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Hello forum members!

 

With the new Coronavirus raging across the world, I thought it would be nice to start some kind of advent calendar, using my own Squalicorax collection.

Everyday I will post one or multiple Squalicorax teeth from one location. Let's see what ends sooner, my collection or the virus outbreak. 

 

I will start with the oldest tooth from the Albian substage and end with the teeth from the uppermost substage; the Maastrichtian.  

 

The first one is the oldest and also one of the smallest teeth in my collection.

Unfortunately it is so small that the photo's are not as sharp as I would have liked, but I think they are good enough.

 

It is Squalicorax primaevus from the Middle Albian Argiles tégulines of Courcelles, Aube Department, France.

 

See you guys tomorrow,

Sander

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FranzBernhard

Such a nice idea, thank you!

 

2 minutes ago, sander said:

Let's see what ends sooner, my collection or the virus outbreak.

This will strongly depend on the number of teeth you have :zzzzscratchchin:!

Franz Bernhard

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FranzBernhard
4 minutes ago, sander said:

Unfortunately it is so small that the photo's are not as sharp as I would have liked, but I think they are good enough.

Sure they are good enough!

Do you have a flat bed scanner? Can give surprisingly good results!
Franz Bernhard

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4 minutes ago, FranzBernhard said:

Such a nice idea, thank you!

 

This will strongly depend on the number of teeth you have :zzzzscratchchin:!

Franz Bernhard

 

Well, I have enough to pass the date posed by the government here of social isolation.

Luckily it is not as bad as in Italy or Spain yet with their police patrols.

It will depend on how many weeks the government will extend this period if I can make this work or not.

 

2 minutes ago, FranzBernhard said:

Sure they are good enough!

Do you have a flat bed scanner? Can give surprisingly good results!
Franz Bernhard

 

I do not have a scanner unfortunately, I think the lid placed on top might also crush these fragile teeth.

Also the teeth will get bigger eventually, I hope that will also improve the quality of the photographs.

 

Kind regards,

Sander

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what a great idea.  Don't put the lid down, just put a couple sheets of plain old paper on top of the fossils on the scanner.  

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FranzBernhard
1 hour ago, sander said:

I think the lid placed on top might also crush these fragile teeth.

No lid necessary! If you let the scanner open, you will get a black background. If you like to have a white to light grey background, just use a sheet of white paper above the specimen. But well, you don´t have a scanner...

Franz Bernhard

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Good idea. See you tomorrow :)

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Alright it is time for location number two.

It is not the most complete or well looking specimen I have, but I have not yet seen another Anacoracid tooth from this location yet.

that is also the reason that I do not know which species it is.

I think it might be a Squalicorax falcatus, based on the broadness of the crown. At least it is not a S. primaevus.

I like to hear your suggestions on this tooth.

In the meantime it is registered in my database as:

 

Anacoracidae

"Greensand-like" phosphatic and glauconitic sandstone
Albian-Cenomanian boundary

Stary Oskol, Belgorod Oblast, Russia

 

information on the stratigraphy here:

http://cretaceous.ru/files/pub/temp3/ncomms10825.pdf

(supplementary figure 16 and 17)

 

P.S. I have Identified the Squalicorax primaevus of yesterday using this link here:

http://www.gaultammonite.co.uk/Pages/Gault_Shark_Teeth/Anacoracidae.htm

 

See you all tomorrow!

 

Sander

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Another day, another location.

Today we will stay in Russia, on a location that is perhaps just as old as Stary Oskol, but unfortunately it has not yet been investigated scientifically.

Finds there also include Ichthyosaur vertebra, so therefore it could be from the Albian/Cenomanian border as well.

However, my source told me that it is Cenomanian, so until it has been investigated properly I will stick with that.

I bought them as Palaeoanacorax obliquus, but I think that the beige example might be Squalicorax falcatus and the smaller darker example might be Squalicorax volgensis.

 

The species names of Squalicorax are a maze anyway, with some thinking that S. volgensis and S. falcatus are actually multiple species.
For this topic I will stick with the old names, but if anyone wants to share their opinion on the current state of the Squalicorax species names then I invite them to share it with everyone here in this topic.

 

The teeth of today are: 

 

Squalicorax volgensis (left)

Squalicorax falcatus (right)

Formation unknown

"Cenomanian"

Fedorovka, Tambov Oblast, Russia

 

See you all tomorrow!

 

Sander

 

 

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Day 4 and we are still in the Cenomanian.

This time I have much more information on the age of the site, so it needs less explaining.

One of the teeth is huge in comparison to all other Squalicorax teeth from the Cenomanian.

Unfortunately it has been lying a bit too much in the sun before being collected, resulting in a white sun-bleached appearance.

Both are of the same species in my eyes.

 

Squalicorax falcatus

Tarrant Formation

Middle Cenomanian

Mansfield Highway, Tarrant County, Texas, United States of America

 

See you tomorrow!

 

Sander

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Another day another location.

Both teeth are from the Eagle Ford Group. The left one is from Austin, Travis County, while the right one was found in Travis County (exact findspot is not known).

According to figure 1 on this website:

https://www.hgs.org/civicrm/event/info?id=1513&reset=1

The Eagle Ford Group in Austin can be of Middle and Upper Cenomanian age, but also Middle and Upper Turonian.

So unless someone recognises the state of preservation of one or either of these teeth and can ascribe them to one of the four members in the Eagle Ford Group, I will keep this very broad dating.

 

Squalicorax falcatus

Eagle Ford Group

Middle-Upper Cenomanian - Middle-Upper Turonian

Austin, Travis County, Texas, United States of America

 

See you tomorrow,

 

Sander

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Tidgy's Dad

What a fun idea. :)

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A bit late today, I was making photo's a few days in advance.

 

We have now really entered the Turonian with today's Squalicorax.

Unfortunately it is not complete, but it does show nice colours and it is from an unusual location.

 

Squalicorax falcatus

Ligérien

Lower Turonian

Pont l'Abbe d'Arnoult, Charente Maritime, France

 

See you tomorrow,

 

Sander

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I have to skip the middle Turonian (because I do not posses squalicorax teeth belong to that substage) and continue with the upper Turonian.

Today I have another incomplete specimen, but again from an unusual location.

 

Squalicorax falcatus

Formation unknown

Upper Turonian

Berge (near Anröchte), Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany

 

See you tomorrow,

 

Sander

 

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For today's tooth we have remained in the Upper Turonian.

Although the label on the reverse mentions M. (Mittlere) Turon, the location is now thought of as belonging to the Upper Turonian.

The location itself is long gone, the nearby village of Strehlen is nowadays in the middle of Dresden.

Note the very nice caramel colour of the enamel.

 

Squalicorax falcatus

Strehlener Kalk, Strehlen Formation

Upper Turonian

Strehlen, Sachsen, Germany

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Today is another day in the Upper Turonian.

These teeth come from a country that is more known for its Trilobites, but Squalicorax teeth can be found there as well.

 

Squalicorax falcatus

Teplice Formation

Upper Turonian

Úpohlavy, Ústí nad Labem, Czech Republic

 

See you tomorrow,

 

Sander

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Today is the last day in I will show you teeth from the Upper Turonian.

All these teeth were labeled Squalicorax falcatus but I wonder if the diversity in shapes can all be explained by position in the jaw and age of the shark.

Perhaps there are multiple species to be seen here.

I will keep them labeled as S. falcatus until it is clear which species there are in the Upper Turonian of Northern America.

 

Squalicorax falcatus

Turner Sandy Member

Upper Turonian

Edgemont, Fall River County, South Dakota, United States of America.

 

See you guys tomorrow,

 

Sander

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For today there is a short stop in the Coniacian.

This tooth comes from the Lower Coniacian.

Unfortunately I do not have any other teeth beloning to the Lower, Middle or Upper Coniacian, so for tomorrow we are already going to the Santonian.

 

Squalicorax falcatus

Atco Formation

Lower Coniacian

Carrollton, Dallas County, Texas, United States of America

 

See you tomorrow,

 

Sander

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the tooth of today unfortunately can not be dated to one substage.

The formation from which it comes dates from the lower Santonian to the Lower Campanian.

It is however from an usual location.

 

Squalicorax kaupi

Menuha Formation

Lower Santonian - Lower Campanian

Mitzpe Ramon, Southern District, Israel

 

See you tomorrow,

 

Sander

 

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For today we are already moving into the Upper Santonian.

It is a species with a remarkable shape.

 

Squalicorax yangaensis

Marnes ferrugineuses

Upper Santonian

Sougraigne, Aude, France

 

See you guys tomorrow,

 

Sander

 

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Staying in the Upper Santonian for today.

These teeth were not identified by me, I do not know exactly what the difference is between S. lindstromi and S. kaupi, but I have kept the given name until I do know.

 

Squalicorax yangaensis (left)

Squalicorax lindstromi (right)

Tombigbee Sand Member

Upper Santonian

Columbus, Lowndes County, Mississippi, United States of America

 

See you tomorrow,

 

Sander

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Upper Santonian again today.

I am not quite sure which species the big one on the right is. 

My guess is S. kaupi, but it also does look similar to the S. lindstromi of yesterday.

 

Squalicorax curvatus (left)

Squalicorax kaupi (middle)

Squalicorax kaupi? (right)

Unknown Formation

Upper Santonian

Or (or Orr) River (also called Tykbutak/Tyk-Butak, not sure if this is the same location)

 

See you guys tomorrow,

 

Sander

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The squalicorax of today was delivered with some doubtful information.

It is an old Eton College Collection piece, said to have been found in North Yorkshire in the Yorkshire chalk.

However, I believe that there is no white chalk in North Yorkshire (there is in South Yorkshire).

It is said to have been found around 1853 possibly by Darwin or Huxley.

All I know is:

 

Squalicorax kaupi

Yorkshire chalk?

Upper Santonian - Upper Campanian

"North Yorkshire", United Kingdom

 

See you guys tomorrow,

 

Sander

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will stevenson
3 hours ago, sander said:

The squalicorax of today was delivered with some doubtful information.

It is an old Eton College Collection piece, said to have been found in North Yorkshire in the Yorkshire chalk.

However, I believe that there is no white chalk in North Yorkshire (there is in South Yorkshire).

It is said to have been found around 1853 possibly by Darwin or Huxley.

All I know is:

 

Squalicorax kaupi

Yorkshire chalk?

Upper Santonian - Upper Campanian

"North Yorkshire", United Kingdom

 

See you guys tomorrow,

 

Sander

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Generally throughout the English part of the uk there are sporadic chalk outcrops as this material comprises a serious section of strata here, so it is possible there was a small fairly unknown exposure somewhere inland eg a low lying field or river also don’t forget in North Yorkshire there was glacial movement so don’t forget the possibility of it being a glacial erratic

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23 hours ago, will stevenson said:

Generally throughout the English part of the uk there are sporadic chalk outcrops as this material comprises a serious section of strata here, so it is possible there was a small fairly unknown exposure somewhere inland eg a low lying field or river also don’t forget in North Yorkshire there was glacial movement so don’t forget the possibility of it being a glacial erratic

Well, Glacial movements mostly go from north to south, so I do not expect the chalk to go further to the north than were it was deposited. 

Also, according to geological maps there are no exposures in low lying fields, because the area to the north of east yorkshire yields older layers. Therefore the chalk that used to be on top of those layers (if that part was not land) is long gone. I really could not find any evidence of chalk fossils from (nowadays) North Yorkshire. 

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