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Hello, new here, can anyone please ID this for me?


Jerrytinsley1

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Jerrytinsley1

Found in WNY (Brocton) on land, in the woods , about 4 miles away from the shoreline of lake erie. 

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GeschWhat

Does it float?

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Thomas.Dodson

Looks like a large piece of a Favositid coral.

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Tidgy's Dad

I think it's pumice. 

Hello, Jerry, and a very warm welcome to TFF from Morocco. :)

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Thomas.Dodson
1 hour ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

I think it's pumice. 

Hello, Jerry, and a very warm welcome to TFF from Morocco. :)

In retrospect It is a bit unusual that no tabulae or corallites in cross show. Thankfully it's easy to find out.

I'd check to see if it floats as GeschWhat mentioned.

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DPS Ammonite

To rule out coral completely, we need to see a cross section.
 

Does it float? If so then pumice is likely. Frankly, it looks more like scoria, (vesicular lava) Less likely is pisolite where some of the exterior pisoliths have dissolved or fallen out. Hack a corner out. It if is solid then pisolite is likely. If vuggy then scoria is likely.

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/geologyscience.com/rocks/scoria/

 

https://m.minerals.net/mineral_glossary/pisolite.aspx

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FossilDAWG

The holes are clearly bubbles in the original rock, consistent with pumice or a similar inorganic material.  The shape of the holes (no hexagonal structure anywhere), the extreme variation in size of the holes, the lack of any septa or tabulae, all exclude identification as a coral.

 

Don

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Jerrytinsley1

Well, to my surprise, as heavy as it feels, it does in fact float.

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Tidgy's Dad
27 minutes ago, Jerrytinsley1 said:

Well, to my surprise, as heavy as it feels, it does in fact float.

Yup.

It's pumice and really interesting why it floats; it's not as simple as just containing lots of gas vesicles.

https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/news/solving-mystery-floating-rocks-pumice#:~:text=Pumice stones.,-Credit%3A Berkeley Lab&text=While scientists have known that,for example%2C it will sink.

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FranzBernhard
7 hours ago, Jerrytinsley1 said:

WNY (Brocton) on land

 

3 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

consistent with pumice or a similar inorganic material.

As it does not really look like typical pumice, my question is, is pumice known from that general area?

 

I am leaning more to "similar inorganic material", that means, something man-made.

 

Franz Bernhard

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oilshale

Could be lightweight concrete. What is the pore size?

1473901356_lightweightconcrete.JPG.8ee77a67f21fb884d07a4487f54af0b3.JPG

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