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Found while tooth diving


TheSkeeter

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Looks like a coprolite! Congrats - way better than teeth!

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10 minutes ago, GeschWhat said:

Looks like a coprolite! Congrats - way better than teeth!

Just got to lick it, to be sure!:D

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3 hours ago, GeschWhat said:

Looks like a coprolite!

Feeding traces in it ? or more recent pholad borings ?

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2 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Feeding traces in it ? or more recent pholad borings ?

I have no clue what you are talking about. Lol. 

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7 minutes ago, TheSkeeter said:

I have no clue what you are talking about. Lol. 

The holes that look like a budding carpenter has been trying out his drill set.

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I’ll clean it up and take some more pictures. It has some pretty unique features. I was thinking it was some sort of molar

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Shellseeker
1 hour ago, TheSkeeter said:

I’ll clean it up and take some more pictures. It has some pretty unique features. I was thinking it was some sort of molar

Molar?  Maybe not... That second photo made me think of some bones I once found.  If , after cleaning, it turns out to be bone, 

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Just a WAG.... I always let my imagination run away with my mind....

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Looks like a piece of the limestone from the ledge that has been phosphatized and bored by pholid clams like Rockwood said. It may be a bone but not seeing bony texture in the pic. If bone the pholad burrow scenario still applies. You've probably seen meg roots bored at the ledge site.

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Are phosphate nodules present in the area? I agree with @plax that this might not be a fossil at all.

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4 hours ago, TheSkeeter said:

I have no clue what you are talking about. Lol. 

If it weren't for the features in the bottom of the most prominent hole in the last photo of the original post looking like that made by boring bivalves it would more easily pass for a coprolite.

Invertebrates commonly feed on and dig in dung balls. The holes needn't all have the same origin by any means though.

Coprolites are typically phosphatic in nature, as this piece appears to be. Hence the question about nodules (not fossils). 

I smell an ID heavily reliant on statistical odds at any rate. 

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22 hours ago, Boesse said:

Are phosphate nodules present in the area? I agree with @plax that this might not be a fossil at all.

This is actually part of the ore body that extends NW to the Phosphate Mine at Aurora. There's a good paper in the Carolina Geological Society 50th Anniversary Volume that illustrates this well. To me the shark tooth abundance is a veneer of the ore body over the River Bend Limestone at meg ledge. This ledge was a subaerial prominence on the coastal plain during most of the Pleistocene and only underwater for several thousand years most recently. Phosphatized rip up clasts are common in many of our transgressive lags as well. It is also fairly common to see a bored hard ground that isn't phosphatized (blackened) in our Castle Hayne sequences for instance. I should take some pics.

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On 7/13/2020 at 10:23 AM, Rockwood said:

I smell an ID heavily reliant on statistical odds at any rate.

Sorry coprolite hopes. You drew a really, really small number in the statistical odds column.

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