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Fossilized Shark Tooth Type found Missouri


MOGARDE

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Hello,

 

We found this small fossilized shark's tooth on the Missouri River near St. Louis, MO and were hoping to get some help on identifying the type of shark.  Thank You!

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Its very worn but the surprisng part is it was found in Missouri! The only way I can see it is if it was transported here by someone and then they lost it, not sure what the river looks like there but maybe a family went to the east coast, found it and then put it in some sand supplies that they didn't get back out til today in the Missouri river of course its all speculation but its fun to make up a story :)

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Hm. I’ve read that Cretaceous fossils have been found in glacial gravel deposits in Missouri, so there is a possibility that this tooth is from a similar deposit.

 

Heres a link that describes a Squalicorax tooth found in Missouri:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/266657654_A_Cretaceous_Shark_Tooth_in_Glacial_Debris_of_Middle_Missouri

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Petalodus12
10 hours ago, MOGARDE said:

Thank you for the link, I am reading it now.

You’re welcome, hopefully it helps:)

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Bullsnake

Can you get a picture of the root from the bottom?

If it's flat, and more disk shaped, I was thinking it may be a large cladodont tooth probably eroded from a carboniferous deposit.

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Petalodus12
3 hours ago, Bullsnake said:

Can you get a picture of the root from the bottom?

If it's flat, and more disk shaped, I was thinking it may be a large cladodont tooth probably eroded from a carboniferous deposit.

To me it looks more Lamniform but that’s pretty much just a guess.

 

 And also, in my experience shark teeth from Carboniferous deposits don’t last super long outside of the matrix, especially in a setting like a river. That’s been my experience from deposits out east, though I’m not sure if it applies to Midwestern shark teeth as well. 

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deutscheben

It does not look like a Carboniferous tooth to me, in shape or preservation (from an Illinois perspective).

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