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Thomas.Dodson

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Thomas.Dodson

Greetings everyone. I collected this pretty little tooth on one of my Summerville, SC trips when I lived in Georgia. It's escaped scrutiny until now. While it unfortunately lacks the root the uniqueness has made me pursue an ID anyway, although it might not be possible. I have considered a serrated Alopias grandis based on the depth, irregular serrations, and overall shape. I've also considered a juvenile Otodus angustidens but I'm having difficulty finding good examples so a lot of comparisons are instead made with other Otodus species. I'd be interested in seeing what others think.

 

@sixgill pete @Al Dente @MarcoSr I know you all had input for a similar thread a few years ago and I'd appreciate your thoughts.

Alopias.png

Alopias2.png

alopias3.png

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Thomas.Dodson

Looking into it more it appears that although Alopias grandis is reported from the Chandler Bridge the serrate form is only reported from the Miocene.

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ThePhysicist

I'm not very familiar with threshers, but this one looks like Carcharhinus sp. to me. The serrations look pretty large, so I'm not certain. 

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Thomas.Dodson
36 minutes ago, ThePhysicist said:

I'm not very familiar with threshers, but this one looks like Carcharhinus sp. to me. The serrations look pretty large, so I'm not certain. 

It does resemble some stockier toothed Carcharhinus species but the only Carcharhinus Chandler Bridge species reported (at least by Cicimurri and Knight) is C. gibessi which is smaller and has a nonserrated crown. I have heard of teeth from other formations washing into the Chandler Bridge deposits though.

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Thomas.Dodson

The second question directed at people familiar with Sawmill Branch is how often does other other material wash in? Looking only at Chandler Bridge species the possibilities are limited but if it originated from somewhere else the options open up a bit.

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FossilDAWG

I can't answer your specific question, but I can say that I have collected a fairly typical Calvert Formation (Miocene) Isurus tooth at Douglas Point MD (Paleocene), and I was told by MarcoSr and others that it is not as rare as you would think for careless collectors to dump fossils where they could cause confusion.

 

Don

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