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My first visit to Post Oak Creek-part 1


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A lot of what I learned from the trip, was learned here on the Forum. Thank you very much!! Went 1/2 of a day on Saturday, and 1/2 Day on Monday. 5 hour drive from South Texas but worth it. Made the trip with family, they have finds of their own. Not sure of what I have found here. Any help with identifications would be appreciated. The shark teeth are in rows of 8. Part 2 and possibly Part 3, will be posted later plus our first trip to NSR!!

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ThePhysicist

Looks like a successful trip! The first two teeth pictured in the first 3 pics are Ptychodus whipplei, a "crusher shark," very cool. 

 

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Actually the 4th on the top row could be Cretoxyrhina, but not sure with only one pic, and it's not in the best shape. In pics 5-8, they look like rocks to me. The remainder are bone, likely mammal (from the Pleistocene or even modern).

 

Look forward to seeing your other finds!

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Thank you so much!!!! With your help, I am just blown away that I have that many different species. Here are some close up shots of tooth #4. Maybe it will help with positive identification. My son found about the same number of teeth, but some are better examples. My daughter and him found the two Ptychodus whipplei. I will post his later tonight.

 

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ThePhysicist

You're welcome. Ok, more sure that this is also Cretodus, likely C. crassidens. POC has quite the diversity of animals, it's still amazing to me to see how many predators were living together. Next time if you bring home a bag of gravel, you'll find even more cool stuff; it would be something fun for the kids to do at home with a magnifying glass. :look:

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As we were leaving, we noticed that the creek ran through a golf course before it went under the highway. Are teeth found in that area as well, or is it more concentrated by the Travis street location? We went downstream quite a ways but never upstream. Most of our finds were not far away from the bridge.

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ThePhysicist

I would think that teeth can be found throughout the creek; I haven't strayed far from the Travis St. bridge. However, I'm not sure of the legality of collecting in a portion of the creek that passes through the golf course, as it may be considered private property.

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I agree. Just got me thinking about our next road trip....... Should we explore upstream or continue our way downstream. Find the tooth!
 

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2 hours ago, Tunis said:

Find the tooth!
 

On the edge at about 10:00.

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Fossil_finder_
4 hours ago, Tunis said:

Find the tooth!

I'm not sure why but me looking for the tooth made my day a little better, it was kind of fun :D 

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Great finds! Like @ThePhysicist said, some of the later pictures look to be bone, probably mammal and probably Pleistocene (Ice Age) by the look of it. Although the creek is most well-known for the Cretaceous deposits from which the shark teeth originate, there are also layers of much younger geology sitting on top that erode into the water as well. Picture 11 in particular is a calcaneum, or heel bone. It looks similar to extinct horse and bison calcanea that I've found before here close to Houston, but unless yours is at least several inches long those are probably unlikely IDs. 

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