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Hello,

 

I'm new to fossil hunting and I was hoping someone could help me identify these. I found both by Lake Erie.

 

Thanks!

IMG_20200408_083410687.jpg

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Welcome to the forum!

They're tabulate corals, looks like Pleurodictyum sp.

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2 minutes ago, TqB said:

Welcome to the forum!

They're tabulate corals, looks like Pleurodictyum sp.

Thank you!

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Fossildude19

Welcome to the Forum. :)

 

What does the other side look like? 

Sometimes, you can see the imprint of the shell or gastropod they grew on. 

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32 minutes ago, Fossildude19 said:

Welcome to the Forum. :)

 

What does the other side look like? 

Sometimes, you can see the imprint of the shell or gastropod they grew on. 

Thanks Tim. Here's the other side.

IMG_20200408_094419239.jpg

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Fossildude19

Hmm. Interesting. 

These are obviously very water worn, so I cannot identify any substrate possibilities. 

Possibly a worm tube or bryozoan on the right specimen. Either way, those are cool Pleurodictyums. :) 

 

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They very often have a worm in the middle, I'm sure that is one. Here's a decalcified one from Bolivia that bought (Devonian). (Also showing nice rod shaped negatives of the mural pores.)

 

IMG_2966.thumb.jpeg.40c030fff2d91bc5f909056032a7488d.jpeg

 

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FranzBernhard

Translating from my old paleontology book:

"Pleurodictyum, disc-shaped to half-spheric, nearly round colonies, often enclosing a S-shaped "worm" (Hicetes). Colonies are often preserved as steinkerns."

 

And just copying from wikipedia.de:

"Pleurodictyum: Diese Gattung war vom Unteren bis zum Mitteldevon weltweit verbreitet. Das besondere Kennzeichen dieser Gattung ist der Hicetes, ein Wurm der die Kolonie durchbohrte. Eventuell handelt es sich um eine Synökie, da die Koralle offensichtlich nicht stark geschädigt wurde."

 

Franz Bernhard

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I believe these are not fossils at all but rather the mineral, Chlorastrolite, a.k.a. Michigan Greenstone, a much sought after mineral for jewelry and now hard to find.

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FranzBernhard

Now that´s a bummer, @grandpa :D! Thanks for the hint!

 

Chlorastrolite (mindat page)

There are many, many pics on the nett, and not all are green (name!), many are grey.

 

But I still think the specimen in question is a fossil. But could be some of the grey Chlorastrolites Pleurodictyum instead? :D:zzzzscratchchin:

Franz Bernhard

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Fossildude19

Hmm. Interesting, but I'm sticking with Pleurodictyum, considering the "worm" shape at the bottom.

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image.thumb.png.f15245b1911e60a9bbf6e1fb4ef0043b.png

Chapter 2: Specialized, Potentially Interacting Biologic Substrates. pp. 15-42

In: Boucot, A.J. (ed.) 1990. Evolutionary Paleobiology of Behavior and Coevolution. Elsevier Science Publishers, 725 pp.

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