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Gastropods Of The Galena Formation


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This is something I've thought about doing for a while but just haven't gotten around to it. Since I'm always forgetting the names of gastropods I collect, I decided to put them here as a reminder to myself and possibly a resource for others I'm still working on getting positive ID's for more, but here is what I have ID'd so far.

Galena Formation

Prosser and Stewartville members

(Wise Lake Formation equivilant for those in Illinois)

Upper Ordovician

Southeast Minnesota

Maclurites crassa

post-3840-0-98105600-1350569637_thumb.jpg

Hormatoma major (still being prepped)

post-3840-0-65646400-1350569629_thumb.jpg

Liospira angustata

post-3840-0-35856500-1350569633_thumb.jpg post-3840-0-72622600-1350578901_thumb.jpg

Fusispira inflata

post-3840-0-61276500-1350569617_thumb.jpg

Sublulites sp.

post-3840-0-26201200-1350569641_thumb.jpg

Holopea pyrene

post-3840-0-68885400-1350569620_thumb.jpg

More to come as I get them ID'd and photographed.

Edited by Caleb
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I know this sounds dumb :), but I don't see the difference between the two snails.

Enlighten me pleasssse... :)

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I know this sounds dumb :), but I don't see the difference between the two snails.

Enlighten me pleasssse... :)

I'm assuming you're looking at the Maclurites and Liospira? I've added a side view of the Liospira to show that it has a low spire/conical shape. If you look at a Maclurites there is no rise with the whorls. The direction of the whorls are also different, Maclurites coils clockwise, and Liospira coils counterclockwise.

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Okay... dumb, dumb question...

If you turned the fossil the other way, wouldn't the coils be going in the opposite direction... ??? Hence the only way to tell the difference is the L one is "humped" up in the middle, right?

Please, patience with me...

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The backs look much different than the fronts, most of the whorls are obscured by the large bottom whorl.

Maclurites

post-3840-0-90243000-1350584418_thumb.jpg

Liospira

post-3840-0-09032600-1350584420_thumb.jpg

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Sooooo the pic I am using for an avatar is really a Liospira and not a Maclurite...

Does that work for the imprints of these snails too? Or would the imprints be the backs, or possibly the backs of the fronts...

So if I have this right, the back of the shell is bigger and kind of eclipses the whorl pattern...???

Bev :)

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Take that back, this snail is going clockwise and is flat... Am I right this time? :) LOL

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Take that back, this snail is going clockwise and is flat... Am I right this time? :) LOL

Yup, your avatar is a Maclurites.

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Hey, I have been examining my snails and they are all flat on the top. Are those L ones rare? Is flat on the top normal? Should the imprints be bumped in more to be an L? What if it is flat on the top and humped on the back, then it is an L?

And you know what, the Heratosa and the other one, the S one, look awefully similar...

Caleb, have you considered writing a booklet on fossils of SE MN? You could probably sell it at Forestville and over the net! Perhaps an ebook? Are you going to post this on your website? What forum are you putting this under? Have you thought of putting the similar gastropods side by side and explaining the differences in detail for dummies like me? Maybe a "Gastropods for Dummies"? I would buy your book :)

Just found my first crinoid! Got confirmed! Been looking for one for 6 months!

Bev :)

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Sweet snails caleb. Are alot of these present in the Platteville as well? Are you going to do the brachiopods next?

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Sweet snails caleb. Are alot of these present in the Platteville as well? Are you going to do the brachiopods next?

The Platteville has many of the same genera, but naturally different species. In order to keep my sanity, I'll leave the brachiopods for someone else. There are way too many of those for me to wrap my head around. I was thinking about doing this with Cephalopods next though, but only IDing most by genus. We'll see how that pans out this winter.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Lophospira sp.
post-3840-0-82184700-1352817945_thumb.jpg

Edited by Caleb
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Terry Dactyll

Caleb... Nice... That multislab is going to look fantastic when you finished it... Very nice finds...

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Northern Sharks

Call me crazy, but since we hunt in similar aged material, if I found that "Holopea", I'd call it a Lophospira. My Holopeas don't have that peak on the whorls

post-77-0-55494300-1352828918_thumb.jpg

Edited by Northern Sharks
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