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Some Of My Shark, Ray, Fish And Other Micros


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I have a pretty extensive collection of shark, ray, fish and other micros from sites all over the US, Europe, North Africa and Australia. You can see a very small part of my collection in my TFF posts at the below links. As I add new posts to TFF I'll update this list.

I want to thank Earl M. for organizing my micro posts as shown below, which is a much more useful listing than in my original post:

Paleozoic

Silurian

E. m. Silurian (Wenlockian) - Rochester Sh. – Niagara Co., New York

http://www.thefossil.../?hl=+new +york

Devonian

E. m. Devonian (Eifelian) – Columbus Lmst. – Columbus, Franklin Co., C. Ohio (see Martin, 2002)

http://www.thefossil...ork#entry441978 (placoid scales, bony fish teeth)

Lt. m. Devonian (Givetian) – Darien bed, Wanakah Sh., Ludlowville Fm., Hamilton Grp. – Bethany, Genesee Co., NW New York

http://www.thefossil.../?hl=+new +york

E. lt. Devonian (Frasnian) – North Evans Lmst. Mbr., Genesee Fm. – Hamburg, Erie Co., New York

http://www.thefossil.../?hl=+new +york

Mesozoic

Jurassic

M. m. Jurassic (Bathonian) – Great Oolite lmst. – England, U.K.

http://www.thefossil...united-kingdom/ (incl. Acrodus)

E. lt. Jurassic (Oxfordian) - Kellaways Clay, lw. Oxford Clay – Peterborough, England, U.K.

http://www.thefossil...o +sr +jurassic (onychites, bony fish teeth)

http://www.thefossil...art-2/?p=489587 (Protospinax, serpulid worm tubes, etc.)

http://www.thefossil...kingdom-part-3/ (more onychites, belemnites, serpulid worm tubes, Protospinax, Omatoscyllium)

Cretaceous

Early Cretaceous

Lt. E. (“m.”) Cret. (Albian) – Kiowa Sh. Fm., m. Dakota Grp. – Kansas

http://www.thefossil...ros#entry433986 (incl. Onchopristis dunklei)

Late Cretaceous

Lt. m. Cenomanian – Graneros Sh. Fm., basal Colorado Grp. – Kansas

http://www.thefossil...ansas/?p=507345

E. lt. Cenomanian – basal Lincoln Lmst. Mbr., basal Greenhorn Fm., lower Colorado Grp. (transgressive lag) – Kansas

http://www.thefossil...os-from-kansas/

http://www.thefossil...ansas/?p=507330 (Squalicorax falcatus; Onchopristis dunklei, Ptychodus decurrens, Rhinobatos; Enchodus petrosus)

Lt. m. Turonian – Blue Hill Sh. Mbr., m. Carlile Sh. Fm., m. Colorado Grp. (regressive) – Kansas (see Everhart et al., 2003)

http://www.thefossil...os-from-kansas/ (Chiloscyllium greeni, Scapanorhynchus r. raphiodon, Squalicorax falcatus; Ptychotrygon spp., Ischyrhiza m. schneideri, common Rhinobatos incertus)

http://www.thefossil...ros#entry437979

E. lt. Turonian – Codell Ss. Mbr., upper Carlile Sh. Fm., m. Colorado Grp. - Kansas

http://www.thefossil...os-from-kansas/ (Hybodus, Scapanorhynchus r. raphiodon; Ptychotrygon, Rhinobatos)

E. lt. Turonian – Turner Sandy Mbr., m. Codell Ss. Mbr., upper Carlile Fm., m. Colorado Grp. – Grant Co., NE South Dakota (see Stewart & Martin, 1993; Jorgensen and Larson, 1996; Lewis, 1999; & Lewis et al., 2000)

http://www.thefossil...o-south-dakota/ (Ptychotrygon, Ischyrhiza, Brachyrhizodus mcnultyi)

http://www.thefossil...-dakota-part-2/ (Squalicorax falcatus, Rhinobatos, Enchodus)

Latest Turonian (not e. Coniacian) – basal Atco Fm. (transgressive lag), basal Austin Grp. – TXI Q., Midlothian, Johnson Co., NE Texas (mostly a shallow-water fauna, except for the Ptychodus and Pseudocorax) (see Meyer, 1974; Welton & Farish, 1993)

http://www.thefossil...ros#entry417293 (Scapanorhynchus raphiodon, Onchopristis dunklei, Paralbula, Ptychotrygon)

http://www.thefossil...i-quarry-texas/ (Scapanorhynchus r. raphiodon, Squalicorax falcatus, Onchopristis dunklei, Ptychotrygon triangularis, Ischyrhiza m. schneideri, Hadrodus priscus, Paralbula)

Santonian – Hosta Tongue, Pt. Lookout Ss. – C. New Mexico (see Bourdon et al., 2011)

http://www.thefossil...rom-new-mexico/ (Hybodus, Squatina/Cedarstroemia/Columbusia, Cantioscyllium descipiens; Ptychotrygon, Ischyrhiza, Rhinobatos, Brachyrhizodus mcnulti, Ptychodus mortoni, assorted ray dermal denticles; Enchodus petrosus; juv. croc tooth crown)

Early Campanian – Menefee Fm., m. Mesa Verde Grp. – eastern San Juan Basin, Rio Arriba Co., NW New Mexico

http://www.thefossil...-of-new-mexico/

E. m. Campanian – basal Ozan Fm., basal Taylor Grp. – North Sulphur River?, Fannin Co., Texas (see McKinzie et al., 2001)

http://www.thefossil...ation-of-texas/ (Chiloscyllium greeni, Scyliorhinus, Odontaspis aculeatus, Carcharias holmdeli, Pseudocorax laevis, Squalicorax kaupi – mostly deep-water sharks)

http://www.thefossil...ation-of-texas/ (Ptychotrygon, Sclerorhynchus, Ischyrhiza; Rhinobatos)

http://www.thefossil...ation-of-texas/ (Hadrodus priscus branchials, Anomoeodus phaseolus prearticular (lw. toothplate) teeth, Enchodus petrosus dentary fangs, sm. dercetid scales, misl. bony fish teeth)

Campanian – hard chalk, Fm.? – Hallencourt, France

http://www.thefossil...ros#entry411927

(partial squid beak, centrodorsal ossicles of free-swimming comatulid crinoids, calcified chitin lobster claw knobs; Chiloscyllium, Squatirina kannensis, Anomotodon, Galeorhinus girardoti [usus. Maastr.], Paraorthacodus conicus, etc.)

Lt. Campanian – Kirtland & Fruitland fms. (estuarine/fluviatile) – New Mexico

http://www.thefossil...-of-new-mexico/ (with Myledaphus bipartitus, Protoplatyrhina renae, gar & croc)

Lt. Maastrichtian – Escondido Fm. – south Texas (see Case & Cappetta, 1997)

http://www.thefossil...ation-of-texas/

Cretaceous, Maastrichtian,Tchivoula Quarry, near Hinda, Congo

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/80695-micro-shark-ray-and-bony-fish-specimens-from-the-miocene-of-france-and-cretaceous-of-the-congo/

Cenozoic

Paleocene

Lt. Paleocene (Thanetian) – zone 4, Aquia Fm.– Maryland and Virginia (see Ward & Wiest, 1990)

http://www.thefossil...on-of-maryland/

http://www.thefossil...on-of-virginia/

Eocene

Eocene - Orangeburg Formation - LaFarge Quarry - Harleyville, South Carolina

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/82895-micro-shark-ray-and-fish-teeth-from-the-eocene-of-south-carolina/

E. Eocene (Ypresian) – Nanjemoy Fm. – Stafford Co., Virginia (see Ward & Wiest, 1990; Weems & Grimsley, 1999)

http://www.thefossil...ginia/?p=510087

L. Eocene - Chadron Formation - White River Group - Sioux County Nebraska (terrestrial)

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/66750-terrestrial-micros-from-the-eocene-chadron-formationoligocene-brule-formation-white-river-group-sioux-county-nebraska/#entry699681

Oligocene

E. Oligocene? (Rupelian?) (incl. Hemipristis curvatus & Isogomphodon frequens) – in coarse gravel – Alafia River bed, Florida

http://www.thefossil...ver-in-florida/

Oligocene - Brule Member of the White River Group - Sioux County, Nebraska

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/59218-oligocene-terrestrial-micros-from-nebraska/

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/66138-oligocene-micros-from-the-m-m-ranch-in-nebraska/

Miocene

E. Miocene – Coosawhatchee Fm., Hawthorn Grp. – Gainesville, Alachua Co., N. peninsular Florida

http://www.thefossil...sville-florida/

http://www.thefossil...art-3/?p=482047

M. Miocene – Round Mtn. Silt Fm. – Sharktooth Hill site, Ernst Ranch, near Bakersfield, Kern Co., SC California

http://www.thefossil...eld-california/

Miocene – zone 16, Choptank Fm. – Virginia

http://www.thefossil...ros#entry427430 (sharks, rays, Lagodon, Pogonias)

http://www.thefossil...ros#entry433798 (a var. of rays, bony fish otoliths)

http://www.thefossil...ros#entry460266

Miocene, Langhian Age, lower "dark" horizon, Loupian Quarry, France

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/80695-micro-shark-ray-and-bony-fish-specimens-from-the-miocene-of-france-and-cretaceous-of-the-congo/

M. Miocene? – Pungo R. Fm.? – Lee Crk. (phosphate) Mine, N. of Aurora, Beaufort Co., CE. North Carolina (see Purdy et al., 2001)

http://www.thefossil...from-aurora-nc/ (Alopias, Rhincodon, Dasyatis, Raja, Paramobula, etc.)

http://www.thefossil...-window-screen/

http://www.thefossil...ros#entry453842

Lt. Miocene?– upper Bone Valley Fm.?, in coarse gravel – Alafia River bed, Florida

http://www.thefossil...ver-in-florida/ (incl. Dasyatis and Rhynchobatus teeth)

Lt. Miocene? – upper Bone Valley Fm.? – Joshua Crk. bed coarse gravel, Florida

http://www.thefossil...orida/?p=477293

Lt. Miocene – upper Bone Valley Fm. – phosphate mine, Polk Co., C. peninsular Florida

http://www.thefossil...ine-in-florida/

Lt. Miocene? – upper Bone Valley Fm.? – Peace River bed gravel, nr. Rt. 17 bridge, nr. Zolfo Sprs., Hardee Co., C. peninsular Florida

http://www.thefossil...ver-of-florida/

http://www.thefossil...florida-part-2/

http://www.thefossil...eek-in-florida/ (with Isistius teeth)

Pleistocene

Pleistocene - Melbourne Bone Bed - Merritt Island, Florida

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/58306-pleistocene-micros-from-merritt-island-florida/?p=620548

References

Bourdon, J., K. Wright, S. G. Lucas, J. A. Spielmann, and R. Pence, 2011. Selachians from the Upper Cretaceous (Santonian) Hosta Tongue of the Point Lookout Sandstone, central New Mexico. Bull., New Mexico Mus. Nat. Hist. & Sci., no. 52, iv + 54 p., 28 figs.

Case, G. R., and H. Cappetta, 1997. A new selachian fauna from the late Maastrichtian of Texas (Upper Cretaceous/Navarroan; Kemp Formation). Munchner Geowissenschaftliche Abhandlung, Reihe A, vol. 34, pp. 131-189, 15 pl.

Duffin, C. J., 2001. Synopsis of the selachian genus Lissodus Brough, 1935. Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologische und Paleontologische Abhandlungen, vol. 221, no. 2, pp. 145-218.

Everhart, M., P. Everhart, E. M. Manning, and D. E. Hattin, 2003. A middle Turonian marine fish fauna from the upper Blue Hill Shale Member, Carlile Shale, of north central Kansas (abstract). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 23, supplement to no. 3, p. 49A.

Goody, P. C., 1976. Enchodus (Teleostei: Enchodontidae) from the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale of Wyoming and South Dakota, with an evaluation of the North American enchodontid species. Palaeontographica, Abteilung A, vol. 152, no. 4-6, pp. 91-112, 3 pl.

Jorgensen, S. D., and N. L. Larson, 1996. The Carlile Shale of the Milbank Granite District, Grant County, South Dakota; with regional correlations based on ammonite and shark faunas (abstract). Geological Society of America, Rocky Mountain Section, Abstracts with Programs, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 12-13.

Kelly, S. R. A., and R. G. Bromley, 1984. Ichnological nomenclature of clavate borings. Paleontology, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 793-807.

Lewis, S. E., 1999. Selachians from the Carlile Formation (Cretaceous-Turonian) of Grant County, South Dakota. St. Cloud State University (St. Cloud, Minnesota), Occasional Papers in Paleobiology, vol. 9, no. 1, 27 p.

Lewis, S. E., T. J. Kunkel, S. M. Matrious, and T. T. Behnke, 2000. Invertebrate and vertebrate fauna from the Carlile Formation (Cretaceous-Turonian) of Grant County, South Dakota. St. Cloud State University (St. Cloud, Minnesota), Occasional Papers in Paleobiology, vol. 10, no. 1, 39 p.

Martin, R. L., 2002. Taxonomic revision and paleoecology of middle Devonian (Eifelian) fishes of the Onondaga, Columbus, and Delaware limestones of the eastern United States.

McKinzie, M. G., R. Morin, and E. Swiatovy, 2001. Fossil collector's guide to the North Sulphur River. Dallas Paleontological Society, Occasional Papers, vol. 4, 119 p., 20 pl.

McNulty, C. L., Jr., and B. H. Slaughter, 1972. The Cretaceous selachian genus Ptychotrygon Jaekel, 1894. Eclogae Geologie Helvetiae, vol. 65, no. 3, pp. 647-655, 1 pl.

Meyer, R. L., 1974. Late Cretaceous elasmobranchs from the Mississippi and East Texas embayments of the Gulf Coastal Plain. Unpublished PhD dissertation, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, xiv + 419 p.

Purdy, R. W., V. P. Schneider, S. P. Applegate, J. H. McLellan, R. L. Meyer, and B. H. Slaughter, 2001. The Neogene sharks, rays, and bony fishes from Lee Creek Mine, Aurora, North Carolina. In C. E. Ray and D. J. Bohaska, eds., Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, III. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleontology, no. 90, p. 71-202.

Rees, J., and C. J. Underwood, 2002. The status of the shark genus Lissodus Brough, 1935, and the position of nominal Lissodus species within the Hybodontoidea (Selachii). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 471-479.

Schwimmer, D. R., J. D. Stewart, and G. D. Williams, 1997. Scavenging by sharks of the genus Squalicorax in the Late Cretaceous of North America. Palaios, vol. 12, pp. 71-83.

Slaughter, B. H., and M. Steiner, 1968. Notes on the rostral teeth of ganopristine sawfishes, with special reference to Texas material. Journal of Paleontology, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 233-239.

Stewart, J. D., and J. E. Martin, 1993. Late Cretaceous selachians and associated marine vertebrates from the Dakota Rose granite quarry, Grant County, South Dakota. South Dakota Academy of Science, Proceedings, vol. 72, pp. 241-248, 1 pl.

Ward, D. J., and R. L. Wiest, 1990. A checklist of Paleocene and Eocene sharks and rays (Chondrichthyes) from the Pamunkey Group, Maryland and Virginia, U.S.A.. Tertiary Research (Leiden, Holland), vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 81-88.

Weems, R. E., and Grimsley, G. J. (eds.), 1999. Early Eocene vertebrates and plants from the Fisher/Sullivan site (Nanjemoy Formation), Safford County, Virginia. Virginia Div. of Min. Res., Publication 152, 159 p.

Welton, B. J., and R. F. Farish, 1993. The collector’s guide to fossil sharks and rays from the Cretaceous of Texas. Horton Printing Co., Dallas, xviii + 204 p.

Marco Sr.

  • I found this Informative 10
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Thank you for compiling links to all your micro material topics; this is a great addition to the Forum's content!

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Very nice Marco! I had no idea your collection of micros extended to so many locations! And such different varieties of matrix. Thanks for compiling your various posts like this. I have no doubt I will be using this as a reference. :)

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PA Fossil Finder

Thanks for putting all of these in one place, I use them a lot to help identify my microfossils.

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Alright Marco! Now I don't have to hunt all over for your posts to reference. Thanks :)

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I have pinned a link in the Microfossil forum to this topic, so that it will be ever-easy to find.

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Thank you indeed Marco, with all these in one place I'm sure it will be a valuable reference for all the folks on here who hunt the micros as you do. With this being but a small part of your collection I have two questions: Have you discovered anything yet undescribed? I would think since so many folks never have searched for micros that would up the odds of making a discovery.And for my second, how do you dispose of all the hunted matrix? I can only imagine you have rolling hills in the front yard and a bomb shelter in the back lol.Thanks so much for all the info you have given me personally and all the help to other members as well :) Even without your macro fossils included you have a beautiful and extensive collection!

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Thank you indeed Marco, with all these in one place I'm sure it will be a valuable reference for all the folks on here who hunt the micros as you do. With this being but a small part of your collection I have two questions: Have you discovered anything yet undescribed? I would think since so many folks never have searched for micros that would up the odds of making a discovery.And for my second, how do you dispose of all the hunted matrix? I can only imagine you have rolling hills in the front yard and a bomb shelter in the back lol.Thanks so much for all the info you have given me personally and all the help to other members as well :) Even without your macro fossils included you have a beautiful and extensive collection!

I actually have a pretty extensive macro fossil collection. But my heart is really in the micros. I have a mammal named after me (Peradectes gulottai) from a micro Eocene mammal jaw that I donated to the Smithsonian. From what I have been told by the Smithsonian and a very renowned paleontologist who spent a week at my house in 2012 looking at some of my collection, I have at least 20 new or undescribed species of shark and ray and many more named species that have not been reported from the US or from the different formations where they came from. The Smithsonian is right now studying 70+ very small Eocene bird bones of mine. My wife has an extensive network of gardens and my matrix fills the paths through them.

Marco Sr.

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I have pinned a link in the Microfossil forum to this topic, so that it will be ever-easy to find.

Chas

Thank you. Hopefully TFF members will get some id help and the micro bug from my posts.

Marco Sr.

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Very nice Marco! I had no idea your collection of micros extended to so many locations! And such different varieties of matrix. Thanks for compiling your various posts like this. I have no doubt I will be using this as a reference. :)

Thanks for putting all of these in one place, I use them a lot to help identify my microfossils.

What an outstanding reference! Thank you Marco.

Alright Marco! Now I don't have to hunt all over for your posts to reference. Thanks :)

I put a list together of my micro posts for John S. a little while back and figured that others might get some use from it also. Hopefully the ids are correct in the posts, but the more teeth that I see, the more I realize how difficult it can be to id shark, ray and especially fish specimens.

Marco Sr.

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  • 1 year later...

It is an excellent reference. Thanks to you both.

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... Hopefully TFF members will get some id help and the micro bug from my posts.

Marco Sr.

We hold you responsible for all such infections ;)

Heck, there are members who have joined because of you! :)

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fossilized6s

Wonderful!! I know I've referred to your posts on countless occasions.

I'm glad to see you back MarcoSr. I hope all is well.

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It is an excellent reference. Thanks to you both.

We hold you responsible for all such infections ;)

Heck, there are members who have joined because of you! :)

Thank you for the kind words.

Marco Sr.

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Wonderful!! I know I've referred to your posts on countless occasions.

I'm glad to see you back MarcoSr. I hope all is well.

Charlie

Even though I'm retired, I am fully immersed in three major projects (VA marine micro vertebrate studies, shark tooth image analysis, and marine coprolite studies) in addition to my regular fossil collecting and matrix searching which takes a lot of my time. So unfortunately I won't be posting much if at all on TFF for a while. The list Earl made of my micro posts was definitely something that I did want to post.

Marco Sr.

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Glad to see you back even if just passing thru Marco: )

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Glad to see you back even if just passing thru Marco: )

Jeff

If I find an upper cookie cutter tooth in the fine matrix from your creek, I'll definitely post pictures on TFF.

Marco Sr.

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Good luck!

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Thanks much guys!. Appreciate all the expertise and help provided! Regards, Chris

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Thank you Marco Sr. and Earl. This list is where I go for initial ID info, and now it is even easier to reference. :)

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  • 1 year later...
  • 9 months later...

Although this is an older post, I am glad I stumbled upon it. I have been getting into micros a bit and these galleries have helped me with ID for sure!

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