Jump to content

Need help to support my sons dream


Recommended Posts

Hello we are in Pensacola and our 15 year old son is an aspiring Paleontologist. He is dive certified and so are we and have a 18ft boat along with a 27 ft boat. We want to support him in his dream career choice (if he can support himself at some point LOL) and have no knowledge of how to get him experience in fossil hunting. He knows that chances are this part of his career path could be short lived and he will likely end up as a professor or museum curator but he doesn’t care. History and science are his favorite subject and as he says this is both wrapped up in one. As the country opens back up we are interested in venturing outside of the more local area to Allow him to explore what the country has to offer but for now more day trips are needed. My husband and I fish and can put you on Snapper and teach you to rig your line but we have no idea where to start with this.
Equipment, area, how to find the right spot in the river.....

I am thinking this is kind of like lobstering or scalloping. You need the right bottom and the right conditions but not sure what they are.

thank you in advance for your help. 

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Pterygotus

I have no experience myself in this kind of fossil hunting but from watching videos and research, I think that you will need a sifter and shovel and you need to find a gravel bar in a river, shovel some gravel into the shifter and pick out sharks teeth and other material. I’m afraid this is all the info I can give as I’m more of a smashing things with hammers sort of guy :P.

 

Edit: am I allowed to link YouTube videos?

 

Edit 2: here you go :D

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes please send the videos that would be very helpful 

thank you! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
hadrosauridae

Do you have any paleo/fossil clubs in the state?  I know there are a ton of people who go collecting in the Peace river.  Finding a local group that you can start with would be the best way.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Ltmguy

 

Welcome to the Forum!  

 

I've merged your topics...only one is needed.  ;)

 

@digit

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Bob Saunders

I would check into fossil collecting rules and laws of your state and area you will collect as to what may not be allowed. also what High School studies may be offered that would be applicable to College classes he will need later. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

We have applied for the required License for the state of Florida and if we find areas in other states we will investigate what is needed.

He is in all advance classes and is on track for AP and duel enrollment.

We are looking for him to get hands on experience. He was scheduled to volunteer at a local science museum this summer but that is now on hold.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll drop you a PM so we can discuss some options. Once the world starts spinning again and things return to normal, I'd suggest volunteering for the Montbrook fossil dig near Gainesville, FL. There are many different places one can hunt fossils in Florida but this one will give some experience in what a formal scientific fossil dig site is like. You don't get to keep any of the fossils you find but you can take all the photos you wish, you get to work with scientists and other volunteers, and your finds become part of the FLMNH collection with you listed as the collector. :)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I live in Baldwin County Alabama.  There are places that in Alabama to look.  Most people seem to head to point A dam for an easy experience.  There are local fossil groups you can find on Facebook for the area.  Florida panhandle area and Alabama.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bone Daddy

Welcome to the forums. And thank you for raising a young man with a healthy respect for science. He's off to a good start.  :)

 

You've already gotten some good advice above from Ken and the others, so I will just add a few pointers.

 

1) the fossil-hunting seasons in north and south Florida run opposite of each other (generally). The dry season in south Florida is between October/November to May/June when the rivers are slow and low. Panhandle rivers are usually huntable during the summer (so I am told), so that's good given your proximity to them. When in doubt, ask first.

 

2) Familiarize yourself with the Florida fossil permit rules. Some rivers and most state parks are off-limits, even if you have a permit. Some panhandle rivers like the Aucilla have active archaeological sites (that are sometimes poached), so fossil-hunting on portions of those rivers is verboten or discouraged.

 

3) Invest in a canoe or kayak. Some Florida rivers (especially the southern ones like the Peace) are very shallow in the hunting season and are impassable to most motorboats. Some of the best hunting takes place in shallow feeder creeks or shallow portions of the river (or holes in those shallow stretches).

 

4) Sifters. 1/4" mesh for general hunting. 1/8" mesh for smaller/micro fossils. 1/2" mesh for larger megs and bits. The quarter-inch will generally be the most useful.

 

5) For divers - a BRIGHT dive light. The brighter the better, since most Alabama/Florida rivers are blackwater affairs with low visibility. Check the Equipment/Gear forum here for tips on hunting and diving gear.

 

Be ready for a lot of trial and error, but it's a fun process. The best spots (the so-called "honey holes") are closely-guarded secrets and most folks will not share them, so you have to just get out there and explore.

 

 

 

 

 

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...

@Ltmguy Sorry to be getting on this thread so late but I wanted to share with you some information on the benefits of the Bright Futures Scholarship program for Florida students.  My daughter took full advantage of dual enrollment and AP classes in her Florida high school.  But, by far the best benefit for college bound students in Florida is the Bright Futures program.  Any Florida high school student is eligible and all they need to do is sign up for the program, complete 100 hours of community service during their four years of high school, maintain a B+ average or better and attain the required score on the SAT or ACT test.  Based on the students test score and GPA the State of Florida will pay 75% to 100% of the students tuition to any State of Florida college or university.  To top it off, if you participated in Florida college pre-pay for your child you will get a refund check from the state in the amount of the scholarship.  Pursuing his passion for paleontology at the University of Florida could be a great opportunity and the cost would be minimal.  My daughter graduates from FSU in April with zero debt.  Good Luck!

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...