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EDIT (Updated August 19): Current 2020 Running Tally of Ontario Bugs. New species for this year in bold

Acanthopyge contusa

Anchiopsis anchiops

Bathyurus (Raymondites) longispinus

Bufoceraurus bispinosus

Bumastoides milleri

Burtonops cristata

Calymene platys

Calyptaulax callicephalus

Ceraurinella trentonensis (?)

Ceraurinus marginatus

Ceraurus sp.

Coronura aspectans

Crassiproetus crassimarginatus

Crassiproetus canadensis

Dolichoharpes dentoni

Echinolichas sp. cf. eriopis

Echinolichas sp. cf. hispidus

Ectenaspis homalonotoides

Eldredgeops iowensis southworthi

Eldredgeops rana

Eomonarachus intermedius

Failleana indeterminata

Flexicalymene croneisi

Flexicalymene granulosa

Flexicalymene senaria

Gabriceraurus dentatus

Greenops widderensis

Isotelus "mafritzae"

Isotelus maximus

Mannopyge halli

Mystrocephala stummi

Odontocephalus n. sp.

Physemataspis pernododusus (?) 

Pseudodechenella sp. 

Pseudogygites latimarginatus

Sceptaspis lincolnensis

Terataspis grandis

Thaleops sp. 

Trypaulites calpyso

Trypaulites erinus 

 

Total: 40

New: 17

 

I'll be parking all my trilobite hunts for the year in this thread. 

With winter ending much sooner than we are accustomed to up here, it's about time to get back into the hammer-swing of things. This year is an ambitious one, no less on account of having spent some quality time with old literature, maps (new and old), to plot out a series of areas to prospect all across the province. A significant amount of fieldwork is planned as part of a broader research project.

 

This past weekend was the season opener for me, with temperatures hitting about 4 Celsius on Saturday, and near 12 Celsius on the Sunday. By now, almost all the snow has burned off, with just a few shadier spots remaining.

 

This is the view as I set out through the bush around sunrise. The ground was still frozen, which was fine as it made trekking over mud much easier.

 

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The season opener was an instance of low-hanging fruit, focusing on the site closest to me, which is imported Amherstburg/Lucas Fm fill (late Early Devonian, or early Middle Devonian -- there isn't full consensus in the literature on where to draw that line). The focus is on the reef rubble / lagoonal facies. 

 

Still a bit of snow on site, but fairly easy to work around. For the more deeply set rocks, I had to wait a bit longer for those to thaw, or otherwise knock them loose with the hammer. 

 

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All my conspicuous piles of brachs, fenestrate bryozoans, gastros, massive coral colonies, and other similar stuff I wasn't going to take back with me, are still there for the taking. 

 

Case in point, just a few bryozoans and brachs:

 

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I do make an exception for platycerids if they are complete...

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But the real goal is trilobites. The Amhertsburg/Lucas Fms at this location have yielded up to me, in order of frequency, Crassiproetus crassimarginatus, Pseudodechenella sp., Acanthopyge contusa, Mystrocephala stummi, Echinolichas cf. eriopis, Trypaulites erinus. 

 

With the exception of one in these quadriptychs, all are lichid fragments. Why collect fragments? Lichids are generally rare even as fragments, and I continue trying to be thorough at this spot. 

 

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Of course, the Crassis like to make their presence known. :P 

 

So, nothing anywhere near the spectacular finds I was making last autumn, but I have collected this spot extensively. There is not that much else in terms of viable rock to find at this location (although I will make a few more attempts). Soon it will be time to move on. Fortunately, my list of prospects is nicely populated, so that could keep me busy for the season. :) 

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Tidgy's Dad

Very nice. :)

I particularly like the last pygidium. Pseudodechenella? 

I look forward to your forthcoming reports and wish you good hunting for the season ahead. 

 

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Fossildude19

Not bad for a slowly diminishing hunting spot, though. :)

Thanks for showing these to us, Kane. 

So unlike anything we find in our usual haunts in NY. 

 

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Thanks, gents. :) 

Adam, are you referring to the last posted one or the one oddball in the foursome above? (that oddball is a Mystrocephala). I do encounter the Pseudos fairly often, and they are somewhat small! The Crassiproetus, on the other hand, are very egg-like in their convexity (far more robust than their flattened cousins at Arkona's Hungry Hollow Member!). I did bring home a Pseudo, but that was the only one I didn't photograph! :DOH:

 

I think one notable difference in terms of field time would be the changeover from smoker to non-smoker. It would be customary that I would reward myself with a smoke break after every trilobite found. Now, I take no breaks. Couple that with heavier winter training, I plan to move a lot more rock this year. :hammer01:

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Here's to a productive year. Already looks like you're off to a decent start. :popcorn:

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Tidgy's Dad
1 hour ago, Kane said:

 

Adam, are you referring to the last posted one or the one oddball in the foursome above? (that oddball is a Mystrocephala). I do encounter the Pseudos fairly often, and they are somewhat small! The Crassiproetus, on the other hand, are very egg-like in their convexity (far more robust than their flattened cousins at Arkona's Hungry Hollow Member!). I did bring home a Pseudo, but that was the only one I didn't photograph! :DOH:

The last posted one. 

Thanks for the info, I like to ask questions and when I'm wrong, I learn something new. 

And your point about the extra time now you're a brilliant non-smoker is a good one. I used to do the same; stop and have a cigarette when i found something special. So, if I get to go hunting this year, extra fossil  collecting time! :i_am_so_happy:

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Nice start to the season Kane! :) 

 

I too have researched a few new prospective hunting spots. It’s very exciting to explore a new area (or two... or three... or...)! Fingers crosses that your new sites are productive. :fingerscrossed:

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3 hours ago, Kane said:

I think one notable difference in terms of field time would be the changeover from smoker to non-smoker. It would be customary that I would reward myself with a smoke break after every trilobite found. Now, I take no breaks. Couple that with heavier winter training, I plan to move a lot more rock this year. 

:thumbsu:

 

Now, there's no stopping the Human Backhoe. :)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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1 hour ago, digit said:

:thumbsu:

 

Now, there's no stopping the Human Backhoe. :)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

It helps that I have this fetching new fossil-hunting gauntlet, too. :P 

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Fossildude19

Um, ... Kane, ... not being nosey, or anything, but, ... have you had your skin looked at by a doctor? 
You're looking a little "smurphy", there pal. Are you getting enough oxygen?  I thought you quit smoking... :unsure:   :P 

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14 minutes ago, Fossildude19 said:

Um, ... Kane, ... not being nosey, or anything, but, ... have you had your skin looked at by a doctor? 
You're looking a little "smurphy", there pal. Are you getting enough oxygen?  I thought you quit smoking... :unsure:   :P 

Gnap!! :heartylaugh:

 

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Nice start to the season Kane!! I was able to get out and do some collecting as well. The weather was great!!

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I'm happy that you are still making finds at that site Kane, but abandoning those poor Bryozoan and Brachiopod specimens? I weep for them. ;)

 

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7 hours ago, Shamalama said:

I'm happy that you are still making finds at that site Kane, but abandoning those poor Bryozoan and Brachiopod specimens? I weep for them. ;)

 

I've been leaving them out in piles just for you, but you never come by! :P :D 

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Really digging these finds, thanks for sharing!!! Are you using only chisels and an air gun to prep? Looks like you know what you're doing. 

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6 hours ago, jort68 said:

Really digging these finds, thanks for sharing!!! Are you using only chisels and an air gun to prep? Looks like you know what you're doing. 

This material doesn't require all that much by way of preparation compared to other formations I dip into. In most cases, it is a "what you see is what you get" situation, although some stuff needs some scribe work to remove covering matrix. But stuff from elsewhere? Definitely goes in my lab!

5 hours ago, Nimravis said:

Great finds Kane- nice that you got out.

Thanks, Ralph. Here's hoping the season will be generous for all of us. :) 

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dinosaur man
On 3/10/2020 at 9:57 AM, Kane said:

But the real goal is trilobites. The Amhertsburg/Lucas Fms at this location have yielded up to me, in order of frequency, Crassiproetus crassimarginatus, Pseudodechenella sp., Acanthopyge contusa, Mystrocephala stummi, Echinolichas cf. eriopis, Trypaulites erinus. 

With the exception of one in these quadriptychs, all are lichid fragments. Why collect fragments? Lichids are generally rare even as fragments, and I continue trying to be thorough at this spot. 

Screen Shot 2020-03-10 at 9.51.35 AM.png Screen Shot 2020-03-10 at 9.51.47 AM.png

Hope you find some!!, and have an amazing collecting year :yay-smiley-1:.

This year, I’m also trying to look for Trilobites in my area, haven’t found any yet, but I feel like this is the lucky year for that!!

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Well, today was an interesting one. I went back to the same spot just after dawn. The temperatures were actually going down, and the wind was picking up (making my eyes water). A lot of rock was moved and split, but not too much to show for it... Until this. Indeed. Perhaps by far the most complete example of what I suspect to be Echinolichas sp. And the added bonus of this specimen is that it appears to continue a bit more into the rock. I doubt the head will be there, but to have most if not all thoracic segments is a collecting coup. 

 

Some gentle scribing of covering matrix on the lower left pygidium, and up around the thoracic segments, and this one will look much better. 

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Echinolichas hispidus is another possibility if the medial axial spine is absent:

 

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Hall, J. & Clarke, J.M. 1888

Palaeontology VII. Containing descriptions and figures of the trilobites and other crustacea of the Oriskany, upper Helderberg, Hamilton, Portage, Chemung and Catskill Groups. Geological Survey of New York, Natural History of New York, Palaeontology: Volume 7:1-236

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