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Fossils From The Northwest Coast of Canada


Justinea

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Hello everyone!

 

These fossils were found in the Southern Gulf Islands of Western Canada. I am currently working a museum that has been mostly volunteer-run since the 1970s, so a lot of our records have gaps. These two fossils are a part of our collection, but we don't have much information on them. Do you recognize either of these two fossils? 

 

Thank you so much!

Justine

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DSCF8442-min.JPG

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The first may be a fragment of Anchura or Volutomorpha, but it is hard to be certain from an internal mold.  The second is a Diplomoceras, as fossisle said.  Do you have a copy of McLachlan & Haggart's 2017 revision of the Hornby Island heteromorphs?

 

Don

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5 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

The first may be a fragment of Anchura or Volutomorpha, but it is hard to be certain from an internal mold.  The second is a Diplomoceras, as fossisle said.  Do you have a copy of McLachlan & Haggart's 2017 revision of the Hornby Island heteromorphs?

 

Don

Does Diplomoceras sometimes have diverging ribs like we see in this specimen? I was thinking Glyptoxoceras but then I'm not sure I've ever seen diverging ribs on them, either.

I don't think Hornby is considered one of the Southern Gulf Islands. Hornby, Denman, Texada, Lasqueti are Northern Gulf Islands, I believe. I know Haslam fossils have been found on Saltspring and possibly others...

On the other hand the location could be mistaken too. :Confused05:  I've seen diverging ribs on Nostoceras.

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No, Hornby is not one of the Southern Gulf Islands.  The issue is ammonite taxonomy, not geography.  Several Northumberland Formation ammonite species have been found in correlative formations on Galiano and perhaps some other islands, although they are much less common than they are on Hornby.  Saltspring has Haslam and Cedar District Formation deposits.

 

Don

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7 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

The first may be a fragment of Anchura or Volutomorpha, but it is hard to be certain from an internal mold.  The second is a Diplomoceras, as fossisle said.  Do you have a copy of McLachlan & Haggart's 2017 revision of the Hornby Island heteromorphs?

 

Don

Hello Don, thank you for your response! I do not have a copy of that, I looked up the article which they wrote and read the abstract, but couldn't tell how to access the article - or perhaps I am wrong and it is a book? 

 

I do have a fossil at the museum which is an external specimen which looks very similar to this fossil, I can post that one, although that is assuming they are the same type. I have no idea, of course.

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These particular fossils were found on Mayne Island, if that is any help in reference to knowledge of the matrix or deposits? 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Wrangellian said:

Does Diplomoceras sometimes have diverging ribs like we see in this specimen? I was thinking Glyptoxoceras but then I'm not sure I've ever seen diverging ribs on them, either.

I don't think Hornby is considered one of the Southern Gulf Islands. Hornby, Denman, Texada, Lasqueti are Northern Gulf Islands, I believe. I know Haslam fossils have been found on Saltspring and possibly others...

On the other hand the location could be mistaken too. :Confused05:  I've seen diverging ribs on Nostoceras.

Hello! Thank you for your response.

I looked up Glyptoxoceras and Nostoceras and it seems very likely that it is something more like that, based on the other fossil that is on the other side of the rock (which I could post as well) and another very similar exterior fossil we have at the museum (again I could post, however I don't know if the two fossils are related to one another at all).

 

I am wondering how common it would be to find the curved part of a Diplomoceras?

 

These fossils are from Mayne Island. 

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Ah, I think that will help narrow it down. Apparently Mayne I. has Cedar District and Northumberland Fm but not Haslam. Nostoceras and Diplomoceras are a possibility. Not sure about Glyptoxoceras, and as I said, I've never seen diverging ribs on a Glyptox. but I've been wrong about things before. Maybe Jim Haggart of the GSC needs to have a look at this. Do you know the exact location on Mayne this was picked up? and btw which museum are you at and where is it located, if you don't mind saying?

Yes, please show the fossil on the other side of the rock.

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