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Ideas for hammer sheaths or DIY guard for the chisel end


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I'm trying to upgrade the way I pack my hammer, a Plumb 24oz brick hammer.  Right now I use the hammer holster off my carpenter's belt.  I don't have them right here so I will borrow pics from marketers (see end of post).   One option is to find a full sized sheath like maybe the Estwing 23 and another is to do what I am already doing, just with a cover on the chisel end,   So I have two questions......

 

(1)  If you use a full sized sheath, and you're regularly reaching for your hammer, do you keep the flap snapped down, or will the hammer ride ok with the flap loose?    

(2)  Do you know of products or DIY designs for some sort of guard for the chisel end?  It needs to be super secure when the tool is bouncing on my hip and super easy to remove when I want to pry at something.   

 

Either option needs to remain on the tool when its packed away in storage.

 

Thanks

 

I have this hammer

PLUMB HAMMER SS 24OZ BRICK - Picks and Riveting/Chipping Hammers -  PLBSS24BHN | SS24BHN - Grainger, Canada

and right now use a hammer holster similar to this (the claw hammer stays home)

Leather Hammer Holster / Hammer Holder - Buy Hammer Holder,Leather Hammer  Holder,Hammer Holster Product on Alibaba.com

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  • SteveE changed the title to Ideas for hammer sheaths or DIY guard for the chisel end
Fossildude19

I use the type of holster you use. 

I don't have a guard for the chisel end, and have never found one necessary.   :shrug:

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2 minutes ago, Fossildude19 said:

I don't have a guard for the chisel end, and have never found one necessary. 

 

May it always be so!   But it isn't just for when I'm carrying it, I also want to cover the chisel when its packed away or rolling around behind my truck seat, just so it doesn't chew up other gear.   I already have a jury-rigged tape and cardboard thingie, but it would be nice to add that margin of safety for when I fall on a scramble with the thing on my hip

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I just carry it in hand. I have the same tool belt holster, but found it cumbersome if I was scrambling up steep rock piles. I'll generally carry the hand sledge and brick hammer in one hand, chisel in the other. 

 

In terms of padding it for transport, if you have a padded backpack, that might work. Alternatively, you could wrap it in a tough old towel or rag. Another solution is obtain one of those cheap plastic containers large enough to store the hammer when it is in the back seat. 

 

If you're worried about the chisel end digging into you or other objects, get some paraffin wax. It is easily moulded, and it is similar to what is used to cover the sharp edge of the blade when you buy a fire axe.

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sagacious

Sharp tooltips like that are best covered with a section of stout tubing, slightly longer than the length of the chisel end.  Take the hammer to a hardware store that sells tubing of various sizes by the foot (washing machine tubing, etc) and find a size that will just barely slide over the chisel end.  Sometimes a piece of garden hose will work. 

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FossilNerd

I agree with @Fossildude19 and @Kane and use a mix of both tactics.

 

I usually keep my hammer in hand as I scramble around. Often using it as a make shift hand hold by sticking the pick\chisel (depending on which hammer I am using) in the ground, or using it it pull that fossil towards me that is just out of reach. 
 

If I do need both hands, I have a belt holster like you that hangs from my pack. I’ll slip it in that for the time being. 
 

12 hours ago, sagacious said:

Sharp tooltips like that are best covered with a section of stout tubing, slightly longer than the length of the chisel end.  Take the hammer to a hardware store that sells tubing of various sizes by the foot (washing machine tubing, etc) and find a size that will just barely slide over the chisel end.  Sometimes a piece of garden hose will work. 

 

I do this with my woodcarving knives and it works well when storing them. I don’t see why it wouldn’t work for storing the hammer. Modified to fit the chisel of course.

 

9B005BDD-6F22-4B55-A161-0D97FFD0BB84.thumb.jpeg.9f60c3ab633f63a751f362ce7d1178a2.jpeg

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Thomas.Dodson
16 hours ago, sagacious said:

Sharp tooltips like that are best covered with a section of stout tubing, slightly longer than the length of the chisel end.  Take the hammer to a hardware store that sells tubing of various sizes by the foot (washing machine tubing, etc) and find a size that will just barely slide over the chisel end.  Sometimes a piece of garden hose will work. 

This is easy, cheap, and works well. I haven't used it for chisels or hammers as I haven't found it necessary but I have used tubing to cover large hooks and the likes in fishing tackle making storage easier.

 

I've been trying out a tool backpack with slots that my hammers fit in. It keeps them pretty secure and doesn't bang against the other hammers or chisels. If I feel like I'm going to be using the hammer a lot I just carry it in hand.

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Fossilis Willis

Back in my framing days some of the fellas I worked with opted to keep their hammers upside down in their nail pouch handle side up, rather than keep in the hammer hoop. This could be a handy alternative so long as the pouch is deep enough. It should stay put while scrambling around, offer a bit of protection and be easy to take out and put back. You could even find one with slots for chisels and whatnot.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Ptychodus04

I throw all my tools and a water bottle into a 5 gallon bucket. Easy access and easy to carry. Plus, it gives you a convenient chair to sit on if you get tired.

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I am also in the no holster camp.  Mine is always in my hand as I wander the landscape.  If I have to carry out a big rock that takes two hands, then I just stuff the hammer in the backpack away from my back so I don't stab myself.  I have found the hanging hammer to be  more bothersome than useful. 

 

But back in my framing days, I also kept my hammer in my pouch handle up, ready to grab.  

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Ptychodus04
22 minutes ago, jpc said:

But back in my framing days, I also kept my hammer in my pouch handle up, ready to grab. 

Back in my framing days, we used nail guns more than hammers. :P

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18 minutes ago, Ptychodus04 said:

Back in my framing days, we used nail guns more than hammers. :P

I'll bet you use an electric toothbrush, too.    : )

My framing days are limited to a single cabin update in Michigan in 1998.  Great fun and I learned a lot.   I worked in a furniture factory before that.  We used power drills as screwdrivers there.  I have since framed/floored/drywalled two prep labs in the garage.... both with screwdriverdrills, not a nail gun.  Simply cuz I don't own one.

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LabRatKing
On 3/20/2021 at 11:34 AM, SteveE said:

I'm trying to upgrade the way I pack my hammer, a Plumb 24oz brick hammer.  Right now I use the hammer holster off my carpenter's belt.  I don't have them right here so I will borrow pics from marketers (see end of post).   One option is to find a full sized sheath like maybe the Estwing 23 and another is to do what I am already doing, just with a cover on the chisel end,   So I have two questions......

 

(1)  If you use a full sized sheath, and you're regularly reaching for your hammer, do you keep the flap snapped down, or will the hammer ride ok with the flap loose?    

(2)  Do you know of products or DIY designs for some sort of guard for the chisel end?  It needs to be super secure when the tool is bouncing on my hip and super easy to remove when I want to pry at something.   

 

Either option needs to remain on the tool when its packed away in storage.

 

Thanks

 

I have this hammer

PLUMB HAMMER SS 24OZ BRICK - Picks and Riveting/Chipping Hammers -  PLBSS24BHN | SS24BHN - Grainger, Canada

and right now use a hammer holster similar to this (the claw hammer stays home)

Leather Hammer Holster / Hammer Holder - Buy Hammer Holder,Leather Hammer  Holder,Hammer Holster Product on Alibaba.com

I use the nylon belt sheath from a Mag Lite brand flashlight on the sharp point of my gad pry so as not to stab myself when hiking around. For my geology pick, I slide a section of old garden hose over it to keep it from tearing my pack. For my masons hammer, as you have pictured, I don’t bother. It doesn’t and shouldn’t have a sharp edge. I never use belt hoops anymore as they always result in torn shirts and forearms.

 

however, for sites I know I need lots of tools, I spent 15 bucks on a harness and strap for a 5 gallon bucket...makes it easy to carry finds and tools!

image.thumb.jpeg.02d3ca9386df54bd5f1bd4d460703aca.jpeg

 

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Ptychodus04
3 hours ago, jpc said:

I'll bet you use an electric toothbrush, too.    : )

My framing days are limited to a single cabin update in Michigan in 1998.  Great fun and I learned a lot.   I worked in a furniture factory before that.  We used power drills as screwdrivers there.  I have since framed/floored/drywalled two prep labs in the garage.... both with screwdriverdrills, not a nail gun.  Simply cuz I don't own one.

I prefer to use no toothbrush at all. :default_rofl:

 

I prefer screws to nails as a general rule anyway.

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  • 3 months later...

I have one of these leather sheaths for my rock pick. When the hammer is in my rucksack it keeps the pointy part covered and when I need the hammer close at hand it has a belt loop.

Screen Shot 2021-07-19 at 8.17.19 PM.png

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On 4/9/2021 at 9:56 AM, Ptychodus04 said:

I throw all my tools and a water bottle into a 5 gallon bucket. Easy access and easy to carry. Plus, it gives you a convenient chair to sit on if you get tired.


I added one of these tool organizers to my 5 gallon bucket. It’s all I used before getting my backpack. It still comes along with me and carries extra tools that I may or may not need. 

 

They are dirt cheap and can be found on the inter webs or at most big box hardware/lumber type stores. 
 

Although…it may not be the best option if you flip your bucket over for a seat very often. :zzzzscratchchin: 


83BD5A7D-ACDA-4546-BB42-F0508FCD92D3.thumb.jpeg.95d0c01c06ba347d2a147f6151d34236.jpeg

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