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  1. daves64

    Peace River wood

    I recently purchased a "Pay Dirt" box from forum member MikeG @Bone Daddy's site for a little something to do. In it was this piece of wood. Originally it was a very dark brown, almost black color (imagine that from Peace River). Anyway, I went over the front of it lightly with a 600 grit sanding cloth & the color lightened up nicely. Filed & polished a bit of the upper end & found that it may not be regular wood. Measures 7 cm long by 2.5 cm at it's widest. First 2 pics are the front & back. Pics 3, 4 & 5 are the polished bit at 60x, 75x & 100x respectively. Not used t
  2. In Colorado there is a formation called the Dawson Formation also known as the Dawson Arkose Formation. The most common fossil by far is petrified wood and although I haven’t found any vertebrate fossils from dinosaurs and mammals have been found. It covers a relatively large time span from late Cretaceous to early Eocene, about 70-54 million years old. A member that has also found fossils in this formation, Blake @FossilDudeCO. Although it has been over three years since he was on his posts have still helped. He said that further south is Eocene but higher north in Parker and Aurora is Cretac
  3. val horn

    petrified wood chadron nebraska

    i was out hunting white river fossils on a paid ranch near chadron nebraska. found an area with occasional typical mammal and turtle fossils but also large amounts of these layered agatized rocks that I hope are petrified wood. also found were occasional yellow brown translucent "melted wax" pieces that I was told was derived from sap. I thought this is great and brought enough home and now I wonder is it petrified wood or if it purely geological. Please take a look and tell me what you see. there are other areas of badlands within her ranch that have clearly agatized mammal bones, and o
  4. vintorez

    Jasperized Petrified Wood?

    I have a decent collection of petrified wood I've found here in Utah mainly Triassic Chinle, Jurassic Morrison, and Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formations. This one has me a little stumped though and I am mainly looking to see if anyone has seen something similar to this. I'm about 80% sure it's jasperized petrified wood. Possibly an old rotting log. This was found near Park City, Utah in Keetley volcanic strata. The locality is not from the ash deposits that produced the nice Silver Creek Junction petrified wood (now extinct under commercial developments) but more likely from the violent lahar
  5. Hi everyone! Recently I bought this piece of blue petrified wood. In the process of cleaning, I have soak the whole piece in muriatic acid for about a day and half, and in water with baking soda for about 2 days to neutralize the acid. To my surprise the whole skin turn white and the dark blue part has turned much pale in color. I have attached a few photos below for your reference, please noted that when the whole piece is dry the white part is complete white and opaque, but when I added water, the white part became translucent. I am not sure if I have somehow damage i
  6. Hello. I want to show you some examples from my collection. This is a Carboniferous wood. The preservation is not the best, but for me these samples are interesting for the presence of crystals of smoky and ordinary quartz on them. A sliver that has broken off from a larger fragment. There is more quartz than wood Perhaps a stem or stump - it is almost round in cross section. And thickly overgrown with crystals. Large flattened fragment; perhaps the first sliver was from it.
  7. Found this item in a creek in the blue ridge mountains. It is very heavy for the size. Any thoughts on if it could be petrified wood or just a schist rock?
  8. DVL

    Possible Petrified Wood?

    I'm told this may be petrified wood but it looks a bit different from the petrified wood I've seen from the southwestern states. Found on a beach in northeast US. Please let me know your thoughts. Thank you --Dwight
  9. Good evening. A couple of days ago I managed to go to three places with petrified wood at once. These outlets are not nature reserves; most often, these are fields that are just cultivated, roads and natural outcrops of bedrock (gullies, ravines, etc.). The first place is a small field, as well as a forest protection strip near a spruce planting (it was just plowed up). On a country road, one can see the rock outcrops, in which the wood is hidden. Large cobblestones are also found in the root-bed, but more often these are small sl
  10. Hello. From a recent trip to the Perm-Carboniferous petrified wood, we brought back some very interesting fragments; nothing like this has come across before. Usually we find fragments of wood (chips), without knots, without a pronounced structure - just highly silicified, indeterminate fragments. But while this trip from a small area (just a couple of square meters), we collected several interesting fragments. This is a solid piece of the trunk with knots located at the same level. 7 knots. Another similar fragment, but split lengthwise. There are only 3
  11. I thought I would share this unique piece of petrified wood I own. I don’t know if this is rare, but I couldn’t seem to find anything on this. To the naked eye, the rings of the wood are tiny white rocks. But under the microscope, you can clearly identify agates. Fraxinus Nigra is the name of the species. The microscopic pictures are too large for the post, but I think you can download them to view.
  12. treebarkjerry

    Southern Illinois petrified wood

    Out collecting some chert in Union County Illinois and came across two chunks of what I think are petrified wood. The small piece in the first two photos shows good wood grain, and an odd black chert or almost coal looking layer around the outside. The larger piece doesn't seem to show much grain...notched a corner off on a tile saw but the cut is so rough it's hard to see what the grain looks like. Both have an odd flattened cross-section seen in the photos. The 'bark' is odd to me too - thought it might be fossilized bone at first but don't think so anymore. Anyone else that
  13. I'm trying to identify the polished fossil material in this Georgian English snuffbox, circa 1760 to 1820. Is it mammoth ivory? Walrus? Wood? Something else? The material is set in unhallmarked sterling silver. Thanks in advance for your suggestions. Adam
  14. BAAMM

    Found in Wisconsin

    Found my first piece of fossilized wood looking to learn a little bit more about it anybody have any information.
  15. Rubykicks

    Petrified wood identification

    I believe this is petrified wood. I Found this and a larger piece, but the larger one is a different texture. It's more smooth with dimples and I was able to figure out identification of that one, but I'm not so sure about this one. Any information?
  16. Harry Pristis

    Florida palm "wood"

    From the album: PLANT, WOOD & MINERAL SPECIMENS

    The common practice for petrified wood is to use "form genera" names for specimens, thus all petrified palm fiber is described as Palmoxylon sp and the roots as Rhizopalmoxylon sp. The reason for this convention is that the wood rarely gets as much attention as the foliage when plants are described and these components are rarely, if ever, found attached. In the Early Pleistocene, about two million years ago, this bit of trunk was driftwood in the paleo Santa Fe River. The waterlogged wood sank to the bottom in a basin in the river channel. They became buried in a highly organic mud durin

    © &copyHarry Pristis 2008

  17. Harry Pristis

    Beetle Borings on Petrified Wood

    From the album: PLANT, WOOD & MINERAL SPECIMENS

    In the Early Pleistocene, about two million years ago, these twigs and bits of trunk were driftwood in the paleo Santa Fe River. The waterlogged twigs sank to the bottom in a basin in the river channel. They became buried in a highly organic mud during seasonal flooding. This anaerobic, low-energy burial preserved fine details such as bark and even insect borings. The wood is thoroughly mineralized with apatite -- it 'clanks' when two pieces are tapped together. This wood is dated biochronologically by the vertebrate fossils also found in the mud, notably Holmesina floridana, a gian

    © Harry Pristis 2008

  18. Harry Pristis

    Pathologies (knots) in Petrified Wood

    From the album: PLANT, WOOD & MINERAL SPECIMENS

    In the Early Pleistocene, about two million years ago, these twigs and bits of trunk were driftwood in the paleo Santa Fe River. The waterlogged twigs sank to the bottom in a basin in the river channel. They became buried in a highly organic mud during seasonal flooding. This anaerobic, low-energy burial preserved fine details such as bark and even insect borings. The wood is thoroughly mineralized with apatite -- it 'clanks' when two pieces are tapped together. This wood is dated biochronologically by the vertebrate fossils also found in the mud, notably Holmesina floridana, a gian

    © &copyHarry Pristis 2008

  19. Harry Pristis

    pine cone

    From the album: PLANT, WOOD & MINERAL SPECIMENS

    In the Early Pleistocene, about two million years ago, this pine cone cob was driftwood in the paleo Santa Fe River. The waterlogged wood sank to the bottom in a basin in the river channel. They became buried in a highly organic mud during seasonal flooding. This anaerobic, low-energy burial preserved fine details such as bark and even insect borings. The cob is thoroughly mineralized with apatite -- it 'clanks' when two pieces are tapped together. This pine cone cob is dated biochronologically by the vertebrate fossils also found in the mud, notably Holmesina floridana, a giant arm

    © Harry Pristis 2013

  20. Harry Pristis

    twig pathology

    From the album: PLANT, WOOD & MINERAL SPECIMENS

    This bit of petrified wood, largely replaced by apatite (calcium phosphate), exhibits some damage from insects, or it may be a canker from a bacterial or viral infection. You can see other images with a brief discussion here: http://www.thefossil...ogy#entry368790 In the Early Pleistocene, about two million years ago, these twigs and bits of trunk were driftwood in the paleo Santa Fe River. The waterlogged twigs sank to the bottom in a basin in the river channel. They became buried in a highly organic mud during seasonal flooding. This anaerobic, low-energy burial preserved fine deta

    © Harry Pristis 2013

  21. hndmarshall

    Just Weird...What is this???

    Ok found this Odd thing at first thought it might be petrified wood but I tried looking at it through a microscopic camera and could not find any of the basic fossil wood cell structure that I normally find on petrified wood. There are places on it that look mesh like? ....well I took a close up of it ... if it were some type of bone the inside would be darker right?....just not sure with this one. Found in a gravel load from the bed of the Brazos River near the West Houston Texas area.
  22. AggieGrass

    Landscape River Rock Finds

    Howdy, Couple day old member here. I am a Landscape Professional and I see alot of river rock. Lately I've moved to Austin, TX and have noticed alot of petrified wood in the rock materials we use. I'm 99% positive it is all native, locally sourced in the Texas Hill Country. Anyway I have a few pieces I'm curious to whether it's machine marks or not and a couple pieces I'm not sure if they're just gnarly rocks or not. Petrified wood ID is what brought me here and I found some good info so I signed up. Any information and help is greatly appreciated. Thanks yall!
  23. psaggu

    Petrified Wood?

    Hi All Found this on a red clay mound near my house, newly developed area, so may have been dug up during excavation works.
  24. I_gotta_rock

    Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album: Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under white light (top) and short-wave ultraviolet light (bottom) Miocene Odessa, Delaware

    © copyright 2021 Heather JM Siple

  25. I_gotta_rock

    Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album: Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under white light (top) and short-wave ultraviolet light (bottom) Miocene Odessa, Delaware

    © copyright 2021 Heather JM Siple

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