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  1. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex Tooth

    Identification: This tooth was sold as being from a Dromaeosaur. The serrations' shape and their similarity on both carinae say otherwise. In the Hell Creek Formation, there are potentially two Tyrannosaur species. If Nanotyrannus is invalid, then this is automatically a T. rex tooth. For those who consider Nanotyrannus to be valid, this tooth is still T. rex based on the robustness of the tip and serrations, and the CHR (Crown Height Ratio). Tyrannosaurus maxillary teeth may still have minor basal compression, as this one does. This is from a juvenile animal based on its small
  2. Hello, seen another tooth, this time it is a fragment of the tip, according to the seller, it is from the Hell Creek Formation, South Dakota. Sorry for the poor quality of the images, but I'm uploading them from my cell phone. As soon as I can, I will replace them with better quality ones. I would appreciate any comments from you.
  3. ThePhysicist

    Hell Creek Tyrannosaur Denticle Variation

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Comparison of Tyrannosaur denticles (serrations) from the Hell Creek Formation. All of the images are set to the same scale Some differences are likely associated with position in the mouth and/or feeding wear. So, this may not be a perfect illustration of purely ontogenetic variation. The adult T. rex denticles are from an unknown position and carina (being from a tooth fragment), the juvenile T. rex denticles are from the distal carina of a right (rear?) maxillary tooth, and the infant T. rex denticles are from the distal carina of a posterior tooth. The Nanotyrannus
  4. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex tooth tip

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Formation Garfield Co., MT, USA Note: From the right maxillary of a juvenile animal, but still has adult qualities like a robust tip and denticles.
  5. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex mesial serrations

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Formation Garfield Co., MT, USA Note: Juvenile animal
  6. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile T. rex distal serrations

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Tyrannosaurus rex Hell Creek Formation Garfield Co., MT, USA Note: Juvenile animal
  7. Hello again. I saw this tooth on the internet, I don't know what dinosaur it could be from. In the description of the publication it does not say anything, only that it is from the theropod and from the United States. I suspect it is from a tyrannosaurid, but which one? I don't know. Gorgosaurus? or T rex? There is no further information on the origin or training where it was obtained. What do you think it could be? I know that with so little data not much can be done, but I would like to know the opinions or suggestions that you have on this ma
  8. Hi All, I'm new to this forum and thought I'd send over images of my theropod teeth plus one extremely impressive sauropod from Madagascar. Hope you like them! Paul
  9. TOM BUCKLEY

    @troodon post

    A couple of days ago there was a thread that provided links to @Troodon 's id posts about identifying tyrannosaurid teeth. I didn't bookmark them and can't locate them. Any guidance would be appreciated. Thanks.
  10. Is this really a Tyrannosaur metatarsal as it says? I’ve been hunting something really nice from a Tyrannosaur (T Rex)
  11. ThePhysicist

    T. rex posterior dentary tooth

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A high-quality replica of Stan's posterior right dentary tooth. About 4.5" in length.
  12. ThePhysicist

    T. rex ontogenetic comparison

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Two teeth from Tyrannosaurus rex at different growth stages. The adult is a replica of a posterior right dentary tooth of Stan. The baby/juvenile is also a posterior tooth (about 6 mm long), found in the Hell Creek Fm. (more info: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/collections-database/chordata/dinosaurs/baby-t-rex-tooth-r1992/). It could also be a dentary tooth based on the wear patterns, but I'm not sure.
  13. ThePhysicist

    T. rex posterior dentary tooth mesial carina

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Posterior dentary tooth replica from Stan the T. rex (11th from front). Note there is a slight "twist" of the mesial carina in this specimen.
  14. ThePhysicist

    T. rex posterior dentary tooth distal carina

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Posterior dentary tooth replica from Stan the T. rex (11th from front).
  15. The_bro87

    T. rex or Nanotyrannus?

    Hello! I got this tooth as a Christmas present, and to me it looks like a T.rex tooth, but the shape of the base made me less sure. I was hoping someone could help get a accurate id. The tooth is 10/16 of an inch long, and was found in Garfield county Montana.It has similar serrations on both sides, so I thought it was a tyrannosaur tooth. The shape, lack of pinching at the base, and thickness made me think it was T.rex, and the base looked to me like it could be a maxillary tooth since it was more rectangular than oval, but I wanted to see if anyone thought it looked more like a Nanotyrannus
  16. ThePhysicist

    Baby Tyrannosaurus rex

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Posterior baby/juvenile T. rex tooth. Hell Creek Formation Carter Co., MT, USA Fossil in TFF collections: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/collections-database/chordata/dinosaurs/baby-t-rex-tooth-r1992/ This tooth is also very similar to a few in the collection of @Troodon: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/57402-my-jurassic-park-hell-creeklance-tyrannosaurs/
  17. ThePhysicist

    Baby Tyrannosaurus rex Tooth

    Identification: Originally listed as a Dromaeosaurid tooth, I suspected it was from a Tryannosaurid. Upon receiving the tooth, I contacted a few paleontologists to get expert opinions. Their conclusion was that the tooth was likely from a baby/juvenile Tyrannosaur. Since the only Tyrannosaurs in the Hell Creek Formation are Tyrannosaurus rex and Nanotyrannus lancensis (or only T. rex if N. lancensis is a young T. rex), and considering the cross-section of the base of the tooth, this must be from a baby Tyrannosaurus rex. This tooth shares many qualities with adult teeth, a fact which
  18. Hi, I have now corrected my previous post to avoid breaking the rules. I saw this recently and it actually seems too good to be true. I suspect that it may be false, as the stone that contains it does not look very natural in color, although the skeleton looks quite good. if you could comment on that it would be great.
  19. Raptor9468

    T rex skeleton in 3D game

    I originally came up with this idea after thinking of making a video about Stan the T rex but then decided to try to build a full fledged model of a T rex. Since I have no modeling experience at all,I decided to build it in a pretty popular game,notice one block equals to 12.666cm. After finishing it it looked familiar but not the typical t rex type,if anyone would have any suggestions feel free to tell me.Also tell me if it looks like another theropod cause this is reminding me of something else
  20. ThePhysicist

    Tyrannosaurus rex serrations collage

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    To me, serrations are such a fascinating tool. They were independently evolved many times in many different animals. They concentrate force into smaller points (increasing the pressure = Force/Area) so that the thing being bitten would break or cut along the line of serrations. They also are great for "sawing" through things such as muscle. T. rex definitely made great use of this adaptation. Topmost (greyscale) image from "Physical evidence of predatory behavior in Tyrannosaurus rex:" https://www.researchgate.net/publication/249649164_Physical_evidence_of_predatory_behavior_
  21. ThePhysicist

    Stan T. rex tooth replica (2)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    Closeup shot of the distal serrations.
  22. ThePhysicist

    Stan T. rex tooth replica (1)

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A high-quality replica of Stan's 2nd maxillary tooth. About 11.5" in length. Displayed with a 3D-printed stand I designed.
  23. ThePhysicist

    T. rex tooth chunk

    From the album: Dinosaurs

    A small piece of (probably) rex tooth from the Lance Creek Fm., WY. Shown next to a replica for comparison.
  24. Dracarys

    Juvenile nanotyrannus and T Rex

    Hi all! I just obtained an 8 mm juvenile T. rex tooth and have compared it to my 13 mm juvenile nanotyrannus tooth. Even though they are located in different positions in the jaw, there is a remarkable difference in the two teeth. I just don’t understand how these cannot be two different species?! The debate goes on...
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