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I propose to show us your Cenozoic corals.
It is not necessary that it are identified although it would be better.
What is necessary is that it are dated.
Ok?
Come on, I'll start.

Cyathoseris castroi (Mallada, 1887) Lutetian South Pyrenean basin

 

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FranzBernhard

Oh, nice topic! And nice coral!

 

I have at least one big problem:

Whats your opinion, @oyo? Thank you!

Franz Bernhard

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FranzBernhard

And three others that I have already posted for FOTM:

Siderastrea_PoelsNW_4809_kompr.jpg

Koralle_2502020_kompr.jpg

Koralle_17102019_groß_kompr.jpg

Franz Bernhard

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17 minutes ago, FranzBernhard said:

Oh, nice topic! And nice coral!

 

I have at least one big problem:

Whats your opinion, @oyo? Thank you!

Franz Bernhard

I think you missed a great opportunity to show Hannes what he asked of you. In addition, the polished ones were already done, you just had to take some details from a well-preserved chalice and show it. At least he had oriented you in terms of family to belong to.

I will try to help you with these specimens but I will tell you that I move better in the Paleogene than in the Neogene.
I will investigate the matter but you make a detail of a well preserved corallite, that will help without a doubt.

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The Cyathoseris is gorgeous! I'm sorry I can't join in here as my only scleractinians are Jurassic. :)

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FranzBernhard
12 hours ago, oyo said:

I think you missed a great opportunity to show Hannes what he asked of you.

I had a close look at it, polished and unpolished - I did not see any details! Maybe I am unable to see the details, or there are no longer any details because of recrystallization. I don´t know, maybe its simply beyond my simple mind. 

12 hours ago, oyo said:

I will try to help you

Thank you very much, but please don´t put in some efforts any longer. Because I can not show any details.

Thanks again!
Franz Bernhard

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6 hours ago, FranzBernhard said:

I had a close look at it, polished and unpolished - I did not see any details! Maybe I am unable to see the details, or there are no longer any details because of recrystallization. I don´t know, maybe its simply beyond my simple mind. 

Thank you very much, but please don´t put in some efforts any longer. Because I can not show any details.

Thanks again!
Franz Bernhard

Ah no, don´t worry, is not an effort for me. Just a review of the literature.

Acanthastrea is a good guess but literature reports other genus with this type of external morphology in this geologic time. Caulastrea, Cladocora and Mussismilia also can be a good guess, perhaps any more.

In fact it is possible that in these materials that you present to us there is more than one genre.

I hope I have been of some help and thank you very much for participating in this post. Your corals are very nice, especially those Siderastrea colony.

Greetings.

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FranzBernhard
4 hours ago, oyo said:

Ah no, don´t worry, is not an effort for me.

Ok, thanks!

 

I had Mussismilia already on my radar, will have a look at the other ones, many thanks!

 

4 hours ago, oyo said:

In fact it is possible that in these materials that you present to us there is more than one genre.

That would be fascinating! This "coral pens" are restricted to two spots very small spots, immediately adjacent to them you can find Montastraea etc. 

 

Here is a field trip report describing the site with the "coral pens" somewhat and with some general background information:

 

4 hours ago, oyo said:

I hope I have been of some help

Oh yes, many thanks!

 

4 hours ago, oyo said:

thank you very much for participating in this post.

You are welcome! But where are all the other corals, eg. from Florida ;)?

 

4 hours ago, oyo said:

Your corals are very nice, especially those Siderastrea colony.

Thanks! These are all surface finds, just picked from the ground.

Franz Bernhard

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1 hour ago, FranzBernhard said:

You are welcome! But where are all the other corals, eg. from Florida ;)?

Waiting for those from Florida, the French, the Italians .......... and since we have talked about Cladocora ........

Cladocora prolifera (d´Achiardi, 1866) Priabonian South Pyrenean basin

 

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FranzBernhard

Nicely preserved Cladocora! Thanks for sharing. Whats the size of the corallites? They seem to be quite large.

Btw, meanwhile I have found out that Caulastrea is mentioned from the Austrian Leithakalk-formation (Langhian).

Franz Bernhard

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1 hour ago, FranzBernhard said:

Nicely preserved Cladocora! Thanks for sharing. Whats the size of the corallites? They seem to be quite large.

The Cladocora corallites at this particular site are unusually large, the largest reaching 10-12 mm. It are generally smaller but in this site Cladocora colonies reaching sizes unusually large and corallites are in the same relationship.

 

1 hour ago, FranzBernhard said:

Btw, meanwhile I have found out that Caulastrea is mentioned from the Austrian Leithakalk-formation (Langhian).

From my own experience I tell you that the fact that a genus appears in the literature indicates its presence in the area. That a genus does not appear in literature only means that until the moment of that literary appointment it was not known in the area but not necessarily that it is not present. There are many articles whose title begins: "First occurrence ........... etc .....".

 

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Today's specimen.

Astrocoenia numisma (Defrance, 1826). Bartonian, South Pyrenean basin. Type species from genus Astrocoenia Milne Edwards & Haime, 1848.

25 mms. diameter large specimen / 16 mms. diameter medium specimen / 11 mms. diameter small specimen.

 

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I would like to thank everyone who has participated in this post in some way.

@FranzBernhard, @TqB, @grandpa, @ricardo, @Ruger9a, @minnbuckeye, @Fossildude19.
How can it be otherwise, I am going to do it by giving you another coral. I hope you enjoy it.

Siderofungia hemisphaerica (d´Achiardi, 1875) Bartonian, South Pyrenean basin.

 

 

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