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Paleoworld-101

After having another look at one of my bone fragments from the Bouldnor Formation (Isle of Wight, UK), the closest match i have been able to find is a bird acetabulum, as circled in the diagram below. But i am not an expert on avian anatomy. Can anyone else offer any insight? @Auspex 

 

Specimen is approx. 33 million years old. The Bouldnor Formation on the Isle of Wight produces a wide variety of mammals, turtles, crocodilians, birds, fish, lizards and amphibians. 

 

Measures 29 mm at its longest. The 'socket' which i think may be the acetabulum is 12.5mm in diameter. 

 

IMG_E1282.JPG.0161e1365b262e2b7e6b5b1205e2ad08.JPG

 

IMG_E1283.JPG.73f44607912e16718546c28fc52076f7.JPG

 

IMG_E1286.JPG.76fbde60682f4266acf6c033cd7a2310.JPG

 

IMG_E1284.JPG.a67757c05d6e7ccea59df880a9c85b67.JPG

 

IMG_E1285.JPG.09bef3beb87bbc98dbc8d8f7fa5cafea.JPG

 

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That’s funny. Not more than five minutes ago I posted a photo of a piece of bone that looks so much like yours (but no hole) but from Cretaceous New Jersey 

B2F514E7-4080-4BC8-A71F-E610F1C90681.jpeg

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A turtle bird ? But seriously, I have been thinking the texture seems a bit coarse for a bird myself. The shape fits the illustration given quite well though. 

A flightless bird would have a well developed pelvis, and unlike pterosaurs flighted birds needed them as a launch mechanism.

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Paleoworld-101

Hmmm can anyone suggest an expert on avian skeletal anatomy that would be suitable to show this specimen to?

I am not too familiar with the world of bird academia, or who the 'key players' are in the field. 

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@Troodon Suppose this is closer to an evolved theropod than the other choices on the menu ? 

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12 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

@Troodon Suppose this is closer to an evolved theropod than the other choices on the menu ? 

No clue 

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Hi,

 

He doesn’t come around much anymore, but he’s still a bird specialist : @Auspex

 

Coco

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51 minutes ago, Troodon said:

No clue 

For newcomers who might find this insignificant. Sometimes bone is just bone. It doesn't give up it's secrets easily.

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Hi,

Here a fellow member listed some candidates for Bouldnor birds on a family level:

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/84555-bouldnor-fm-bird-tarsometatarsus/

Given that the socket stands relatively isolated I could still imagine a mammal acetabulum.

How about a small mammal like Cainotherium?

Best Regards,

J

 

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