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Is this a fossil?


Stephen Tirone

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Stephen Tirone

Another "is this a fossil" question. 

Found in Slippery Rock Creek, in McConnell's Mill State Park, Pennsylvania. 

Looks to me like one of those old very old trees with the cross-hatched bark like a pineapple that I recall from my early childhood books. 

Am I way off?  Hoping the links below work.   -Steve

 

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Top Trilo

I believe this is a carboniferous tree branch, likely Lepidodendron sp. due to the diamond pattern. And It is always best to directly upload the photos instead of links.

 

 

image.png.7c9f434f0ad6a81faafa1dc11e121f37.png

 

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Stephen Tirone

Thank you for the quick reply, Top Trilo.  I was posting my question before I had joined the Forum, so it didn't let me upload anything -- not that I could see, anyway.  I see it is much easier now that I am a member.  Hopefully I will get a chance to post some more photos of other fossils in the future!  


Thanks again,

 Steve

 

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fossilnut

Second lepidodendron. Ist time I have every seen anyone on TFF mention Slippery Rock Creek and McConnells Mills. I grew up in Ellwood City Pa. My dad would take me fishing in the Slippery Rock Creek. Great small mouth bass fishing but I mostly got bait for my dad (crayfish) or we would seine  for helgrammites. In a few days I'll be 80 so this just brought back some memories. I still have a piece of stigmaria from the same area. Have you every hunted in the Vanport limestone?

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Stephen Tirone

I have not heard of the Vanport limestone, and I am not a fossil hunter, though I am now getting the bug!  We were hiking the SR Gorge Trail and paused at the creek just down from the Eckert bridge, and this fossil was just laying there, exposed.  Very cool.  Previous to this, I thought only small crinoids were possible around here.  

 

It was a beautiful day to be there.  Attached is a pic of the water at Walnut Flats. 

 

-Steve

 

wf.jpg

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fossilnut

The greater Pittsburgh area should have a many different types of fossils from marine sediments to the ferns and other Pennsylvanian aged fossils. I am sure their is a fossil club in the area. That would be a good way to get started and find locations to hunt. It is a fascinating hobby because you never know what you may find and you are the first person to see it!. I just got back from NMB, SC where I found 2 fossil horse teeth Pleistocene, a sea urchin Cretaceous, a great white shark tooth probably Pliocene and a Quahog (Mercenaria) shell with some small blister pearls. First time I was able to hunt for many months. Was a lot of fun. Best wishes to you. Tom

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Petalodus12

Hello from a fellow Western Pennsylvanian! I agree with the Lepidodendron ID; they are quite common in the Pottsville Formation, which is the rock unit that Slippery Rock Creek cuts through in the park. 

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