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Swear this is not a hoax.


FossilDiggin

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FossilDiggin

A customer of mine got into a conversation about fossil hunting. The old timer found this antler in a gravel pit in 1960 while working. I assure you it's real plus he has zero sense of humor so I'm sure he's not pulling my leg. I've tried to research what it could possibly be but have had no luck. I told him I would give it the ol college try to ID it for him... any thoughts?

IMG_1511.JPG

IMG_1510.JPG

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Jesuslover340

More pictures and locality info would help ;)

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Certainly looks like a beautiful and delicate specimen, but not an antler. Are you able to get a closer view of where it meets the base? Where was this gravel pit?

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FossilDiggin

I will try to get more photos from him. His wife has to send them to me because he has taken a stand against technology such as them "fancy VCR tapes" and what not. He found it working in a gravel pit in forest hill Louisiana.

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FossilDiggin

Pictures aside has there ever been an animal in existence with antlers this small that wouldn't of been some deformity. Or am I really wasting my time looking into this? I've seen it and it looks like bone to me but I am skeptical.

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It might be a coral.
I can't find my older post regarding to the similar one...

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I do not know what it is, but it bears some basic similarities to Gorgonian corals (sea whips) that I commonly see on beaches around here. The base is what I'm primarily looking at. Maybe an avenue to explore?

 

G

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I'd go with coral as well, the smallest deer in North America is the endangered key deer, which has much thicker antlers. 

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TNCollector

Please send these pictures to the LSU geology department. There has been a lot of speculation about the age and origin of the Citronelle formation due to the lack of fossils coming from the time it was deposited. This could be helpful to them. The Citronelle formation is the formation in which these gravels come from.

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The branching doesn't look right for antlers, I'm more inclined to go along with Gorgonia looking at the porous nature of the base. Another possibility is a fungus

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A while back,there was a thread about octocorals,in which yours truly contributed some tepid information/literature

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I'm leaning towards the infamous South Dakota baby Jackalope.  :ighappy:

 

IMG_4918.thumb.PNG.29fb872bb392769c67cb6fef1530bc3c.PNG

 

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Looks like the base remnant of a fan coral.  What it is doing in a gravel pit in Louisiana, I don't know.  I have found them in Baja.

fan coral.jpg

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fossilized6s

Leaning towards Jackalope as well.........

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6 hours ago, fossilized6s said:

Leaning towards Jackalope as well.........

I've seen a real jacolope albeit stuffed and put on a wall in a rather quirky pub in the village my parents live. 

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