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OregonFossil

Need some ID help on this one. Eocene, Keasey Formation, and an inclusion or something inside a concretion. Size of the whole piece is 12 x 15 cm, weighs about 6 pounds.

 

Image 1 - Mollusk on top of something that has included into the matrix

Keasey-1.thumb.jpg.eac0923877687e8b82f6cbbfff9b3dac.jpg

 

#2 is a close up of the mollusk and surrounding area

Keasey-5.thumb.jpg.688262b8fef1443c67af2b441da0bb1d.jpg

 

Closeup of the inclusion material

Keasey-3.thumb.jpg.bc760dd6cc1ebc3dc9f85beaf7ff293d.jpg

 

More images to follow.

 

 

Edited by OregonFossil
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OregonFossil

Layer surrounding the inclusion:

Keasey-4.thumb.jpg.fb81dc6213ad889bbf6cfb53400c0aab.jpg

Another closeup of the inclusion:

Keasey-6.thumb.jpg.0b0185056baef5059047e87d55ed80db.jpg

 

Interesting intersection of the outer layers and the inclusion:

Keasey-7.thumb.jpg.6d044012230425bcce83bfee681f7d50.jpg

 

Anyone know what the inclusion is? I am thinking maybe a coral?

 

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  • Fossildude19 changed the title to Mollusck and something else I think
Fossildude19

Looks like it is just part of the concretion, to me. :unsure: 

 

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Hello,

 

I think it s a geological feature, not a fossil.

 

greetings Walter

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  • Fossildude19 changed the title to Mollusk and something else I think
OregonFossil

Here are two replies from PhD's:

 

Rock ID from photos is tricky, but my best guess is a bivalve (the white area) surrounded by an "aureole" of mineral precipitation caused by original animals decay in the sediment. This is definitely a guess though! Very fascinating rock — it also looks like a concretion that has split in half. 

 

This looks like a partial shell or shells of some kind of bivalved mollusk in a concretion, which is not uncommon in the Keasey Formation. The surrounding textured material looks like dendrites and/or diagenetic minerals and/or is from later weathering, not fossil material. Fun find!

 

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