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yardrockpaleo

Hello everyone, sorry to be posting so much Florissant fossil quarry material, but I'm going through my collection of foliage and still need these ID'd. Most of these leaves are obviously pretty common, but I can't find some of them in the book Fossils of Florissant. So here they are:

 

1. Think it's a Fagopsis, but just double checking.

2. Don't really know, feeding traces around the edges.

IMG_6212.jpg

IMG_6214.jpg

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yardrockpaleo

3. Really cool compound leaf:

4. Lots of margin feeding on this one. Morus?

Thanks everybody!

IMG_6213.jpg

IMG_6215 (1).jpg

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yardrockpaleo
19 hours ago, yardrockpaleo said:

IMG_6214.jpg

It just occurred to me: could this be a willow?

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Compare this specimen with: Athyana haydenii mail?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmail.yimg.com%2Fok%2Fu%2Fassets%2Fimg%2Femoticons%2Femo71.gif&t=1611697987&ymreqid=23281213-8dc1-3cff-1c45-6b0060016500&sig=D5IW.Q_EYhgHGLKgxyztFA--~D

 

image.thumb.png.83d8f1279a9aaa2beab6bafacd5b9461.png

 

MacGinitie, H.D. 1953
Fossil Plants of the Florissant Beds, Colorado.
Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication, 599:1-198

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yardrockpaleo
11 minutes ago, piranha said:

Compare this specimen with: Athyana haydenii mail?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmail.yimg.com%2Fok%2Fu%2Fassets%2Fimg%2Femoticons%2Femo71.gif&t=1611697987&ymreqid=23281213-8dc1-3cff-1c45-6b0060016500&sig=D5IW.Q_EYhgHGLKgxyztFA--~D

 

image.thumb.png.83d8f1279a9aaa2beab6bafacd5b9461.png

 

MacGinitie, H.D. 1953
Fossil Plants of the Florissant Beds, Colorado.
Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication, 599:1-198

Oh wow, that's really similar. Only difference I can spot is the athyana's leaves have sharper edges/serrations (whatever you call them) than mine.

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yardrockpaleo

And Athyana has been found there a lot according to 'Phytogeography of the late Eocene Florissant flora reconsidered'.

 

"compound leaves of Athyana from Florissant seems reasonable..."

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yardrockpaleo

Actually, I changed my mind. I think I would be very comfortable labeling it Athyana Haydenii after seeing the lowest leaf on the left in the black and white pic. The margins on the leaf have the exact same shape. Ok, thanks @piranha! One down, three to go.

 
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Top Trilo

For #4 I think we need a clearer photo because I can't tell if it is missing those sections due to feeding or if it is just covered by some paper thin layers

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yardrockpaleo
Just now, Top Trilo said:

For #4 I think we need a clearer photo because I can't tell if it is missing those sections due to feeding or if it is just covered by some paper thin layers

I can tell you it's feeding marks because of the thickened tissue around the marks, but I will have better pics coming up.

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yardrockpaleo

Here are the pictures of the really eaten-up one.

IMG-3451.JPG

IMG-3450.JPG

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Top Trilo

With the pictures it is really hard to see if the leaf has been eaten or is covered by more rock but I'll take your word that its eaten. As far as the Morus Symmetrica example you showed, you really have to look at the parts that are complete in your specimen like at the base of the leaf. In the Morus example it is much more flat and perpindicular to the stem (assuming the leaf is perserved completely flat not bent like the right leaf in the example) like a capital T shape but your specimen appears to be more of a Y shape. I'll search through my book and see if I can see any matches but its hard to idenitfy as it is incomplete.

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yardrockpaleo
3 minutes ago, Top Trilo said:

With the pictures it is really hard to see if the leaf has been eaten or is covered by more rock but I'll take your word that its eaten. As far as the Morus Symmetrica example you showed, you really have to look at the parts that are complete in your specimen like at the base of the leaf. In the Morus example it is much more flat and perpindicular to the stem (assuming the leaf is perserved completely flat not bent like the right leaf in the example) like a capital T shape but your specimen appears to be more of a Y shape. I'll search through my book and see if I can see any matches but its hard to idenitfy as it is incomplete.

Yeah, I knew it was a long shot with this one. Let me know if you get a match.

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Top Trilo

It may be of the genus staphylea, (on page 107) I Chose that over the family Lauraceae (page 90 because of the thicker stem.

 

#2 looks very similar to an elm leaf, family ulmaceae (page 100)

Edit: See image below

Leaf of Cedrelospermum lineatum (an extinct genus in the family... |  Download Scientific Diagram

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yardrockpaleo
17 hours ago, Top Trilo said:

It may be of the genus staphylea, (on page 107) I Chose that over the family Lauraceae (page 90 because of the thicker stem.

 

#2 looks very similar to an elm leaf, family ulmaceae (page 100)

Edit: See image below

Leaf of Cedrelospermum lineatum (an extinct genus in the family... |  Download Scientific Diagram

Yeah, the staphylea makes sense for the eaten-up one. But the other one doesn't quite match ulmaceae. It matches more of a willow, like this living one:

white-willow-leaf1.jpg

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Top Trilo
6 minutes ago, yardrockpaleo said:

Yeah, the staphylea makes sense for the eaten-up one. But the other one doesn't quite match ulmaceae. It matches more of a willow, like this living one:

 

Can you take a brighter photo of it? I didn't go with willow because the ridges on the edge of the leaf of a willow appear to be much smaller than yours but the secondary veins would help most and they are hard to see in that photo

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yardrockpaleo

Here's some better pics, including the whole hash plate of it, some spore thing (cercocarpus?), and Koelreuteria Allenii.

IMG-3455.JPG

IMG-3454.JPG

IMG-3453.JPG

IMG-3452.JPG

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Top Trilo

thanks for the extra photos, I would stick with an elm leaf, one of the major differences between that and the willow is the secondary veins. on the elm leaf they tend to go in a straight line to the edge but in willow leaves, including the live one you showed, they curve up and travel farther down the leaf

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yardrockpaleo

I suppose I'll post one more here: Supposedly this is seaweed, but I'm not so sure. I haven't found any records about seaweed at Florissant. The shale is exactly 2.8 inches long. Anyone seen anything similar to this? Thanks!

 

IMG-3462.JPG

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IMG-3460.JPG

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yardrockpaleo

I just discovered that leaf #1 is Cercocarpus myricaefolius. Still no luck on finding a single mention of seaweed at Florissant, though.:headscratch:

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Top Trilo
1 hour ago, yardrockpaleo said:

I just discovered that leaf #1 is Cercocarpus myricaefolius. Still no luck on finding a single mention of seaweed at Florissant, though.:headscratch:

doubt it is sea weed but no idea what it is

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yardrockpaleo
1 minute ago, Top Trilo said:

doubt it is sea weed but no idea what it is

Yeah, I'm stumped. I went through every plant on the idigpaleo collection (https://idigpaleo.org/, very useful) and I haven't found a match. I need to make a trip up to Florissant...

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