schuylkill Co., PA
  16. Titan

    Pennsylvanian Beekite Ring?

    Over a year ago when I was just starting to hunt and collect fossils I came across this the ravine slope of a creek that cuts through the Winterset limestone at my old house. It could be washed from another formation. It looked interesting so I kept it and have been trying since then to identify it. I’m not sure if I’ve landed on the right thing – or even if it’s a fossil but I am thinking it might be a beekite ring similar to the one here https://lakeneosho.org/Paleolist/99/index.html only more 3D. It’s also quite possible it’s just quarts and I’ve just looked at it too long! However I’m curi
  17. Last summer I posted a trip report about finding some Pennsylvanian black shale in a river bed in East Central Illinois http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/106753-628-illinois-black-shale-trip-w-listracanthus/. I was able to visit the site again once more in the fall last year when the river was running much lower and collect more and larger pieces of the finely bedded and fissile shale. Since then I have been slowly splitting and going through the rocks I brought home, and finding many interesting fish parts- that is definitely the dominant fauna presen
  18. Hello everyone! I've been inspired by so many good Mazon Creek topics in this forum, I thought I would start my own. I'll post my own finds, which so far don't include anything as exotic as a Tully Monster, but maybe I'll get lucky on page 134 or so... I have to credit my kids with getting me interested in fossil collecting. I was always interested in rocks and fossils but when my 10 year old son had his dinosaur phase it really sparked my interest again. I wondered if an ordinary person like me could go out and find fossils? So I Googled fossil collecting and found out that not on
  19. Runner64

    Mazon Creek Collection

    I'll update this thread with my Mazon Collection over the next few weeks. With some good weather out yesterday, I managed to get my first fossil hunt in for the season and will post a report in this topic. I will be moving this upcoming summer which will put me even further from Mazon Creek so I have purchased a few pieces to fill in the genus/species I haven't found yet and will mention if I purchased a fossil. I still hold out hope to find some of these pieces I purchased eventually but will realistically be difficult if I only can make 1 trip a year. Fauna Tullimo
  20. erose

    PSA Field Trip

    The club went to the Brownwood Spillway and Wilson Clay Pit Saturday. Weather was spectacular! I decided to skip the spillway and head straight to the old clay pit. Had the place virtually to myself for the first two hours. I headed for a spot that has always panned out with good crinoid material and some nice teeth. I had joked around with the other members that I needed to go there and find the complete crinoid calyx and arms I saw in a dream. Well I found it. But you know how things are always bigger in dreams...
  21. This morning I drove 45 miles to an auction that was taking place in Ottawa, Illinois. This auction takes place every couple of months starting in March and they usually have a lot of Native American objects and usually a few fossils. I the past I have purchased some Coconino trackways and a ton of Moroccan echinoids at a great price. Today I went because I was bored and wanted to see what they had. They had some Mazon Creek fossils in a box, some in a frame, some polished Orthoceras from Morocco, two small mammoth teeth and a 4” meg. The prices that were paid for these fossils was crazy, at l
  22. Last weekend I took advantage of the warm weather to visit my favorite exposure of the Llewellyn Formation in Eastern Pennsylvania and collect some Late Pennsylvanian plants. I had not been to this site in some time but I was inspired to visit it again by some recent Llewellyn Formation fern finds by @frankh8147. I had the site to myself except for the noise of nearby ATVs and BMX bikes whose riders were also seeking to take advantage of the great weather. Despite temperatures in the fifties, there was still snow on the ground. I spent about 4 hours digging out and splitting large blocks of sh
  23. With the nicer weather last week, I was able to make two brief trips to kick of the year. There still ended up being a lot of snow on the ground, but it was manageable. My first trip was to one of my favorite sites, a roadcut in the Pennsylvanian LaSalle Limestone in Illinois. Lots of the usual stuff was found, but the two trip makers were a small Peripristis shark tooth and a Linoproductus mass mortality plate. Here's the tooth. I think it will clean up nicely. And here are the Linoproductus. There's around 50 individuals present, and they are all quite small com
  24. historianmichael

    Mariopteris decipiens

    From the album: Llewellyn Formation Plants of Pennsylvania

    Mariopteris decipiens Late Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation Schuylkill Co., PA
  25. historianmichael

    Cyathocarpus arborea

    From the album: Llewellyn Formation Plants of Pennsylvania

    Cyathocarpus arborea Late Pennsylvanian Llewellyn Formation Schuylkill Co., PA
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