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How Big was G-Rex/MOR 1128? (Length, Height, Weight)


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AlexSciChannel

I read somewhere in a paper by Jack Horner, that G-Rex was said to be around 16 years old when it died using bone histology. In the same paper it said that it was shown by LAG intervals that G-Rex would've continued to grow for 2-3 more years had it not died. This means that the infamous G-Rex was a sub-adult.

 

Jack Horner's Paper: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.515.6451&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

This got me curious on how big exactly was G-Rex? What was its height, length, and weight? I tried googling the answers for these but to not avail as people seldom mention G-Rex all that often and there are no skeletal models or mounted skeletons. Can someone tell me why this is? And what is the true size of G-Rex.

G-Rex.PNG

Edited by AlexSciChannel
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I dont have answers for you but can provide you the following.

 

The BHI info shows that only 7 % of the skeleton was found and no skull.  Only 23 elements were found why probably no mount.  Horners paper shows two of those elements were tibias 112 cm long..   For comparison the Trex Sue tibia was 114 cm long from Brochu osteology paper 2010.  Not sure you can correlate but Sue was about 12 meter long.

 

 

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AlexSciChannel
23 minutes ago, Troodon said:

I dont have answers for you but can provide you the following.

 

The BHI info shows that only 7 % of the skeleton was found and no skull.  Only 23 elements were found why probably no mount.  Horners paper shows two of those elements were tibias 112 cm long..   For comparison the Trex Sue tibia was 114 cm long from Brochu osteology paper 2010.  Not sure you can correlate but Sue was about 12 meter long.

 

 

Holy cow, that's not nearly complete as I thought it would be. Seeing how G-Rex was a sub-adult, I find it very unlikely that if I used the tibia comparison it would yield a result that made sense. I mean 11.78 meters long? And not an adult? Give me a break. It seems the data is halted by individual variation.

 

However I did find that BHI also measured the femur of G-Rex to be 1.26 meters. 

 

Do you have any thigh, shin measurements of other T. rexes from the 68 - 67 MYA time range?

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8 minutes ago, AlexSciChannel said:

Do you have any thigh, shin measurements of other T. rexes from the 68 - 67 MYA time range?

Nope... no Trex's discovered in the 68-67 time range...all 66.8-66

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AlexSciChannel
Just now, Troodon said:

Nope... no Trex's discovered in the 68-67 time range...66.8-66

Isn't there Trixie and Scotty?

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Hi,

 

What is "G-rex" ? Please write the complete genus name.

 

Troodon, your link goes to T-rex, I didn't see G-rex.

 

Coco

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G-rex is a name that was given to a Tyrannosaurus rex discovery similar to Sue.  So not a new species.  Most Trex discoveries are named.

56 minutes ago, Coco said:

Hi,

 

What is "G-rex" ? Please write the complete genus name.

 

Troodon, your link goes to T-rex, I didn't see G-rex.

 

Coco

 

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AlexSciChannel
4 hours ago, Troodon said:

 Not sure if those have been published.  

 

Found this you might want to check this out.

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0026037

Nothing there unfortunately. For some reason there's almost no data for Trix which is odd since she ended her tour almost a year ago and they should've had plenty of time to collect data.

I did find Scotty's tho.

 

Scotty                                                                     G-Rex

Femur: 1.33 meters                                               Femur: 1.26 meters

Tibia: 1.14 meters                                                 Tibia: 1.12 meters 

Fem/BodyL: 11%

Tib/BodyL: 9.5%

 

So using Scotty's bone to length ratio, G-Rex's length would be 11.45 meters using the femur to length ratio. But using Tibia to length ratio of Scotty it would be 11.79 meters. The mean length would be 11.62 meters. Although these are very rough and measuring length by leg bones is tricky.

 

Does it make sense that a sub-adult 16 year old T. rex would be comparable in length to Wankel Rex (11.4m-11.8m)? It just doesn't seem to add up. But hey that's what you get when you try to find the length from an animal's skeleton that's 7% complete.

 

BTW do you know where I can find a skeletal mapping exactly which bone's of G-Rex were found? I've always been fascinated by fragmentary specimens.

 

 

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I would suggest you contact Pete Larsen with your questions 

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5 hours ago, Troodon said:

G-rex is a name that was given to a Tyrannosaurus rex discovery similar to Sue.  So not a new species.  Most Trex discoveries are named.

 

Do you mean G-rex is a common name and not a latin name ? Do you know what means "G" ?

 

Coco

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thelivingdead531
12 minutes ago, Coco said:

Do you mean G-rex is a common name and not a latin name ? Do you know what means "G" ?

 

Coco

So, you know the T-rex named Sue, and the T-rex named Trix? This one is just named G-rex. :) I don’t know what the G stands for, someone else may be able to answer that. 

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21 minutes ago, Coco said:

G-rex is a common name

its a nickname given to it by the person who discovered it.  I do not know what G stands for

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G is just a letter added to the name as it was discovered by the paleontologist Greg Wilson.

 

Greg's own words were when asked the exact same question:

 

"I remember after I found it (which was a fun story too) Jack asked me what I wanted to call it. I didn’t have a clever idea but my bro leaned in and said G-rex. After that all T. rex specimens for the HC project (and there were a lot) took that form."

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Perhaps G for Greg...

 

@thelivingdead531 I never heard T-rex named Trix ! (We don’t seem to have a red smilie of shame !).

 

Coco

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thelivingdead531
38 minutes ago, Coco said:

Perhaps G for Greg...

 

@thelivingdead531 I never heard T-rex named Trix ! (We don’t seem to have a red smilie of shame !).

 

Coco

Let’s change that, shall we? ^_^ Here is my museum report in Paris where I got to see Trix while she was traveling, if you’re interested. :)

I'm sure others have more detailed info on her, but I know she was discovered by a forum member. :wub:

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LordTrilobite

The Trix specimen is roughly the same size as Sue (some of the missing bits like the feet are casts of Sue's). The mount is a bit over 12 meters long if I remember right. It has a lot of bone remodeling so it was an old animal.

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AlexSciChannel
6 hours ago, thelivingdead531 said:

Let’s change that, shall we? ^_^ Here is my museum report in Paris where I got to see Trix while she was traveling, if you’re interested. :)

I'm sure others have more detailed info on her, but I know she was discovered by a forum member. :wub:

Trix isn't in Paris anymore tho. She's back at home in the Netherlands where she will be living the rest of her days.

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thelivingdead531
17 minutes ago, AlexSciChannel said:

Trix isn't in Paris anymore tho. She's back at home in the Netherlands where she will be living the rest of her days.

I know, that’s why I mentioned I saw her in Paris while she was traveling. ;)

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AlexSciChannel
On 5/19/2020 at 10:44 AM, Troodon said:

I would suggest you contact Pete Larsen with your questions 

Ok so I wasn't able to get an answer from Pete Larson but Jack Horner on twitter answered its around the 35-40ft range which is around where my estimate 11.45 m is at. Also, I mistook G-Rex's mean histology (16yo) as his age when really he could've been anywhere from 14-21 years. But the paper hypothesizes that due to G-Rex's large bones that he was estimated to be 19 years old when he died and had 2 more years of growth before he became an adult at 21 years.

 

Also G-Rex was a Robust morph of T rex much like Sue and Scotty.

 

trexgrowthdynamics.PNG

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Thats around what the Tibias showed

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  • 10 months later...

For those saying it wouldn't be possible for the animal to be 40 feet long at 16 years old, need I remind you that all animals have some individuals that express gigantism? Is it not possible that this was one such individual? To be absolutely sure, we need a rib from the individual to check for growth rings as was done with Sue.

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