Jump to content

Wilson Clay Pit Unknown


dre464

Recommended Posts

On one of our last trips to the Wilson Clay Pit, I found this. I have been unable to identify it with my current resources. It looks like some type of bivalve, but I can't find anything with the same ornamentation. It appears to have spines, most of which have been broken off. The specimen is below. The scale is in centimeters.

post-18428-0-63637300-1472093668_thumb.jpg post-18428-0-75446400-1472094596_thumb.jpg

Hopefully someone can help me identify it. Thanks in advance!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a crushed spiny brachiopod.

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with spiny brachiopod. Hang onto it. Maybe one of the more unusual genera from there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice brachiopod. I think, there is a fusulinid on the left side, at least looks like that.

post-17588-0-36890300-1472194342_thumb.jpg

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
fifbrindacier

I think there is what look like a coral above it on the right.

post-21013-0-48234800-1472224954_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. I was thinking spiny brachiopod as well, but I can't find anything that looks like it. I'll have to search for papers that describe Texas types.

Trust me, tmaier, the thought crossed my mind, but the more terrifying thought was damaging the spines that are still intact. I'm mildly impatient and severely ham-handed. Maybe with a little more experience in prepping.

Thanks, abyssunder. Fusulinids are VERY common in the Wilson Clay Pit. It seems like every piece of fossil hash that I pick up has one or two (or 50)...

fifbrindacier, I think what you are seeing is a bryozoan called Rhombopora, another very common fossil in the pit. They turn up everywhere!

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

While taking pictures of my collection for cataloging, I stumbled across two more examples of this brachiopod/bivalve.  The first is a small fragment, again with several fragments of spines still attached.  The scale is in centimeters.

 

066a.jpg

 

The second example is, perhaps, the most complete.  There are small spine fragments still attached, and also, very interesting larger spines that extend beyond the edge of the shell.  Again, the scale is in centimeters. 

 

067a.jpg

 

I've been searching for an ID for awhile now, and I still can't find anything that looks like it.  Is erose correct?  Are they uncommon?  Or am I just looking in the wrong place?  As always, any help is tremendously appreciated!

 

Daniel  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...