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Unknown Fossil Found in Bottle Dump


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Philip Tovell

Hello,

 

I'm  very new to this, so I hope I get things right here. Can anyone help me identify  this? I found it in an old bottle-dump near Selkirk in the Scottish Borders that dates back to the 1960s. It's on the broken edge of a stone slab but from what I can see it measures about 5.7 cm across. Is it some kind of shell?

 

If anyone needs more info I'd  be happy to give it. Thanks in advance!

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Rockwood

I think so. A sectional view. Brachiopod would be my first guess. Bivalve second.

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I think this is mineral rather than fossil.  That is my 1 1/2 cents. 

 

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Rockwood
53 minutes ago, jpc said:

I think this is mineral rather than fossil.  That is my 1 1/2 cents. 

 

I could be biased by the walk I took along the south shore of Long Pond Stream the other day. Glacial drift has spread a dense layer of brachiopods along it, and they are often exposed in lateral view as molds.   

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FranzBernhard

Welcome to TFF from Austria!

 

Intriguing thing!

What is the rock itself? Is it a limestone? Would you like to try if it fizzes with vinegar - please test all dark parts and all bright parts individually.

 

As this rock is slabbed, it seems it has/had some commercial use. Have you seen similar rocks around somewhere in buildings, pavements etc? It can not be excluded that this is a well-known rock in your area.

 

@TqB, @Tidgy's Dad - Thanks!

 

Franz Bernhard

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Thomas.Dodson

I agree with Jpc. The contours of the supposed sectional view are just too irregular to my eyes; even for a sectional view of a worn internal mold.

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Philip Tovell
On 6/8/2021 at 6:06 AM, FranzBernhard said:

Welcome to TFF from Austria!

 

Intriguing thing!

What is the rock itself? Is it a limestone? Would you like to try if it fizzes with vinegar - please test all dark parts and all bright parts individually.

 

As this rock is slabbed, it seems it has/had some commercial use. Have you seen similar rocks around somewhere in buildings, pavements etc? It can not be excluded that this is a well-known rock in your area.

 

@TqB, @Tidgy's Dad - Thanks!

 

Franz Bernhard

I have no idea what kind of rock it is, I'm afraid. I've been trying to figure it out but I don't know much about geology. I did try the vinegar test - no fizzing anywhere. I can't say that I've noticed this type of rock being used commercially locally as I haven't been paying attention, but I think it might be common.

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FranzBernhard
13 minutes ago, Philip Tovell said:

no fizzing anywhere.

So it is not a limestone, strongly reducing the possibility that the structure in question is a fossil.

And thanks for the test and extra infos! 

Franz Bernhard

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Philip Tovell
On 6/7/2021 at 11:33 PM, jpc said:

I think this is mineral rather than fossil. 

 

I'm very new to geology and fossil id. Could you please explain why you think it's a mineral? What things should I look out for to spot the difference in the future?

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Rockwood
2 minutes ago, Philip Tovell said:

What things should I look out for to spot the difference in the future?

The shape typically  has a more crisp outline. There may be ridges or curves, but the waviness and ghostlike shape is off. 

The shell is most often composed of a form of calcium carbonate which normally would react with an acid. The look seen here is closest to that type of preservation, the lack of a reaction would tend to narrow the odds of this being a preserved shell. 

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Philip Tovell
9 minutes ago, Rockwood said:

The shape typically  has a more crisp outline. There may be ridges or curves, but the waviness and ghostlike shape is off. 

The shell is most often composed of a form of calcium carbonate which normally would react with an acid. The look seen here is closest to that type of preservation, the lack of a reaction would tend to narrow the odds of this being a preserved shell. 

Thanks for all the helpful and interesting info. It's very much appreciated. I thought this might have been the first fossil I've found so I'm a little bummed that it's not, but even so, the things I've learned because of that has made it worth it.

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Bone Daddy

It's not a septarian nodule, but the banding reminds me of those seen in septarians. Could be something formed with similar processes.

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