Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'permian'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • blogs_blog_99
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101
  • Ladonia Texas Fossil Park

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. ThePhysicist

    cf. Dimetrodon grandis

    From the album: Permian

    Now how can this crumb of a tooth be attributed to Dimetrodon?? First, it's serrated. It could be shark? The enamel is not smooth (not very visible in this image, a little at the bottom), so no (additionally, the serration shape is different from those of Orthacanth sharks). That narrows it down to serrated Synapsids. It turns out that very few animals at this time and location had "true" serrations, not just enamel serrations, but bumps in the dentine beneath the enamel. The enamel on this piece happens to still be clear, allowing one to see the globular dentine underneath! From B
  2. ThePhysicist

    Labyrinthodont tooth structure

    From the album: Permian

    A "lucky break" in a Labyrinthodont tooth (likely Temnospondyl amphibian) still embedded in matrix reveals the intricate labyrinth of plicidentine.
  3. ThePhysicist

    Dimetrodon tooth

    From the album: Permian

    Dimetrodon sp. Wellington/Ryan Fm., Waurika, OK, USA Post-canine/posterior tooth This tooth is likely from D. limbatus, given the locality and presence of serrations: https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms4269 The same paper also rules out other serrated Sphenacodonts by the enamel ornamentation. Its smaller size could indicate that it's from a juvenile. It differs from the comparatively abundant broken Orthacanth shark tooth cusps in the microfossil matrix (what most people are likely to confuse with): the enamel texture is not smooth, the c
  4. ThePhysicist

    Hatchling Dimetrodon Claw?

    Hi y'all. Found this in some Permian micromatrix from Waurika, OK. There's no way I'm this lucky, but is this a very tiny Dimetrodon claw? I've tried to get access to this paper, but still waiting to see if the authors will send the text. I'm fairly confident it's at least sphenacodontid, based on pictures I've seen on the forum. It's about 3 mm in length. @dinodigger@jdp
  5. Fossil_teenager

    MORE FOOTPRINTS (from the Permian)

    So a few months ago I traveled to El Paso, in search of some trackways from dinos and Permian amphibians. My trackways collection has been lacking for the better part of my whole life so I decided to go get some. If you haven’t already seen them, I’ll include them here: Now how could I possibly get new footprints if I’m all the way in DC? Well, I was doing some cleaning with a toothbrush on this exact rock and to my amazement, I started seeing little footprints in the stone. Knowing that I didn’t see them before, I freaked out and almost had a heart attack. There are now 9 differ
  6. Hello everyone, I recently got some fossils from Russia, some plant remains from Perm Krai where I grew up and a couple of Productid brachiopods from Sverdlovsk Oblast. They are from the Artinskian stage of the Permian period, one is around 2.5cm in width while the other even though incomplete is absolutely gigantic, the largest I have in my collection. I am not great at identifying Productid brachiopods and the Permian is probably the period I have least experience with within the Paleozoic so I have not been able to ID them myself. The large one looks similar to some Reticula
  7. Hello. From a recent trip to the Perm-Carboniferous petrified wood, we brought back some very interesting fragments; nothing like this has come across before. Usually we find fragments of wood (chips), without knots, without a pronounced structure - just highly silicified, indeterminate fragments. But while this trip from a small area (just a couple of square meters), we collected several interesting fragments. This is a solid piece of the trunk with knots located at the same level. 7 knots. Another similar fragment, but split lengthwise. There are only 3
  8. Fossil_teenager

    Texas and New Mexico Dino tracks

    Wow is all I can say. I cannot believe what I have managed to find this week alone. I went to Texas for a vacation, and I’m coming out with some of my best fossils (in my opinion) I’ve found this year. I came here hoping to score some trace fossils of what once lived here, and score some, I did! Since there are two different time zones, and 4 different types of fossils found, I’ll split them up based on environment, and time. With marine fossils going first and tracks going second. Permian first, and Cretaceous second. I’ll do a picture of the whole haul and then we’ll get started. I also was
  9. Can anyone confirm this temnospondyl amphibian is Sclerocephalus häuseri? Thanks in advance. Unprepared about 70 to 80% complete fossil from the Permian of Germany. Geological Time Scale Eon: Phanerozoic Era: Paleozoic Period: Permian Sub Period: None Epoch: Early Stratigraphy Glan Group Meisenheim Formation Odernheimer and Jeckenbacher Subformations Biostratigraphy Odernheimer Bank, Humberg Bank, Jeckenbacher Bank
  10. ThePhysicist

    Developing Orthacanth shark tooth?

    From the album: Permian

    This may be a pathology, or a tooth in development?
  11. ThePhysicist

    Permian microfossils

    From the album: Permian

    These are virtually all the microfossils I found in two small bags of medium-grain matrix from Waurika, OK. The matrix was very fossil rich. The vast majority of the fossils are Xenacanth/Orthacanth shark teeth. Fish material is next most common, then amphibian, and lastly, identifiable reptile material is very rare.
  12. ThePhysicist

    Barbclabornia leuderensis (2)

    From the album: Permian

    Small teeth (only a couple of mm tall) from what could've been a 10'-15' shark.
  13. ThePhysicist

    Labyrinthodont tooth cross section

    From the album: Permian

    A serendipitous natural break in a labyrinthodont tooth nicely displays the enamel in-foldings which give this class of amphibians their name. ^https://aaronrhleblanc.wordpress.com/2019/04/23/dental-origami-the-elegant-shapes-of-folded-dentine/
  14. gdsfossil

    Guadalupe Mountains National Park

    I found this a few years back near (but not in) Guadalupe Mts National Park. Is it a sponge, coral, algae, or something else? Piece is about 6 inches across. Thank you for your help.
  15. ThePhysicist

    Orthacanth shark teeth

    From the album: Permian

    "Eel" shark teeth.
  16. ThePhysicist

    Edaphosaurus "cross-bar"

    From the album: Permian

  17. ThePhysicist

    Edaphosaurus spine bite marks

    From the album: Permian

    I'm very confident these marks are from predation/scavenging. By who? Could be Orthacanth sharks, or maybe Dimetrodon (though they seem too small).
  18. ThePhysicist

    Edaphosaurus spine

    From the album: Permian

    These can be easily identified by their "cross-bars."
  19. ThePhysicist

    Dimetrodon spine

    From the album: Permian

    Spine section from Dimetrodon sp. (limbatus?).
  20. ThePhysicist

    Amphibian teeth

    From the album: Permian

    These could be Eryops, but really can't say.
  21. ThePhysicist

    Sarcopterygian fish teeth

    From the album: Permian

    Lobe-finned fish teeth, our close relatives.
  22. ThePhysicist

    Orthacanthus platypterygius

    From the album: Permian

    Freshwater "eel" shark teeth.
  23. ThePhysicist

    Progyrolepis sp. tooth base

    From the album: Permian

    These teeth are commonly associated with labyrinthodonts, but the base clearly doesn't support that.
  24. ThePhysicist

    Progyrolepis sp. fish teeth

    From the album: Permian

×
×
  • Create New...